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Our Favorite Porsches For Sale This Week: Volume 141

We’ve been compiling some amazing Porsche models on the internet for over five years now, and we’ve seen some pretty astonishing examples pop up now and again. This week we’re still working on getting our beach body. For that reason, we’re looking for buff widebody Porsches to inspire us! Hopefully you’ve enjoyed our « curated » look at the Porsche market. Keep in mind, some of these Porsches could be great collection investments, while others might prove to do more financial harm than good.

INTERESTED IN HAVING YOUR PORSCHE FEATURED HERE?

Every other week, we feature 5 of our favorite Porsches for sale. That post is sent out to our mailing list of more than 17,000 Porsche owners and fans and is seen by tens of thousands of other readers who visit our site directly. If you’re selling a Porsche on eBay and would like to see it featured here, just shoot us an email with the details and we’ll be back in touch. Otherwise, feel free to check out all the other eBay listings we have on our Porsches for sale pages.

1. 1979 Porsche 911 SC Targa Widebody For Sale

This wide and chunky Porsche looks great, doesn’t it? Obviously it didn’t look like this from the factory, but with the addition of some huge width flares, a Ruf-style bumper, and a wild 964 rear tail you wouldn’t think it would look quite right, but somehow it has grown together to have a pretty cohesive look. It’s got a good stance with some big wide wheels and tires. It’s got an interesting look with the Targa bar painted body color, and the soft top replaced with a hard metal roof. The interior looks awful, and the engine compartment looks a mess, so buyer beware, but it’s an interesting look from 10 feet, I imagine.

For more pictures, pricing, and information, check out the full listing on eBay

2. 1975 Porsche 911S Slantnose Widebody For Sale

I’m a real sucker for a slant nose coupe with wide turbo fenders and a 935-style tail. Add a set of flat-faced basket weave wheels color matched to the body, and I’m instantly in love. Unfortunately, this car doesn’t have the go to match its show, as it still features a bog standard 2.7 liter S motor from the mid-1970s. If this had some wild naturally-aspirated 3.4-liter that breathes fire, or a mega turbocharged job, it would be worth the bodywork. As it sits, this car is all hat and no cattle.

For more pictures, pricing, and information, check out the full listing on eBay

3. 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Sunburst Widebody For Sale

This Porsche is legit with a capital L. Before Nakai San started off on his worldwide tear of building RWB wide-fendered Porsches, he worked for Sunburst Japan building widebody Porsches. The original wide fender look was cribbed directly from Porsche’s motorsport models. You can see the RSR and GT2 influences here and there. You can see the incredible worksmanship that has gone into this car. You can see the gorgeous paintwork and the awesome engine work. This might be the coolest street legal Porsche I’ve seen for sale this year. Snatch it up before it’s gone.

For more pictures, pricing, and information, check out the full listing on eBay

4. 1973 Porsche 911S Targa Widebody For Sale

It’s hard to argue against a 1973 911S. The 2.4-liter engine is a gem with its high-spec camshafts. The suspension is well set up from the factory. It’s a beauty to boot. This one, however, has been fitted with some huge fenders and giant tires to resemble a period 911 RSR. The RSR was, obviously, a coupe. This treatment doesn’t look quite right on a Targa model, but it looks right enough that I would hustle it through the canyons every day from now until my dying one. It’s not perfect, but it’s got potential. And eye-searing yellow paint, which is always a plus.

For more pictures, pricing, and information, check out the full listing on eBay

5. 1979 Porsche 911 SC Widebody For Sale

I mean, just look at it. I love everything about this, except for the fact that the rear decklid says « Turbo » while the engine is clearly not turbocharged. I despise that immensely, and would throw that badge away immediately. Otherwise, this is great.

For more pictures, pricing, and information, check out the full listing on eBay

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2019 Porsche 992 Carrera S vs 4S first drive review

We’ve been here before, right? A new 911, which among our fraternity will forever be known as the 992. In Porsche’s model line there’s nothing more significant, even if today 911 sales are a mere support act to the SUV bottom line. Simply put, the 911 remains the company’s icon, the car that defines the firm. The 911 represents success on road and track, a million-selling sports car that’s instantly recognisable; unique in the automotive world.

Which is why replacing it is about as difficult a task as Porsche has. Time doesn’t stand still though, and the 911 has to evolve to work in the world it finds itself in. That evolution has unquestionably allowed it to endure and succeed, but the transitional points in its lifecycle will always be significant and debated ad-infinitum among drivers and the likes of me in titles like this.

The 911 matters to people then, more so than any other car. It doesn’t actually seem like that long ago I was reviewing the then new 991, or indeed 991.2; in the time since they’ve gone on to become the 911, after the usual difficult transition period where everyone is looking dewy-eyed about the outgoing model. I’ll do that now, the Carrera T manual that I’d borrowed off the UK press fleet in anticipation of driving the new 992 feeling pretty much perfect to me. That 991 should be good though, it being at the end of its development cycle.

Everything learned from that and more has been adopted here with the 992. There are two of them here today, a Carrera S and Carrera 4S. They are, as all will be until the standard Carrera arrives later this year, PDK, and pulling the right paddle shifter here can now be done eight times. “They’re the same,” is the reply when I request that both cars feature in the same shot.

Visually, that’s true; the Carrera S and Carrera 4S are identical, even more so when they’re painted the same Racing yellow. The only clue to the 4S’s additional drive is the badge on its backside. Choose the model delete option, or better still the simple 911 numbering, and you’d not know it’s a four, Porsche’s decision to make all Carreras widebody removing that go-to identifier of drive. It’s big, this new 911, as wide as the outgoing GTS and GT3, a bit longer and taller, as well as heavier. We’ll get to that later.

The dynamics engineers certainly weren’t complaining when the decision to go widebody was made. You might think that it was the chassis engineers that dictated it, but the 992’s a widebody for different reasons, key among them being the cooling. The 992’s 3.0-litre twin turbo flat-six has to pass ever-tighter laws for economy and emissions, and an efficient turbo engine is a cool one. That defines not just the physicality of the 911’s shape, but the large cooling intakes fed by active vanes at the 992’s nose. Here, now, in natural light and in the pitlane of the Hockenheimring, I have to say it looks good. It’s unmistakably 911, as it should be, design boss Mauer’s team having dipped into the 911’s past to bring it forward. From the cut-out recess on the bonnet to the SC-aping font for the rear 911 badging, via the large headlights sitting upright (cut exclusively out of the wings rather than puncturing the bumper), there’s no mistaking its lineage.

That expansive rear is spanned by an LED strip light across its entire width, the slightly recessed lighting and three-dimensional Porsche badge across the back leaving you in no doubt that you’re following a 911. The pop-up rear wing that aids stability now also acts as an airbrake when stopping from speed. It’s better integrated than that on the 991, but is still arguably an inelegant if undeniably effective solution to the 911’s aerodynamic Achilles heel. It’s the other pop-out element to the new 911 that’s causing the most debate here today; the door handles. They look neat, but their operation isn’t perfect, feeling insubstantial and not always popping out to greet you. That you have to lift and pull rather than simply grab counts against them too. A small thing, perhaps, but they feel like the answer to a question nobody asked, particularly in comparison to those on a 991.

Once inside, this is clearly a 911 for a new era. The quality takes a leap, the build feeling substantial, the materials, too. It’s an attractive cabin, the centre dash coming with a near 11-inch screen containing all the info and entertainment functions. It’s a touchscreen, adding connectivity and configurability to your nav and entertainment that you probably never knew you wanted or, arguably, needed. Choose the Sport Chrono and you’ll be able to select the driving modes…

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This UK Company Wants To Give Your Old Boxster A New 911 Makeover

It takes a good sense of self to admit that we’re not getting any younger. The world takes its toll on our bodies, minds, and occasionally fitness. We can’t run as fast as we used to, and usually don’t look as good as we used to. Our style has changed, and what was once fashionable is now dated and embarrassing to be seen wearing in public. There are a few ways to deal with this, you can accept your fate and age gracefully, or completely change your appearance and personality in an attempt to stay young. It’s rare that it works in humans, and even more rare that it works in cars.

If you’re the owner of a 986 or 987 generation Porsche Boxster, you’ve dealt with the fact that it’s a dated and out-of-touch design in today’s car market. My own Boxster, a 1997 model, looks like it was designed in the early 1990s, because it was. A Nu Dimension, a company in the UK which claims to have more than a decade of experience creating replica bodywork, has crafted a set of fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP) body panels to transform the look of your old base-model drop-top into a modern 911 widebody coupe. It’s truly a strange proposition, but somehow it works kind of nicely.

A Nu Dimension calls the conversion a « GT Boxster », and it incorporates some aspects of Porsche’s 991 GT3, and others from Porsche’s 991 Turbo. The kit starts at around $7,000, which includes a huge list of parts (below).

The kit includes:
Front trunk lid
Front fenders
Front bumper
Door sills
Rocker covers
Rear quarter panels
Roof panel
Trunk lid
Aero-kit-style spoiler
Bodywork internals
Updated mirror housings (designed to keep the factory motors)
Wheel arch liner extensions
Rear quarter engine ducts
Window rails
and all hinges and brackets.

An additional kit of optional components is available to make the interior look a bit more finished. This kit costs about $450.

While the only completed car appears to be the white Porsche shown in photos here as the company’s display piece. It appears to be nicely done, and likely took hundreds of hours of sanding, paint preparation, and installation. We’d love the opportunity to get up close and personal with one for a few hours if someone here in the U.S. has a kit or a complete finished product. I’m particularly interested in seeing if this body weighs any less than the original steel and aluminum. Are the original rear quarter panels simply cut out, or are they still underneath the wider bodywork? What do the panel gaps look like up close?

What do you think? Would you consider making your great handling Boxster look more like a 991 amalgam? Interestingly, the wheelbase of the two models is only about 1″ different, with the 991 being a bit longer than the original 986. There are quite a few giveaways that prove to anyone who knows that this isn’t a 991, especially if they look at the interior to see the original rollbar still there, with a bulkhead behind the seats instead of a rear seat passenger compartment (luggage shelf).

Obviously this kit does nothing to modify the performance of your old Boxster, so if you’re okay with a car that looks like a 991 Turbo which only produces between 201 and 291 horsepower, more power—or actually less?—to you.

Source: motoringresearch.com

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Does this 944 Deserve to be a Hot Wheels Car?

Back in 1978 Hot Wheels released a 924 in 1:64th scale, as is tradition for them. It had blackwall tires, and the same 5-spoke styled plastic wheels seen on most Hot Wheels of the day. About a decade later Matchbox released a 944 Turbo. I had one, it was green, the Porsche crest was huge across the hood, and the doors opened. It was a neat car. Compared to 911s, transaxle cars have always been thin on the ground in the Die Cast world. Hot Wheels’ latest endeavor, the Legends Tour, invites custom car builders to throw their vehicles into the ring for a chance to become a unique Hot Wheels car. 15 finalists will be chosen to join the Hot Wheels stand at SEMA 2018. In Las Vegas one will ultimately be selected to become an actual Hot Wheels model.

Brian Bergeron’s 944 is not for purists. All that truly remains of the original 1987 Porsche bodywork is the pillars, and every other panel has been modified, replaced, or otherwise altered from Porsche’s original vision. The car is fitted with a 944 Turbo S transaxle, the strongest variant, a blessing because this car is no longer powered by a 140 horsepower 2.5-liter inline-four. Brian performed an LS swap, helping to give the car the grunt to back up the aggressive looks.

Purity notwithstanding, does this 944 have what it takes to be a Hot Wheels car? Hot Wheels’ more bespoke cars have a reputation for true absurdity. From cars like Twin Mill and Deora, the latter was also based on a real custom car, Hot Wheels’ exclusive Die Casts are pretty extreme things, and Brian’s 944 faces some stiff competition from the other finalists.

From a Dodge bus based camper to the craziest Rambler wagon I’ve ever seen, Brian’s car has a tough road ahead of it.

We wish Brian well, though. The world needs more transaxle Porsches in small scale.

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Our Favorite Porsches On Ebay: Volume 117

We’ve been compiling some amazing Porsche models on eBay for three years now, and we’ve seen some pretty astonishing examples pop up now and again. This week we’re focusing on a grab bag of Porsche models from over the years, including track prepped examples, project cars, and tuner models. Hopefully you’ve enjoyed our curated look at the Porsche market. Keep in mind, some of these Porsches could be great collection investments, while others might prove to do more financial harm than good.

INTERESTED IN HAVING YOUR PORSCHE FEATURED HERE?

Every other week, we feature 5 of our favorite Porsches on eBay. That post is sent out to our mailing list of more than 17,000 Porsche owners and fans and is seen by 10s of thousands of other readers who visit our site directly. If you’re selling a Porsche on eBay and would like to see it featured here, just shoot us an email with the details and we’ll be back in touch. Otherwise, feel free to check out all the other eBay listings we have on our Porsches for sale pages.

1. 1993 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Rauh Welt Widebody For Sale

It’s not often that an RWB widebody car comes up for sale, though as more continue to be built it will gradually become a more frequent event. There are still only a few hundred of these worldwide, so if you’re looking to own one, it’s best to just buy as they become available. This is a very good looking car, and would perhaps work quite well as a track toy or canyon carver. Building on Porsche’s propensity to build racing cars with tacked on widebody kits, this is a believable facsimile to something Porsche could have built in the early 1990s alternative universe. Plus it has a super rare Porsche Design by MOMO steering wheel. I like it, but I sure can’t afford it.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

2. 1976 Porsche 912E For Sale

This appears to be a quite clean and original example of a driver-grade 912E. I own a 912E in honestly quite poor condition by comparison, and I will say that I love the driving experience. While you still have the 911 handling prowess that Porsche is known for, the car weighs in total a couple hundred pounds less than a contemporary 911, giving it a quite neutral balance. The 912E is quite low on power compared to a 911, but that simply means you are forced to be more involved in the driving process. You have to wring the car’s neck for all it’s worth. That, to me, is part of the car’s charm. It still needs a bit of work, but if you think that you can enjoy that experience, buy this car.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

3. 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo EvoMS GT700 For Sale

This is one wild 996 with a ton of performance upgrades. The listing claims that the upgrades were performed about 25,000 miles ago, and have proven quite reliable. Visually, the car has been fitted with GT2 body components and a Martini-style livery package over the top of the original black paint. The 19″ HRE wheels are a little too big for my tastes, but it’s not difficult to find wheels for a 996 Turbo. Personally, I’d swap them out for a set of 18″ wheels, because they fit the fenders a little better.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

4. 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Cabriolet For Sale

Is there anything better than a nice top-down drive on a summer evening? Sure, a top-down drive on a summer evening in a Porsche 911! The 993 design has always struck me as a bit awkward, but the narrowbody cabriolets really look slick. This silver car with a black interior is quite unassuming, and will make you look fresh as summer fades into autumn. Pick one up now, because the drop-top 911 prices are still reasonable, while coupes have exploded!

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

5. 1987 Porsche 924S Track Car For Sale

This 924S started life as a mostly unappreciated narrowbody 2.5-liter 944 lesser-than. They’re a bit rare and a whole lot of fun to drive, featuring a lightweight chassis, analog controls, and lots of balance thanks to a transaxle chassis. This particular chassis has been given a light fender flare treatment, a full roll cage, race interior, and most crucially, a 3-liter twin-cam engine from a later 944 S2. I can only imagine how much fun a 924S would be with a big bump in power as that would provide. The 3-liter twin-cam is an incredible engine in the 944 S2, so in a lighter chassis, it must be a riot. This appears to be a quite well assembled car, with very few corners cut. With a good inspection, this could be your next track machine!

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

INTERESTED IN HAVING YOUR PORSCHE FEATURED HERE?

Every other week, we feature 5 of our favorite Porsches on eBay. That post is sent out to our mailing list of more than 17,000 Porsche owners and fans and is seen by 10s of thousands of other readers who visit our site directly. If you’re selling a Porsche on eBay and would like to see it featured here, just shoot us an email with the details and we’ll be back in touch. Otherwise, feel free to check out all the other eBay listings we have on our Porsches for sale pages.

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Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

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