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Ten top photos from Total 911 issue 145

There are so many great features in Total 911 issue 145, it seemed a shame not to share a little snippet of each. So, here in photographic form, we’ve put together a quick preview of the latest issue.

From two ‘Legends of Rennsport’ and a guide to originality, through a turbocharged trip across Ireland’s greatest roads to the Sebring-winning Porsche 993 GT2 Evo, we’ve got it all covered in issue 145. Here’s what you can find inside:

It may be the most iconic Porsche 911 ever but can the 2.7 RS out run its 3.0-litre successor in our 'Legends of Rennsport' head-to-head?

It may be the most iconic Porsche 911 ever but can the 2.7 RS out run its 3.0-litre successor in our ‘Legends of Rennsport’ head-to-head?

Chrome wheels and a wood interior? It can only be the Porsche 911 Millennium Edition. We get behind the wheel of this 996 oddity.

Chrome wheels and a wood interior? It can only be the Porsche 911 Millennium Edition. We get behind the wheel of this 996 oddity.

Brumos isn't Florida's only famous Porsche race team. Get up close and personal with Champion's Sebring-winning 993 GT2 Evo in issue 145.

Brumos isn’t Florida’s only famous Porsche race team. Get up close and personal with Champion’s Sebring-winning 993 GT2 Evo in issue 145.

In a battle of the Porsche 997s, we see if the Gen1 GT3 is worth the extra outlay over the Carrera GTS.

In a battle of the Porsche 997s, we see if the Gen1 GT3 is worth the extra outlay over the Carrera GTS.

In the current Porsche 911 market, originality is a highly prized quality. Our latest ultimate guide walks you through what to look for.

In the current Porsche 911 market, originality is a highly prized quality. Our latest ultimate guide walks you through what to look for.

Lee tackles some of Ireland's tastiest roads in the latest Porsche 911 Turbo S. Can the 991.2 provide forced induction thrills on its way to the other Hollywood?

Lee tackles some of Ireland’s tastiest roads in the latest Porsche 911 Turbo S. Can the 991.2 provide forced induction thrills on its way to the other Hollywood?

We talk to the experts to discuss the tuning potential of the new 911 Carrera's turbocharged 9A2 flat six. Find out more inside issue 145.

We talk to the experts to discuss the tuning potential of the new 911 Carrera’s turbocharged 9A2 flat six. Find out more inside issue 145.

The twists and turns of the Elan Valley in central Wales are this month's Great Road.

The twists and turns of the Elan Valley in central Wales are this month’s Great Road.

Does the super rare 3.0-litre Rennsport live up to its billing? Find out in our 2.7 RS v 3.0 RS battle in the latest issue.

Does the super rare 3.0-litre Rennsport live up to its billing? Find out in our 2.7 RS v 3.0 RS battle in the latest issue.

To read all of this and much, much more, pick up Total 911 issue 145 in store today. Alternatively, order your copy online for home delivery, or download it straight to your digital device now.

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Porsche 997.2 Carrera ultimate guide

Ever since the 964 arrived back in 1989, there has been a decision to make before signing on the dotted line for a new Neunelfer, and that’s whether to choose a car driven by two wheels or four.

Capable as it is, the latter usually brings with it a penalty in terms of weight and complexity, so if all-weather security isn’t a priority and you prefer an arguably purer 911 experience, then rear-wheel drive it is.

Fast forward 20 years and that decision brings us to the 997 Carrera 2 in Gen2 form, a model launched for the 2009 model year and one that was to introduce 911 buyers to some new technology.

997-2-spoiler

The changes for the Gen2 began at the back where the chain-driven 3.6-litre flat six boasted improvements in both power and torque over the first-generation car. An extra 15bhp and 20Nm respectively boosted outputs to a very useful 345bhp and 390Nm, resulting in a 0-62mph time of 4.9 seconds and a 179mph top speed.

Of lightweight alloy construction, the revised unit featured chain-driven camshafts with VarioCam Plus variable valve timing and lift on the inlet side, and a dry sump lubrication system with electronically controlled on-demand pumping to improve efficiency.

The real interest, though, came with the addition of the DFI system, which injected fuel at up to 120 bar and allowed a notably higher 12.5:1 compression ratio.

997-2-interiorEuro 5 compliant, the new unit boasted a reduction in CO2 emissions of nine per cent and six per cent better economy in manual form; claimed figures were now 225g/km and 29mpg combined.

Impressively reliable and with no bankrupting IMS or bore-scoring issues to worry about, there’s few concerns for the buyer as long as the example you’re looking at is accompanied by a detailed service history and a fat wad of bills.

With the last cars barely four years old, regular maintenance at an OPC is quite likely, but specialist servicing isn’t prohibitive, with RPM Technik charging £375 for a 20,000- mile check and £953 for the bigger 60,000-mile service.

To read our ultimate Porsche 997.2 Carrera buyer’s guide in full, pick up Total 911 issue 144 in store today. Alternatively, order your copy online for home delivery, or download it straight to your digital device now.

997-2-carrera-rear

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Ten top photos from Total 911 issue 144

Six-figure superstars and Porsche 930s may dominate the cover of Total 911 issue 144 but they aren’t the only Neunelfers in the latest issue, as our photographic summary illustrates:

£100,000 provides plenty of Porsche 911 variety in our issue 144 cover feature. Which would you go for though?

£100,000 provides plenty of Porsche 911 variety in our issue 144 cover feature. Which would you go for though?

It's not just Porsche that's paying homage to the original 911R. We get behind the wheel of this celebratory replica based around a Porsche 912.

It’s not just Porsche that’s paying homage to the original 911R. We get behind the wheel of this celebratory replica based around a Porsche 912.

Looking better value than ever before, issue 144 features an ultimate guide to the Porsche 997.2 Carrera, perfect for prospective buyers.

Looking better value than ever before, issue 144 features an ultimate guide to the Porsche 997.2 Carrera, perfect for prospective buyers.

Two classic Porsche 911 Turbos but which one provides the greatest forced induction thrills? 930 3.0 and 3.3 go head-to-head to find out the answer.

Two classic Porsche 911 Turbos but which one provides the greatest forced induction thrills? 930 3.0 and 3.3 go head-to-head to find out the answer.

We delve into the world of Porsche exhaust tuning in our latest technology investigation.

We delve into the world of Porsche exhaust tuning in our latest technology investigation.

Built by the factory 40 years after the Porsche 911's Monte Carlo debut, this 996 GT3 RS proved that water-cooled Neunelfers could still rally.

Built by the factory 40 years after the Porsche 911’s Monte Carlo debut, this 996 GT3 RS proved that water-cooled Neunelfers could still rally.

From flywheels to sport suspension, Total 911 issue 144 features the top ten modifications to make to your M96 or M97-engined Neunelfer.

From flywheels to sport suspension, Total 911 issue 144 features the top ten modifications to make to your M96 or M97-engined Neunelfer.

We go behind the scenes at Tech 9 to find out the secrets behind this independent specialist's success.

We go behind the scenes at Tech 9 to find out the secrets behind this independent specialist’s success.

Air-cooled or water-cooled. Turbocharged or naturally aspirated. Our six-figure superstars have all bases covered in issue 144.

Air-cooled or water-cooled. Turbocharged or naturally aspirated. Our six-figure superstars have all bases covered in issue 144.

To read all of this and much, much more, pick up Total 911 issue 143 in store today. Alternatively, order your copy online for home delivery, or download it straight to your digital device now.

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Porsche 991 GT3 ultimate guide

We’ve previously subjected the first model to sport the GT3 badge, the awesome 996, to our Buyer’s Guide microscope. This time, we fast-forward more than ten years to the very latest.

Make no mistake, Total 911 is a huge fan of the latest GT3, and having pitted it against a 997 GT3 RS back in issue 131, we were left staggered by its combination of technology, cosseting luxury, and exquisite handling.

Not only is it the most breathtaking, it’s possibly the most everyday-friendly 911 ever to sport the GT3 badge, ever the embodiment of a proper Porsche according to Butzi himself.

991 GT3 wing

One of the reasons we rated it so highly was down to what lies beneath that purposeful rear wing, a 3.8-litre motor producing 475hp at a spine-tingling 8,250rpm.

Almost 100bhp more than the original GT3, it’s a thrilling confection of cutting edge, lightweight construction with titanium conrods and forged pistons that allow it to rev to an intoxicating 9,000rpm. With VarioCam variable valve timing for both inlet and exhaust camshafts and an advanced dry sump lubrication system, it’s also the first GT3 to feature direct fuel injection.

But as regular readers will know, it hasn’t been without issue, with a spate of high profile engine fires threatening to put a dent in Porsche’s reputation for peerless engineering.

991 GT3 engine

We’ve previously covered the problem in some detail, but essentially a failed connecting rod bolt could lead to terminal engine failure, with the resulting oil leakage leading to the much-publicised infernos.

After issuing a ‘stop driving’ notice to owners – some of whom were understandably dismayed after parting with more than £100,000 ($133,000) for their car – Porsche set about changing the engines in the 785 model year 2013-2014 cars affected.

However, despite a dozen examples being fitted with a second new motor due to a valvetrain issue, and the recall of 35 model year 2015 cars to have the spark plugs and coil packs replaced (a short circuit could have caused damaging engine misfires), it seems that Porsche’s quick action has left used values unharmed.

To read our ultimate Porsche 991 GT3 buyer’s guide in full, pick up Total 911 issue 143 in store today. Alternatively, download your copy straight to a digital device now and save 30 per cent.

Porsche 991 GT3 side

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Porsche 911 2.7 ultimate buyer’s guide

This isn’t the first time a 2.7-litre 911 has appeared on the pages of Total911.com but it thoroughly deserves another airing in issue 140. Why? Because it marks a rather significant chapter in the development of the Neunelfer – the introduction of the G-Series models.

The preceding F-Series had been successful cars for Porsche, not only selling in useful numbers, but also being revered for their delicate styling and impressive performance.

It was time for a change though, and the most obvious of those – even to the casual observer – was the adoption of impact bumpers. A legislative requirement, they were well integrated into the 911 shape and defined the model right up to the launch of the 964 some 15 years later.

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Down to business then, and it’s worth acknowledging that a 911 that’s more than 40 years old is going to involve some corrosion. The metalwork was galvanised from 1976 using a hot-dip protection process, but the threat of rampant tin-worm is ever present, bringing with it the potential for terrifying restoration costs.

Filler-laden bodges are a risk, so scrutiny from a specialist is vital before parting with any money. But if you want to undertake a preliminary check there are numerous places where rust can lurk.

The front wings will rust around the wheel arches so have a good prod around the lip of the arch, and examine the headlamp bowls and around the fuel filler. It’s also worth checking the security of those impact bumpers as the mountings can succumb to rot.

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And, while on the subject, they are made of aluminium, which can become badly pitted – if they are rescuable, then costly stripping, media blasting, and repainting is the only answer. Replacing them is also not cheap as a new rear item is around £1,000 before fitting.

The front luggage compartment will also need careful scrutiny, focusing on the floor, inner wings, and panel seams, while the areas around the fuel tank and battery could also have been compromised with expensive consequences.

Indeed, it’s an area that marks some of the key changes for the 2.7, among them a change to a single battery rather than the previous twin items. There was also the addition of a deflated space-saver spare tyre with an electric pump should the worst happen, which in turn allowed the fitment of a larger fuel tank to take advantage of the car’s new-found efficiency.

To read our Porsche 911 2.7 ultimate guide in fill, pick up Total 911 issue 140 in store today. Alternatively, download it straight to your digital device now. 

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