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Turbo 3.6

30 yearsof 964: C2 v RS and Turbo v Turbo-look

Modernity is what the 964 brought to the 911, it arriving on the cusp of a new decade and would, in the then-CEO Heinz Branitzki’s words, “be the 911 for the next 25 years.” It never was, nor, admittedly, was it intended to be, but in the six years it was produced the increase in technology, as well as the proliferation of models, set the template for how the 911 would evolve into the model line we recognise today.

Its massively revised structure and chassis was able to incorporate necessities like power steering, driver and passenger airbags, an automatic transmission and also four-wheel drive. It was tested more rigorously on automated test beds, was built using more modern, cost-effective production techniques and brought the 911’s look up to date, without taking away from its iconic lines.

Such was Porsche’s focus on four-wheel drive it was launched as a Carrera 4, the Carrera 2 following it into production in 1989. Over the six, short years that followed the 964 would proliferate into a model line-up including Targa, Cabriolet, Turbo and RS in the regular series models, with specials like the Turbo S, RS 3.8, 30 Jahre and Speedster models all adding to the mix. It came at the right time, too, replacing the outdated 3.2 Carrera and boosting sales for Porsche when it needed them, the Carrera 2 and 4 selling 63,570 examples, those specials and the Turbos and RSs adding around 10,000 sales on top of that.

It was a successful, important car for Porsche, but just how does it stack up today, and which one to go for? The 964 is the car that introduced the 911 conundrum, one which, in part at least, we’re going to try and settle here today. We’ve four 964s here: a Carrera 2, an RS, a Carrera 4 widebody with its Turbo-aping hips, and a later 3.6 example of the 964 Turbo. The Carrera 2, naturally, is the most available, with some 19,484 sales globally, the RS selling some 2,405, the widebody being very limited (numbers are hard to come by) and the Turbo 3.6 finding 1,427 buyers for the year it was produced.

For many the Carrera 2 is the obvious choice, but take all the numbers out of the equation and things get a little bit different. To digest it there’s a natural split, the narrow and widebody cars, which is why I’m jumping first into the slim-hipped Carreras, and specifically that big-selling Carrera 2.

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Une rare 964 Turbo Flat Nose… la Porsche à 1 million de dollars !

Les Porsche 911 ont la côte, ce n’est pas un scoop ! Alors qu’il y a quelques années elles s’échangeaient pour le prix d’un Scenic neuf, aujourd’hui, elles pulvérisent les plafonds et sont devenues l’un des placements financiers les plus rentables qu’il soit ! Surtout celle qui débarque… puisque sa côte flirte avec le million […]

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Cet article Une rare 964 Turbo Flat Nose… la Porsche à 1 million de dollars ! est apparu en premier sur De l’essence dans mes veines.

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Quand le sultan de Bruneï s’offrait une 964 Turbo 3.6…

Qu’il peut être plaisant d’être la tête couronnée d’un micro-état pétrolier aux rentes colossales. Entre autres privilèges, cela permet de ponctionner quelques recettes régaliennes afin de se faire un petit plaisir en s’offrant une 964 Turbo 3.6 flambant neuve. Mais puisque nous parlons d’un souverain, il semblait évident que l’auto en … Lire la suite Quand le sultan de Bruneï s’offrait une 964 Turbo 3.6…

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