Vous êtes ici : PassionPorsche >

SC

Our Favorite Porsches For Sale This Week: Volume 130


We’ve been compiling some amazing Porsche models on the internet for a few years now, and we’ve seen some pretty astonishing examples pop up now and again. This week we’re looking at Porsche models from the 80s and 90s, because we’re just getting back from Radwood Austin. Hopefully you’ve enjoyed our « curated » look at the Porsche market. Keep in mind, some of these Porsches could be great collection investments, while others might prove to do more financial harm than good.

INTERESTED IN HAVING YOUR PORSCHE FEATURED HERE?

Every other week, we feature 5 of our favorite Porsches for sale. That post is sent out to our mailing list of more than 17,000 Porsche owners and fans and is seen by 10s of thousands of other readers who visit our site directly. If you’re selling a Porsche on eBay and would like to see it featured here, just shoot us an email with the details and we’ll be back in touch. Otherwise, feel free to check out all the other eBay listings we have on our Porsches for sale pages.

1. Makellos’ 1978 Porsche Safari 911 SC For Sale

I saw this car in person during the Momo Road To Rennsport rally, and it was impressive to watch it being put through its paces. Whether dirt or paved, the 911 seemed to be able to handle anything you threw at it. I have not driven this particular Safari 911, but some of the others I’ve been in have driven quite well, and are well worthy of inclusion in Porsche history. This is a recent trend, but the usefulness of a higher ride height and aggressive tires is never lost on those who know.

From the ad:

Work included custom-fabricating rear strut mounts and a roll cage, as well as front and rear brush guards with aluminum skid plates. The suspension was fitted with KW Clubsport coilovers and 935 components, and PAGID Racing brake pads were also installed along with fifteen52 wheels and all-terrain tires. Power comes from a 3.0-liter flat-six equipped with 964-grind cams, and the 915 transaxle was fitted with with shorter 2nd-4th gears and a Wavetrac limited-slip differential. The interior was refurbished with new Recaro seats, PRP harnesses, door panels, and carpets. Additional lighting, a fiberglass rear deck lid with ducktail spoiler, and a roof rack were also fitted, and a white livery was applied over the Guards Red paint. The car has been driven approximately 2,500 miles since the work was completed, and it is now being offered in California with records and photos from the build process, a Porsche Certificate of Authenticity, and a clean Virginia title.

If you’re looking for a unique Porsche driving experience, this one will treat you well.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on Bring A Trailer.

2. Mario Andretti’s 1985 Porsche 911 Turbo Kremer K2 Street For Sale

Inspired by iconic Kremer racing cars of the era, the German Porsche tuner worked with its fiberglass supplier DP Motorsport to build a series of street cars with a similar aggressive look. These slant nose cars are held in high regard, both because they were built by an extremely reputable shop, but also because they made crazy levels of power, and looked just crazy enough to match. If you’re looking for a rad-era Porsche, it doesn’t get much more rad than this.

According to the listing, this car was originally ordered by motorsport legend Mario Andretti. That just adds a bit more cachet to the listing, and adds another talking point to your conversation starter.

From the ad:

This car started life as a 930 turbo and was first sent to the Kremer brothers for performance upgrades like group B cams,custom k27 turbo and custom made Dp intercooler  then to DP for fitment of lightweight body panels consisting of a slant nose front end with lower oil cooler scoop, brake scoops, horizontal shaped driving lights,shaved front fenders with air extraction vents.
 
Further adjustments were made resulting in extensively widened rear fenders with inter-cooler air inlets clad with horizontal strakes, flush fitting side mirrors, extended rocker panel sills, resculpted lower rear valence and large rear tray spoiler. The Contact patch was also increased to harness the 500 HP emanating from the Kremer engine with ultra wide BBS modular wheels mounted on low aspect ratio tires. Upon Completion this car was imported into the unites states in March of 85.
 

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

3. 1997 Porsche 911 Carrera 2S For Sale

The 993 C2S is the rarest example of regular series 993 built, with fewer examples even than the iconic and expensive Turbo S. If you’re looking for a fun example of the smooth 90s shape, this is a good place to start. The twin-split rear engine grille is a great look, and of course the rear-drive layout gives you more steering feel versus the four driven wheels of a C4S or a Turbo. If you’re in the market for a 993, this might be the one to look into. And prices are just now starting to level back to sanity. This one seems to be well priced.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

4. 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 For Sale

Where the 993 market seems to be settling down a bit, the 964 market is still going gangbusters. This example is a gorgeous low-mile lightly modified Grand Prix White C2. These are so great to drive, and because the economy was in the tank when they were made, are quite rare to come by. 964s are starting to get their due, or perhaps even a little more. This is the best shape 911 in my opinion, and drives more like a modern car than a Carrera 3.2 does. If you want one to take for canyon rips, this might be the one for you.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on Bring A Trailer.

5. Maritime Blue 1991 Porsche 964 Turbo For Sale

If 964 Carrera 2s are commanding crazy money, then the 964 Turbo market has gone bonkers. This particular example is revered largely for its very rare and very beautiful Maritime Blue paintwork. This example is still under 50,000 miles, and has recently had a full mechanical refresh. New suspension components, a clutch and flywheel, and a top-end engine rebuild to remedy the common head stud breakage issues. Based on the description in the ad, this car is ready for prime time. If you can afford it, I highly recommend buying this one.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Porsche 911 on safari

Did you know the Porsche 911’s first ever race was, in fact, a rally? The year was 1965, and Huschke von Hanstein, race director and Porsche PR officer, was keen to show off the dexterity of the company’s new sports car, which could be driven on the road and raced at weekends. Herbert Linge and Peter Falk were thrust into a 2.0-litre 911 for the legendary Monte Carlo rally, driving the car from Bad Homburg, Germany, to the Prince’s Palace in Monaco, finishing a creditable fifth overall. A 911 would win the notorious event outright in 1968 in the hands of ‘Quick Vic’ Elford, the first of many key rallying successes which forms an important part of the 911’s 30,000 overall race victories to date.

Meanwhile, alongside the sport kits which formed the basis of Porsche’s famous Sports Purpose manual in 1966, the company offered a rally kit – option 9552. Comprising of a pair of Recaro seats, roll bar, a 100-litre fuel tank with front hood filler, adjustable Koni shock absorbers plus subtle engine modifications, the kit was intended for customers who wished to participate in long-distance rallies.

Notable success on the rally stage has continued throughout the 911’s history. Who can forget the heroics of the factory-supported Prodrive SC RSs in the 1980s, a precursor to the 1984 Paris-Dakar-winning 953 and, later, the 959, which was built for the very purpose of rallying before the demise of Group B just before its release. The air-cooled 911 remains a regular participant in global regulation and speed rallies, with most notable success courtesy of British Porsche specialists, Tuthills. They have campaigned all manner of classic 911s in various rallies of considerable magnitude right around the world, with the late, legendary rally maestro Björn Waldegård often found at the wheel right up until his death in 2014. Current works driver Romain Dumas, meanwhile, developed his own 997 GT3 RS R-GT which competed alongside a rival 997 – again from Tuthill – in the 2015 WRC, with Porsche itself testing a Cayman GT4 Clubsport R-GT in 2018 with a view to joining the WRC series. As you can see, rallying isn’t a mere offshoot of the Porsche 911 – it’s forever been part of its DNA.

Meanwhile, safari 911s have well and truly captured the imaginations of wider enthusiasts in the last two to three years, catapulted into the limelight by pro racing driver and Porsche enthusiast Leh Keen’s imaginative safari builds. Others have since joined the market with their own off-road expressions of the 911, but what are these cars really like to drive? Today we’re going to find out, thanks to an invite from Makellos Classics to test their most remarkable project to date. Matt Kenyon, owner of the San Diego-based company, explains: “Safari cars are popular right now so we wanted to try our interpretation of it. Some cars have the look, but we wanted to build a car that you could legitimately take off-road.”

The 911 in question is a 1978 European SC, which Makellos acquired in April 2018 with 125,000 kilometres on the clock. As Matt describes, its spec was perfect for the project at hand: “When we came across this 911 SC it had a pretty cool factory spec. It had sunroof delete, lower console delete and radio delete. It just screamed at us to build a rally spec 911.” Work started in May and was completed by mid-September, an incredible feat when you consider this was a passion project which Matt, manager Greg Bartley and the rest of the Makellos team had to fit around a busy stream of paying client jobs.

After a strip down the team began with crucial fabrication work to the 911’s chassis, which entailed custom bracing all over the car as well as reinforcement of the rear strut towers. The front strut towers were custom braced, and custom front and rear skid plates were added too.

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Porsche 911 Cabriolets: G-series v 964 v 993

Yorkshire dry-stone walls have a very useful application that was never intended by the original builders several centuries ago. In addition to providing the unique signature style that is the Yorkshire landscape while also containing livestock over the centuries, they also make a superb surface to echo back the bark of an air-cooled 911 engine. Combine that with the final days of a long, hot summer and a trio of Cabriolet 911s – all with the hoods folded as they truly should be – and we have the perfect recipe for a great day’s driving and a chance to investigate the appeal of the open-top 911 experience. Will we enjoy a day in the sunshine, or will the bumpy Yorkshire lanes highlight the compromise of 911 body stiffness?

Heading out of the market town of Malton, I’m at the rear of the convoy in the 993 Cabriolet. The air is filled with the bass burble of air-cooled exhaust tones at low RPM, the whiff of that unique 911 aroma of hot oil and burned hydrocarbons from the two cars ahead spilling over into the interior, the sun providing a warmth on my face that is still pleasant so late in the summer. Good times.

Turning left down some of our favourite B-roads, the sunshine dapples the tree-lined road ahead… it’s time to increase the pace. We’re staying away from the vast, open moorland of the North Yorkshire Moors today, instead staying on the lower ground of the Vale of York and the twisting, turning B-roads that keep hands and feet busy as the road snakes between those ancient dry-stone walls. The three cars span an eight-year period of 911 evolution, from the torsion bars and impact bumpers of 1989, through the transformation of 1990 with power assistance and coil springs, to the final development of the air-cooled Porsche 911 in the 993.

Without a doubt everyone will have a personal favourite. Indeed, as we gather the cars together for photographs, the debate commences even before photographer Alistair has rigged his first flash head. The most visually arresting is the 1989 Super Sport in Guards red. For me this car is the epitome of that period of Porsche sales. The hedonistic period when excess was encouraged and every businessman and city trader in the City of London had to have a giant Motorola brick phone, expensive Italian shoes and matching briefcase, plus a Guards red Porsche 911. For the full-on effect it had to be the Turbo body, Fuchs alloys and the whaletail spoiler. And if you really wished to be publicly on display through the city streets, then the Cabriolet ensured that you shared your cellphone conversation with everyone around you as you discussed the day’s share trading at the traffic lights.

So how does the drive compare almost 30 years later? We hand over the keys to the 993 that we arrived in and swap to the cream seats of the Super Sport. Instantly I’m missing the powered steering as we shuffle back and forth to leave the photo location, the non-standard steering wheel not helping with its smaller diameter, though once rolling along the country lanes it’s much less of an issue. The road is initially bumpy, and several things become apparent. Firstly there is indeed that flex and shake from around the windscreen area that I recall from previous drives. Secondly, despite there only being a few years between the registration dates, the 1989 car does feel as though it’s from a much older generation of Porsche.

That’s not to say it’s a bad car – far from it. And as the road smooths out and widens we’re able to enjoy the bark of the 3.2 engine and use the echo board of Yorkshire’s dry-stone walls to enjoy some rather delightful pops and crackles on the downshifts. Through the avenue of trees we return to our location, and I swap into the black 964.

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Total 911’s real-world owner reports

Total 911’s ‘Living the Legend’ section is a popular feature of each issue, providing readers with real-world owner reports from our global band of contributors who not only live and breathe Porsche 911, they own them, too. Below is an excerpt from three of our dozen-strong lineup, whose models cover the entire breadth of the model’s 55-year history. You can catch their latest escapades in each issue of Total 911 – take out a subscription and get each issue delivered to your door.

 

Contributor: Tony McGuiness Porsche 911 model: 991.1  GT3 & 997.2 GT3 RS Dates acquired: December 2014 & February 2011

It is widely known that some 991.1 GT3s have had engine issues. In fact, in November of last year, GT3 owners including yours truly received a letter from Porsche stating that effective at once, the limited warranty on the GT3 internal engine components continues for ten years or up to 120,000 total miles, whichever occurs first.

This could become very important for me because last month on one of my usual drives through San Diego County, the GT3 lost power and began to run quite rough. I was able to drive it back home but clearly it wasn’t good.

I should also mention that occasionally on start-up the car could blow a huge plume of bluish-white smoke. It is worth noting that it isn’t unusual for a GT car to blow a small puff of smoke on start-up; it can be considered a charming characteristic of a GT3. However, my GT3, along with other owner’s GT3s, can occasionally blow a massive plume of smoke. When it does occur it can cover several cars parked behind in a huge cloud of smoke, which not only is embarrassing but obviously concerning.

Hoen Porsche in Carlsbad examined the GT3 and found the following: “Noted rough idle. Found fault misfire on cylinder six. Swap spark plug from cylinder six to cylinder four. Delete faults. Restarted engine, check engine light came on. Found misfire fault for cylinder four. Reinstalled spark plug from cylinder four, removed and replaced spark plug from cylinder six. Deleted faults. Turned on engine, noted check engine light is still on. Performed a second evaluation. Ran faults. Found fault for misfire on cylinder three active. Removed and swapped spark plugs from cylinder three to one and one to three. Deleted faults, turned on vehicle, found check engine light still on. Ran faults, found misfire on cylinder one active. Reinstalled original spark plug to cylinder one, removed and replaced the spark plug from cylinder three. Deleted faults. Started vehicle, no check engine light on. Performed a post evaluation and vehicle ran well.”

Porsche also found light oil in cylinder two which they consider to be within parameters according to the report. I can unequivocally state that the amount of smoke the GT3 can randomly discharge is in no way normal. Unless, of course, it was a battleship trying to hide under a smokescreen! Essentially, two spark plugs were replaced. This engine episode, of course along with the massive plumes of smoke, are very concerning to me, and not isolated occurrences. I have learned similar events have happened to other GT3 owners that led to Porsche replacing their engines. It would definitely seem that Porsche has extended the engine warranty for a reason. I will now video each engine start-up. This is unfortunate but something I will have to do. I truly hope that my GT3 ownership does not take a turn for the worse, and I am forced to report these issues each month. I will keep Total 911 readers posted!

 

Contributor: Joe Croser Porsche 911 model: 997.2 Turbo Date acquired: December 2015

My OPC Extended Warranty ran out in May and I didn’t renew. It wasn’t an easy decision – the OPC warranty is widely regarded as the best – but it was the right decision for me. After over two years and more than 8,000 miles I think I know my car well; I’ve seen it from all angles in various stages of undress and it’s never skipped a beat. Indeed, if ever there was a car I should worry less about it is (fingers crossed) probably this one, especially after filling the gearbox and engine with Millers Oils finest NT+ lubricants to reduce friction and improve longevity.

But it wasn’t risk which tipped the scales in favour of dropping the warranty, it was reward. You see, to truly enjoy my car I have made some essential mods. In late-summer 2017 I added the SharkWerks exhaust to transform the sound of the 3.8 flat six (issue 159). In the autumn I added the revolutionary DSC V1 PASM upgrade from TPC Racing to make my suspension truly adaptive (issue 160), and then as winter turned to spring I added Rennline radiator grills to protect and preserve my radiators and condensers from damage and debris (issue 165). Finally, as my old tyres were ready for a change, I had a new set of Michelin Pilot Sport 4Ss installed (issue 166). While the 4Ss in my size are without a doubt the best wet and dry tyre on the market, the tyres in my size remain without an N-Rating from Porsche, which means that my car will not pass the 111-point check with them wrapped around my alloys.

My mate Ben calls this the ‘opportunity cost’: to renew the warranty I would have to forego other opportunities to improve my car or incur additional costs to take off and refit these aftermarket improvements before and after an inspection. Even then I’d run the risk that a claim would be declined if the cause pointed to a third-party product as the issue or contributor. My car is better to drive with the PASM upgrade, the grippy Michelin tyres and the PSE-like exhaust sound. And with the reassurance of the Rennline grills I no longer fear for the integrity of the fragile rads and condensers hidden behind the front bumper. It’s a liberating thing and it’s the way it should be.

I have now owned this car for longer than any of its previous keepers, completing more miles in it than anyone else. It really is ‘my car’ for me to use as I see fit. I am not merely preserving it for its next owner; I am configuring it for my enjoyment, and I am now beyond being told by the Porsche Warranty company what I can and cannot do to it. I bought my car to drive. And drive it I shall, with a big grin from ear to ear.

 

Contributor: Lee Sibley Porsche 911 model: 996 Carrera 4S Date acquired: April 2017

Remember that KW V3 kit I brought home around three months ago? Well, after finally sorting a mysterious engine noise (which resulted in a need for a new auxiliary belt and water pump) and getting sidetracked with restoring my ‘Big Red’ brake callipers, at last I was ready for a switch-up in suspension.

For fitting I took my 996 along to Matt Samuel at ZRS Engineering. Matt is the brother of fellow columnist, James. My decision to go to Matt for the work came down to three key factors: as an owner of a 996.1 C4 himself he’s attuned to the workings of a 911; as 2013 British Drift champion he certainly knows all about car handling and control; and in running a small, independent business, I know exactly who’s going to be undertaking the work on my beloved Neunelfer.

I rocked up to Matt’s premises in Poole, Dorset early on the Saturday morning, and the man I would soon realise is nothing short of an engineering whizz soon got cracking. The car was promptly in the air, wheels off, front driveshafts popped off and factory struts whipped out. From here it was a case of fitting KW’s new front drop links to the KW front struts, plus top mounts. It’s a good idea to replace top mounts when fitting new struts, but luckily for me the rears were fine, while Matt had a spare set of very nearly new top front mounts from James’ 997.1 Turbo (cheers mate!), which is an identical part. Incidentally, Matt also tells me a 997 Turbo top mount is cheaper from Porsche than a 996 C4S, despite their striking similarity…

With top mounts and drop links affixed the KW coilovers were installed. Matt had the coilovers set at the height KW delivered them, but after a test drive found the car to be too low, promptly raising the 996 by 10mm at the front and 20mm at the back to give a slightly ‘raked’ stance. “The springs will need a bit of time to settle, so when you’ve burned through a tank of fuel, come back to me for a final tweak,” he said. It was at this point Matt earned my admiration: whereas others would have wanted to get the job done, the car out the door and the money in the bank, Matt’s diligence to getting the task at hand absolutely right really struck a chord with me. We agreed to leave the bump and rebound on KW’s ‘basic’ settings – they are 16-way adjustable – and have a play with the car as the miles roll along.

So how does it handle? Well I’m just about to complete that tank of fuel Matt has advised I burn through, so I’m due to revisit for a final tweak before a good geo. For road use the front is great, it feels supple enough to be palatable on our bumpy British B-roads while ensuring the front wheels stick stubbornly to the asphalt. The back, though, will need looking at, as it’s too harsh at slow speeds – the sensation is akin to M030, which I’ve always found too crashy on the road. I’ve noticed the car has also dropped slightly in ride height, so it’ll need raising, I’m estimating by around 10mm. I’ll report more on the finished article next issue, but for now I’m mega happy to have these KW V3s on the C4S and have been left so impressed by Matt’s excellent work.

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Porsche 911 Cabriolet buyer’s guide

As the winter rain and snow becomes a distant memory, thoughts can turn to summer, and what better way to enjoy it than from the cabin of a drop-top Neunelfer? Few sports cars blend history, performance and engineering integrity quite like this one, so it seems like the perfect opportunity to explore the genre in more detail. Back in issue 130 we sampled the one-of-a-kind 901 Cabriolet, and although that led to development of the Targa it was ultimately the progenitor of the model that’s been with us more than 35 years and seven generations.

And whether you favour air- or water-cooled cars there’s a model for every preference. It might have become more sophisticated over those years, but the basic principle remained the same, and its first appearance also coincides with the re-birth of the 911 after a period when it seemed that it might disappear for good. So, here is our rundown of both how it developed and how to buy the best Porsche 911 Cabriolet.

SC Cabriolet

After the concept debuted at the 1981 IAA show at Frankfurt – sporting a 3.3-litre Turbo engine and four-wheel drive – Porsche undertook some hasty re-engineering to ready the production car for the 1983 model year. Sharing a basic structure with the Targa, the SC Cabriolet reverted to the regular two-wheel drive layout and was powered by the Coupe’s 3.0-litre, 204bhp flat six. More than 4,000 examples were sold in the first full year of production, proving that there was a significant demand for a 911 that came sans roof. Speaking of which, the hood was a three-layer affair made from polyester and acrylic with a separate, insulating lining, and it was fitted over a lightweight, alloy frame.

Manually operated (electric operation wouldn’t arrive until later) it was fitted with a plastic rear window that Porsche recommended be unzipped before the roof was folded away and tidied up with a neat tonneau cover. Quite expectably this new model wasn’t a cheap option, early cars arriving in the UK carrying a price tag just north of £21,000; choosing the Sport variant with larger wheels and the rear spoiler took this to more than £25,000. But Porsche had made its point, and the 911 Cabriolet has been with us ever since.

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Suivez-nous…

Catégories

Archives

Nos partenaires