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Sales Debate: How will the manual 991.2 affect the GT3 market?

After the launch of the 991 GT3, everyone thought that the manual gearbox had been confined to Weissach’s history books. But now, with the 991.2 almost certainly set to come with the option of a clutch pedal, how will the new car affect the GT3 market? We ask the experts to lend their opinions.

“It’s a really hard one to make a call on,” says Parr’s Lawrence Stockwell. The independent specialist’s customers fall into one of two camps according to the head of PR: those who want the latest and greatest (“as long as it’s faster and better”), and those who prefer raw mechanical feel (“the purists”).

The former will prefer the 991.2 with a PDK transmission, while the manual gearbox may not be enough to appease the latter according to Stockwell. “I still think there is a question mark over the level of electronic involvement on the car. I don’t think the manual transmission is the fixer,” he explains.

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“I think it will help to restore people’s confidence but I still feel as though there is not a lot of love for the 991.” Therefore, the Parr man believes that “as far as values go, it’s [the 991.2’s] not going to have a massive effect” on the GT3 market.

RPM Technik’s Sales Manager, Greig Daly, disagrees about the level of love for the 991.1 (“it’s a fabulous transmission and a great car in its current guise”). He does agree with Stockwell though that the initial readjustment on the GT3 market will be minimal.

Assuming that stock availability is the same as the last generation, “you won’t be able to get hold of one because they’ll all be sold,” explains Daly. This means he expects the 991.2 GT3 to hit the used market at around £140,000-£160,000, knocking the Gen1 991s back slightly to “the early £100,000s.”

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But what about the 997.1 and 997.2 GT3s behind that? “I don’t really see that affecting them in the short to medium term because they’ve got a Mezger engine and race pedigree,” Daly says, perhaps validating Stockwell’s argument about the 991’s different character.

It may halt their appreciation but, as the RPM Sales Manager points out, “they’ve not really been moving” anyway. Instead, both Daly and Stockwell feel it won’t be until the sales split between manual and PDK becomes evident that the market will see any movement.

The Parr man concludes that, “the purists will want the manual gearbox and, maybe, initially those cars will fetch a premium. When the new car sales start revealing how many of each are being sold, then it will settle down.” It’s only once it has settled down (maybe a year down the line from launch) that the market will make any adjustments, according to Daly. Until then, we’ll just have to wait and see.

For market advice on any generation or style of Porsche 911, check out our full selection of sales debates, where we ask the 911 experts the pertinent market questions so you don’t have to.

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Sales debate: Why are 996 GT2s undervalued compared to 993 and 997 GT2s?

For a while now, 993 GT2s have sat near the top of the financial tree as one of the most expensive production Porsche 911s on the collector’s market; expect to pay upwards of £500,000 ($675,450) for a nice example of the original widowmaker. The 993’s successor, the 996 GT2, has lagged behind value-wise though.

A year or so ago, a water-cooled GT2 could be found for under £60,000 ($81,000), making it one of our Neunelfers to buy in issue 126’s investor’s special, and, despite a price rise proving us right, they still languish behind 993 and 997 widowmakers.

“There’s quite a handful of them on the market right now,” says Porsche specialist Lee Maxted-Page, “and they’re in a spread between £100,000 to £150,000 ($135,00 to $202,000).”

With just 173 examples of the 993 GT2 built compared to the 996’s production run of 1,287, is this price gap purely down to the numbers available?

Silver Porsche 993 GT2

“No,” Maxted-Page confirms. “996 GT2s are still very low production cars as there were 129 UK cars built between 2001-04: 16 in 2001, 66 in 2002, 31 in 2003 and then 16 Gen2s in 2004.”

However, despite the 996’s prowess as a driver’s car, Maxted-Page feels it can’t be compared to the 993, the latter a “proper homologated car for Le Mans.” Mark Sumpter from Paragon agrees, pointing to the 996’s lack of racing pedigree as a key reason why its value lagged far behind the 993 GT2.

While Sumpter points out that the relative abundance of 996s does, rightfully, have an effect on the GT2 price gap, he feels that as the 996 is “a decade newer than the 993, the water-cooled car hasn’t hit ‘classic’ values yet.”

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It’s one of the reasons why Sumpter believes “good, original-spec 996 GT2s will continue to appreciate”, making them a good purchase despite the price hike they’ve enjoyed over the last year.

Maxted-Page agrees: “A lot of this water-cooled stuff has taken more time to appreciate than the air-cooled stuff,” he says. “But recently, the focus has been on Turbos, from the early 930s right the way through.”

As the 911 enters a new turbocharged era, Maxted- Page feels that interest is only going one way: “Low mileage, factory original cars have the potential to be valued in the £150,000 to £200,000 ($202,000 to $270,000) bracket.”

Sumpter is even more optimistic and claims, “a low-mileage, perfect car may get to £250,000 ($337,600) in the next two or three years.” He adds, “I think they will settle at around one third of the price of a good 993 GT2.” Good news if you thought you’d missed the water-cooled widowmaker boat.

For market advice on any generation or style of Porsche 911, check out our full selection of sales debates, where we ask the 911 experts the pertinent market questions so you don’t have to.

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Sales Debate: Can the 996 Carrera follow in the 3.2 Carrera’s track?

We’ve caught RPM Technik’s sales director, Greig Daly, reminiscing: “I remember being sat at a table five years ago and one of my partners said, ‘3.2s will never go up.’” The tide has well and truly turned though, with RPM currently selling a 3.2 for close to £50,000.

That exact car was last in the specialist’s showroom in 2012 when Daly sold it for £25,000. Despite being built in significant numbers, an abundance of 3.2 Carreras hasn’t dented its investment potential. So could the equally popular 996 Carrera eventually hit similar heights?

What once seemed far-fetched now doesn’t seem so crazy according to Daly and Autofarm co-owner, Mikey Wastie. “Ultimately, I think there are 996 Carreras that could reach £50,000, but that would probably be for a special car,” the latter explains. “I think we are some way from a £50k Carrera unless it has history or a prominent owner,” the Autofarm proprietor continues.

Red Porsche 3.2 Carrera

On top of a general reappraisal of the 996 Carrera, Daly feels the upturn in the early water-cooled market is being driven by rising values at the top end. “The RSs are leading the way and, as they continue to go up, it makes a humble 3.4 or 3.6 look astonishingly good value.”

That’s why, in Daly’s mind, good Carreras have gone from £7,000-£10,000 to £12,000-£20,000. “Between £25,000-£30,000, you used to be able to get a Turbo. Now the game has moved on and people are looking for what else they can get for around £20k,” Daly continues. “Porsche isn’t making any more of these old cars so everyone is thinking, ‘If I can get a low mileage 996 C2, I might just stick it away.’”

The Carreras most likely to hit the £50k mark are, according to Wastie, those with “low mileage, in excellent condition and with great provenance.” In the Autofarm expert’s opinion, he’d bet on “an original spec, manual Coupe in a subtle colour”, if he were looking for a 996 Carrera with investment potential (although his main advice is to “enjoy it”).

Blue Porsche 996 Carrera 4

Daly points out though that despite the huge number of 996s built, those desirable “driver’s spec” Carreras are actually in shorter supply than most imagine, with only 20 or so on the market at any one time. The problem is, ironically, exacerbated by “the IMS issue that has seen some more leggy cars broken,” explains Wastie.

Price rises in the market have slowed down recently, meaning both Daly and Wastie expect that 996 values won’t inflate at anything near the same rate as the 3.2 Carrera did. However, with Daly recently spotting the first “£40,000 996 C4S for sale”, maybe we’re closer than we think to the first £50k 996 Carrera…

For market advice on any generation or style of Porsche 911, check out our full selection of sales debates, where we ask the 911 experts the pertinent market questions so you don’t have to.

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Sales debate: How do SSEs compare to narrow-body 3.2 Carreras?

If you’re in the market for a 3.2 Carrera but want to stand out from the crowd, you don’t have many options. You could try and find a Clubsport version, however, you’ll be landed with a significant premium over a standard car (think strong six-figure list prices).

That leaves the Turbo-bodied 3.2 Supersport (also known as the SSE). With their added rarity compared to a narrow-shelled 911, SSE values are undoubtedly north of a normal 3.2, but by how much? We enlisted the help of two experts to give us a clearer picture.

“I sold a really good 3.2 narrow-body (which had done 70,000 miles) recently for £49,000. A 70,000- mile SSE, you would probably see on the web for the £70,000 mark,” explains RPM Technik’s Sales Director, Greig Daly. “They [3.2 SSEs] are probably worth a third more.”

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However, Canford Classics owner and esteemed Porsche expert, Alan Drayson, doesn’t feel the gulf between the two body styles is so big. “If you had two, like-for-like, maybe you’d pay between £8,000-£10,000 more for a Supersport, but it would have to be in very nice condition,” he says.

Drayson is keen to point out that recent moves in the market make £70,000 3.2 SSEs unsustainable, if cars are actually selling already for that sort of money. “If a good 3.2 is £50,000 and then you have got a £20,000 rise to get your hands on a Supersport, you’re now into 930 territory at £70,000-£80,000. So why would you buy a Supersport?”

What both specialists do agree on, however, is that, despite their appealing Turbo-like looks, 3.2 SSEs aren’t always such an easy sell. “The narrow-body cars sell quicker, which may be for two reasons,” Daly explains.

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“First of all, they are a lower entry point and also there is more choice of cars.” Despite a recent customer specifically wanting a Supersport, Canford Classics is similarly sparse when it comes to SSEs: “The numbers are not huge; less than ten,” reveals Drayson.

The added rarity of the SSE currently means that 3.2 Supersports are “more of a collector’s car” according to Daly. While he appreciates that he’s generalising, he feels “the guys that buy the wide-bodies have got a few Porsches already.”

In comparison, “the standard 3.2s are bought by people who just want one as their ‘weekend’ car.” That may not be quite the case going forward though, depending on which specialist has correctly called the market.

For market advice on any generation or style of Porsche 911, check out our full selection of sales debates, where we ask the 911 experts the pertinent market questions so you don’t have to.

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Sales Debate: Is there such a thing as an entry-level Porsche 911?

For years, Porsche 911 fans have been spoiled with at least one low cost entry point into Neunelfer ownership. However, price rises and the subsequent age of the investor have gradually eroded the sub- £10,000 Porsche 911 market. First it was the 964 that shot up in value, then it was the turn of the SC.

Now, market trends appear to show that it’s the 996 Carrera’s turn for an upsurge. So does this mean that there is no longer such a thing as ‘the entry-level 911’? Has the enthusiast looking for their first taste of Zuffenhausen’s finest been priced out of the market?

“I think [996] 3.4s are still fairly low priced, aren’t they?” Darren Street, Sales Manager at RSJ Sports Cars, points out. “If people can stretch into a 3.6 then it does get you a better car. But as an entry-level 911, for what they are now, which is around £10,000-£12,000, it’s a lot of car for the money.”

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£10,000 seems a little on the low side even for the 3.4 market but Paul Stephens – head of his eponymous specialist and a strong 996 advocate – agrees. “My view is that the 996 is the entry-level 911. It’s possible to buy one for half the price of a new Golf GTI, isn’t it?”

“Okay, £10,000 isn’t the notional figure for one anymore (not for a nice one, anyway) but you can still buy one for under £20,000,” says Stephens. “At that point, I think it’s got to be termed an ‘entry-level 911’ today,” he continues.

Stephens also points out that the market isn’t necessarily the problem. It is people’s perceptions: “Entry level – for anything – is no longer £10,000. If you go and look in a normal dealership, what do you buy for £10,000?”

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And while a 996 Carrera is more expensive than it once was, Stephens explains that it is still a “family hatchback entry-level” car.

But is the 996 a good entry-level choice though? “They had some issues but, again, it can be overhyped by the forums,” RSJ’s Street points out. And the market for them seems strong according to both experts. “I don’t think they are going to lose any more money,” explains Street.

“They’ve had a little move because everything has had a move,” Stephens adds. “The market is realigning itself.” The signs, therefore, all point to the 996 as the favoured entry into the 911 experience. You may just need to save a little bit harder than before…

For market advice on any generation or style of Porsche 911, check out our full selection of sales debates, where we ask the 911 experts the pertinent market questions so you don’t have to.

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