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Here Are All Of The Quirks and Features of the 992-Generation Carrera

We all know that the 911 has grown a lot, but seeing Doug DeMuro next to this Lizard Green 992 has really cemented just how much. All 992s are now « widebody » cars, and as a result a base Carrera is a whopping 72.9″ wide. That’s 4.5″ wider than a 993 (though perhaps about the same as a Carrera RS), or 3.2″ wider than a 996. It’s a full 10″ longer than a 993. While it’s only slightly longer than a 996, the blunted nose and general proportions make the 992 appear to take up significantly more volume. Porsche has gone to great lengths to ensure that the 911 is both mechanically and visually a 911 through and through. It is simply striking how large it looks next to a 6’3″ Doug.

More striking than the size though is the dizzying array of technology throughout the car. From the lighting to the infotainment, there is a lot here to digest. Gone are the days of climate control sliders whose operation can be reversed if you hook the control unit up incorrectly (I’m looking at you, Project 944 GTS), and in are capacitive buttons governing most functions, vast infotainment displays, and multi-adjustable everything.

While some of those items, notably the capacitive buttons, will send enthusiasts who recall the Lagonda into convulsions, it’s really shocking how classically-Porsche the interior looks. The material choices look excellent. The shapes and layout inside the car will make an air-cooled 911 owner feel much more at home than any 996 or 997.

While enthusiasts have a luddite-like tendency to abhor technology in sports cars, I think Porsche deserves praise here. The new car seems to have given a lot of consideration to which controls are best served by physical buttons and switches rather than an endless array of sub menus. It’s a hard balance to strike, and while hardcore technophobes will never be truly happy with the 992, for the majority of us the car offers technology when you want it, and enough transparency when you do not.

While there isn’t much to take away from Doug’s driving impressions, you’d be better served looking to someone like Chris Harris for on-track insight, or JayEmm for on-road insight, his impressive level of thoroughness is always exceedingly helpful with the nitty-gritty of what a car will be like to live with.

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2 New Items From Porsche Driver’s Selection Worth Checking Out

We’re big fans of Driver’s Selection products.  As most of you know, Driver’s Selection has been a long time supporter of FLATSIXES.COM and for that we are grateful.  We recently received a couple of new products to try out for ourselves from two of the collections.

Rucksack – Urban Explorer Collection

The Urban Explorer Collection is geared to the business traveler.  With this is mind, this pack would make a great carry on.  It’s large enough to contain everything you would need (no dimensions are listed but it’s approximately 18″ x 12″ depending on how much you stuff into it).  It’s made of a sturdy water repellant material and seems quite durable. Padded straps make it comfortable to wear. The pack has a laptop compartment, large main compartment and two outer pockets perfect for easy access to your passport, wallet or other small items.

Price: $175

 

Rucksack – GT4 Clubsport Collection

The GT4 Clubsport Collection caters to fans of the 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport.  The black and yellow color palette of the collection is inspired by the vehicle paint.  This rucksack is small and very lightweight.  With one main compartment it’s the perfect size to throw in a windbreaker, wallet, keys, or other small items you might want for a day at the track.  Additionally, the zipper features a detachable black and yellow key chain.  The two mesh side pockets are great for a water bottle or sunblock and the light mesh straps will keep you cool and not weigh you down.

Price: $45

There’s a lot more on offer at the Porsche Driver’s Selection online store.  If you haven’t yet taken a minute to check it out, you should do so.  If you’re a Porsche fan there’s bound to be something to fit your lifestyle.

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Here Are The Things You Can Do While Waiting For Your Taycan To Charge

Carfection, as per usual, has the best produced and most insightful video reviews on the internet. They’ve returned with Henry Catchpole to review the Taycan Turbo S on the road. As we already knew, the Taycan is a certified good car, and gets the unofficial Carfection seal of approval. But what it doesn’t do is take the place of an internal combustion engine sports car. Is the Taycan a 911 beater? No way. Is it a pretty good alternative to a Panamera Turbo? That’s right!

One of the many things people find to complain about electric vehicles is the length of time it takes to charge. The average fuel stop is 5-ish minutes, right? Tack on a few minutes to hop in for a pee and grab a soda pop and a Little Debbie brand snack cake from the convenience store, and you’re still in and out in about 10 minutes. The Taycan will take 20 minutes to charge up to 80% of the battery life. That last 20% takes quite a bit longer, as you have to taper off power delivery as the battery gets full. That means you’ve got an extra ten minutes to kill when you stop to recharge your brand new Taycan (assuming you can find a fast charger).

Thankfully Carfection is here with a list of things you can do while your Taycan recharges. Along with a full and comprehensive review of the car, naturally. Check it out!

 
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Porsche 2.4S, 964 C2, 997.1 GT3 RS, 991 GT2 RS: Driver’s 911s

By definition any 911 is a driver’s car, but the proliferation of Porsche’s sports car, through both time and model variation, means some 911s are that little bit more engaging and interesting to drive than its contemporary models.

As cars become ever more complex, weightier and increasingly remote, we’ve picked some 911 highlights which celebrate what’s arguably been taken away from more modern machinery: the unfiltered joy of pure driving.

Our quartet spans key eras of the 911 in the form of an early car, modern classic, recent Rennsport and the outrageous present, each example putting the driver at the very core of their existence.

A not-inconsiderable tract of time and huge technological advances differentiate the first and last 911s that we’re driving here, but each represents one of the defining elements of the 911, that being driver appeal.

Any of these cars will thrill and engage, each exhibiting character and engagement that’s commensurate with their era, but what is undeniable is that each and every 911 retains a signature that’s unique to it, which is why it’s such a celebrated sports car. Some though are worth celebrating that little bit more…

For the full road test of our driver’s 911s, pick up your copy of Total 911 issue 184 in shops now or get it delivered to your door via here. You can also download a digital copy with high definition bonus galleries to any Apple or Android device.

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Porsche 2.4S, 964 C2, 997.1 GT3 RS, 991 GT2 RS: Driver’s 911s

By definition any 911 is a driver’s car, but the proliferation of Porsche’s sports car, through both time and model variation, means some 911s are that little bit more engaging and interesting to drive than its contemporary models.

As cars become ever more complex, weightier and increasingly remote, we’ve picked some 911 highlights which celebrate what’s arguably been taken away from more modern machinery: the unfiltered joy of pure driving.

Our quartet spans key eras of the 911 in the form of an early car, modern classic, recent Rennsport and the outrageous present, each example putting the driver at the very core of their existence.

A not-inconsiderable tract of time and huge technological advances differentiate the first and last 911s that we’re driving here, but each represents one of the defining elements of the 911, that being driver appeal.

Any of these cars will thrill and engage, each exhibiting character and engagement that’s commensurate with their era, but what is undeniable is that each and every 911 retains a signature that’s unique to it, which is why it’s such a celebrated sports car. Some though are worth celebrating that little bit more…

For the full road test of our driver’s 911s, pick up your copy of Total 911 issue 184 in shops now or get it delivered to your door via here. You can also download a digital copy with high definition bonus galleries to any Apple or Android device.

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Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

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