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’54 Porsche 356 pre A 1500 GS Carrera compétition… Pure !

Le « Light is right » n’a pas été que le cri de guerre de tous les gentlemen driver anglais. Car à la fin des années 50, une allemande allait jeter un Bretzel dans la Jelly ! D’une simplicité enfantine, elle offrait une puissance à 2 chiffres, suffisante pour un poids qui flirtait avec les 600 kg… La […]

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Modern Race : Porsche Cayman versus… drones !

Y’en a ils doivent quand même avoir les fils qui se touchent… Je veux bien que chez Porsche on cherche à justifier un ADN sportif aux derniers Cayman et Boxster. C’est qu’il faut faire avaler la pilule d’avoir sacrifié le 6 à plat contre un 4 cylindres à plat aussi et aidé d’un turbo… Du […]

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Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS: Rennsport for the Road

The history of the iconic Porsche 911 Carrera RS of 1973 is as lengthy as it is fascinating. Introduced to the public at the Paris Motor Show in October 1972, it was a typical example of early 1970s motor trends, ushering in a brave new outlook on life, characterised by loud and colourful products.

The RS was a motoring pioneer from launch, its illustrious reputation carried forward with distinction right to the present day, where it is regarded as one of Porsche’s most iconic 911s.

It is remarkable, then, to think that initially Porsche was worried about selling even the first batch of 500 cars: in their calculation of expected market demand, the rather conservative marketing department estimated that they should make only the required 500 homologation units of the new Carrera RS.

Fuchs and ducktail 2.7 RS

Concerned that they would otherwise sit with large quantities of unsold vehicles, the RS was priced at just DM 34,000 (about £5,230) compared to the DM 31,180 (about £4,800) for the 2.4-litre 911 S.

Although the Carrera RS was aimed at the sporting fraternity, the marketing department hoped that many of them would find homes as road-going cars, thus boosting sales.

When most of the first batch of 500 cars sold out soon after the Paris launch, a second batch of 500 was authorised by Ferry Porsche. When they too cleared the order books, a third batch was commissioned, resulting in 1,590 units being produced in just ten months.

Rally 2.7 RS interior

With the benefit of hindsight, we might wonder why Porsche didn’t commit to a much bigger production run but, at the time, this model represented a big step for the company.

The Carrera RS was the first 911 to wear the ‘Carrera’ badge, a name which drew on the brand’s early days competing in the Carrera Panamericana race in the 1950s. This model was also the first road-going car to feature the ‘RS’ moniker (this stood for Rennsport or Racing Sport), a powerful indicator of the car’s sporting potential and ability to go racing.

Although the Carrera 2.7 RS was only around 12mph faster than the 2.4-litre 911S, the bigger-engined car was 42mm wider in an effort to cope with much higher cornering speeds.

To read our full drive of this raced and rallied 2.7 RS, pick up Total 911 issue 147 in store today. Alternatively, order your copy online for home delivery or download it straight to your digital device now.

Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS rear

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Poll: Who is the greatest Porsche 911 racer of all time?

For over 50 years, the Porsche 911 has seen unprecedented success around the world on both track and stage, from Daytona to Dakar and Le Mans to Monte Carlo.

In various guises (from the lightweight 911R to the fearsome turbocharged 935s on to the latest 911 RSR), the Neunelfer is the most decorated sports car in motorsport history.

However, without some superhuman feats by those behind the wheel, the Porsche 911 may never have become the sporting icon it now is. That’s why, in our latest poll, we want you to vote for your greatest Porsche 911 racing driver of all time.

racing-911s

From Sixties icons such as Vic Elford and Erwin Kremer, through Seventies legends like John Fitzpatrick and Rolf Stommelen, to today’s heroes, we’ve compiled a collection of names that represents our most comprehensive ever,

Making your job slightly easier, you can choose up to five different drivers and, if we have missed a Porsche 911 legend from our list, we’re open to suggestions too. Voting will close on Wednesday 30 November and the results will be published in Total 911 issue 148.


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2016 Porsche Mobil 1 Supercup: Hockenheimring, Germany report

Italian Porsche Junior, Matteo Cairoli inherited his third Porsche Mobil 1 Supercup victory of the season after fellow Porsche Junior (and home hero), Sven Müller was penalised for an illegal overtaking move on the first lap.

The in-house championship rivals’ battle began during qualifying at the Hockenheimring track, 50 miles north of Weissach. Lechner Racing’s Müller set his benchmark early in the session while Cairoli waited until the end to challenge.

However, the FACH Auto Tech driver’s final lap on new tyres was curtailed by a red flag with ended the session early, the Italian having to settle for second on the grid behind Müller (the latter heading into the German Supercup round with an 18-point lead after victory last time out in Hungary).

Müller may have lost out on a fourth Supercup win of 2016 but the German Porsche Junior still leads the standings ahead of Cairoli.

Müller may have lost out on a fourth Supercup win of 2016 but the German Porsche Junior still leads the standings ahead of Cairoli.

At the start, it was the Italian Porsche Junior who made the better start, diving up the inside of Müller at turn one. The German Porsche Junior though hadn’t given up, running off the track onto the tarmacked run-off before rejoining back in the lead.

Cairoli didn’t make the race easy for Müller, hounding the championship leader lap after lap and getting close to taking the lead after a late safety car period bunched up the field. However, his advances proved fruitless on the track as Müller took the chequered flag 0.4 seconds ahead.

The action wasn’t over though. Two hours after the chequered flag fell, the stewards deemed Muller’s opening lap move to have been performed illegally, handing the German a one-second penalty that promoted Cairoli to the top step.

Jeffrey Schmidt found a way passed Robert Lukas to take the final spot on the podium, the Swiss racer's second piece of Supercup silverware this year.

Jeffrey Schmidt found a way passed Robert Lukas to take the final spot on the podium, the Swiss racer’s second piece of Supercup silverware this year.

Behind the duelling duo, Jeffrey Schmidt (who stared at Hockenheim early in the year in the Carrera Cup Deutschland) equalled his third-place finish in Austria with another podium finish having forced his way passed Robert Lukas, the latter starting the race from third.

That grid slot would have been occupied by the third Porsche Junior in the field, Mathieu Jaminet if it hadn’t been for a ten-place penalty handed to the French Porsche ace for his role in the opening lap accident last time out at the Hungaroring.

Starting from 13th, Jaminet was aiming for eighth place after qualifying, an aim he achieved in the race with some clean overtaking moves. The result, however, has seen him drop from second to fourth in the points table, as Cairoli moves back into second, 16 points behind Müller.

For all of the latest Porsche race news and reports, make sure you check our dedicated motorsport section. 

A grid penalty for his Hungaroring accident meant French Porsche Junior, Mathieu Jaminet had to battle through the pack to take eighth in Germany.

A grid penalty for his Hungaroring accident meant French Porsche Junior, Mathieu Jaminet had to battle through the pack to take eighth in Germany.

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