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Speedster generations

“I took a 911 Cabriolet off the line and drove it to my hot-rod shop,” admits Preuninger. That car became a mix-up of Gen1 GT3 and that Cabriolet.

The result of the GT boss’ work was first shown to a select group of customers as far back as 2014 alongside the 911 R concept, which the Speedster shares a lot of DNA with. This new Speedster is a GT department model, a car which, if you take Speedsters at their most elemental, it always should have been. 

Even so, Preuninger admits: “We didn’t focus on every last gram and we’re not concerned about lap times.” While that might be true, a kerbweight of 1,465kg is just 52kg more than a manual GT3.

The Speedster, like the R, is exclusively manual, with no PDK being offered, saving 17kg in weight and pleasing the driving purists among us. There are the same 911 R carbon-fibre front wings, the underbody at the rear being R-derived, while PCCB is standard too.

Those early customers who saw it liked the idea of a properly raw Speedster, doing without any roof, but Preuninger and his team denied them that, fitting a hood, in part to ensure that owners actually use them rather than park them away with delivery miles in collections. And the 1,948 Porsche will build? That’s the year when the first Speedster was built. 

Opening the low, neat roof is simple enough – a button unlatches the hood at the top of the lower windscreen and unclips the buttresses which then spring up from the large clamshell. The clamshell lock is released too, and the huge carbon-fibre panel – the largest Porsche has ever made, and weighing just 10kg – lifts out and back on struts, the hood simply pushed into its stowage area underneath.

Pop down the cover and the Speedster is open, as it should be, the slightly steeper rake and lowering of the screen, as well as that rear, fundamentally changing the look of the 911. It’s very reminiscent of original 356 Speedsters, losing the sometimes-uncomfortable, heavy-looking rear of later 911 Speedster models. There’s also a hint of Carrera GT in its proportions, particularly that rear three-quarter view.

The black stone guards on the flanks fore of the rear wheels were a late – and necessary – addition, admits Preuninger, breaking the visual length while harking back to the G-series models.

You don’t have to have them, and if you’re after an even more retro style then there’s the Heritage Pack plus a numbered, customised Porsche Design timepiece, as is the norm these days.

Forget those, though. Preuninger leans in, says to press Auto Blip and the exhaust button and go and drive it. I argue I’ll do the footwork myself and leave the Auto Blip off, Preuninger laughing and saying: “It’s better than you,” before adding, “and me…”

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Is this the best colour for a 991 GT3 RS?

When it launched in 2015, Porsche’s 991 GT3 RS set a new benchmark for 911-oriented performance, kicking the 997 GT3 RS 4.0 into touch as the most accomplished naturally aspirated race car with licence plates. As expected, demand was high among enthusiasts for the new Rennsport, which as a Porsche GT car wasn’t ever going to be built on the same scale as more mainstream 911s.

This quickly gave birth to an unscrupulous second hand market, with a number of 991 GT3 Rennsports almost immediately made available for heinously inflated prices over list. In the market’s infancy, Total 911 witnessed some examples advertised for as much as £300,000. Sadly, most only had delivery miles registered on their odometer.

Thankfully, the fact that Porsche ended up building far more examples of the 991 GT3 RS than many speculators anticipated (the number is rumoured to be 7,000 worldwide) prices have softened, ensuring these cars have found the very home they were built for – the race track. Even better, Porsche’s Paint To Sample programme also proved particularly popular for 991 GT3 RS owners who were prepared to wait a little longer for delivery of their vehicle, and as the brilliant PTSRS Instagram page will show you, a full palette of colours have found their way onto examples around the world.

There are many one-off hues out there that brilliantly accentuate the wide body and outlandish aero of the latest naturally aspirated RS, however our favourite 991 GT3 RS PTS hue is Voodoo blue, exemplified by this stunning example currently for sale with Porsche Centre Bournemouth. A non-metallic colour (paint code Z12), it is originally thought to be a shade used by Toyota, Porsche’s current LMP1 rivals in the WEC. We’re told the voodoo represents water preventing evil spirits passing across it, with some folks of past painting their windowsills blue to stop these evil spirits entering their home. Whether that’s true or not, we’re not sure, but what we do know is there’s not a better colour for the striking curves of a 991 GT3 RS, in our opinion.

With a healthy 5,400 miles on the clock, this car has been used as it was intended, with a good specification to boot – and if you believe in the legend, that rare hue adorning its bodywork should even bring its next owner a healthy dose of good luck.

What’s your favourite PTS 991 GT3 RS? Comment below with your opinions.

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