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Is this the best colour for a 991 GT3 RS?

When it launched in 2015, Porsche’s 991 GT3 RS set a new benchmark for 911-oriented performance, kicking the 997 GT3 RS 4.0 into touch as the most accomplished naturally aspirated race car with licence plates. As expected, demand was high among enthusiasts for the new Rennsport, which as a Porsche GT car wasn’t ever going to be built on the same scale as more mainstream 911s.

This quickly gave birth to an unscrupulous second hand market, with a number of 991 GT3 Rennsports almost immediately made available for heinously inflated prices over list. In the market’s infancy, Total 911 witnessed some examples advertised for as much as £300,000. Sadly, most only had delivery miles registered on their odometer.

Thankfully, the fact that Porsche ended up building far more examples of the 991 GT3 RS than many speculators anticipated (the number is rumoured to be 7,000 worldwide) prices have softened, ensuring these cars have found the very home they were built for – the race track. Even better, Porsche’s Paint To Sample programme also proved particularly popular for 991 GT3 RS owners who were prepared to wait a little longer for delivery of their vehicle, and as the brilliant PTSRS Instagram page will show you, a full palette of colours have found their way onto examples around the world.

There are many one-off hues out there that brilliantly accentuate the wide body and outlandish aero of the latest naturally aspirated RS, however our favourite 991 GT3 RS PTS hue is Voodoo blue, exemplified by this stunning example currently for sale with Porsche Centre Bournemouth. A non-metallic colour (paint code Z12), it is originally thought to be a shade used by Toyota, Porsche’s current LMP1 rivals in the WEC. We’re told the voodoo represents water preventing evil spirits passing across it, with some folks of past painting their windowsills blue to stop these evil spirits entering their home. Whether that’s true or not, we’re not sure, but what we do know is there’s not a better colour for the striking curves of a 991 GT3 RS, in our opinion.

With a healthy 5,400 miles on the clock, this car has been used as it was intended, with a good specification to boot – and if you believe in the legend, that rare hue adorning its bodywork should even bring its next owner a healthy dose of good luck.

What’s your favourite PTS 991 GT3 RS? Comment below with your opinions.

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Porsche 996 Turbo S: the forgotten Turbo

Few could have feasibly predicted it beforehand, but 2015 has undoubtedly been the year of the 996. Historic stories of the generation being unloved are plentiful, though after values of the 996 GT3 RS and both GT3 generations rocketed north in 2014, enthusiasts this year turned to the Turbo as the last bastion of affordable Mezger-engined thrills.

As such, these too have seen values increase: what was a £25,000 supercar is now pushing £40,000 for a clean example, which places the humble 996 Turbo directly onto the heels of its younger 997 Turbo brethren.

While the 996 Turbo has appreciated, values of the Gen1 997 Turbo have remained strong. Boasting an extra 60bhp and more modern aesthetics, the 997 makes for an attractive option to those courting the famed Turbo experience, even though its forecast as an immediate investment isn’t quite as rosy – for now.

996 Turbo S side

The Turbo market has been squeezed as a consequence, though the upshot is there are currently plenty of options available to a buyer with around £40,000 to spend.

But while flames of the 996 v 997 Turbo debate continue to be fanned by respective owners, there is an oft-ignored yet particularly special car available for similar money: the 996 Turbo S.

Boasting a production run of just 1,500 units, the 996 Turbo S came at the very end of the 996 production cycle in 2005, and was given the fullhouse treatment of options.

996 Turbo S engine

The 996 Turbo S is powered by a 3.6-litre twin turbocharged engine with double overhead camshafts operating four valves per cylinder and dry sump lubrication, just like its 996 Turbo counterpart.

The engine is fitted with VarioCam Plus, a further development of the familiar VarioCam system, which changes both the intake camshaft timing (by as much as 25°) as well as the intake valve lift.

Fitted with bigger turbos as part of the X50 Powerkit – standard on the Turbo S – power was boosted to 450bhp and the car’s top speed broke through that magic 300km/h barrier, boasting a maximum of 190mph (307km/h) and placing it firmly in supercar territory.

To read our Porsche 996 Turbo S test drive in full, pick up Total 911 issue 132 in store today. Alternatively, order your copy online for home delivery or download it to your digital device now.

996 Turbo S driving

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