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Porsche 911 RSR Outlaw : Le Graal des atmos !

Dans la religion Porschiste classic, vous avez 2 prophéties ! Celle des turbos et celle des atmos. Pour les adeptes de la 1ère, le rêve ultime passe souvent par une 930 ou une 965. Pour les 2nd, c’est la RS… voir la RSR qui n’a jamais eu de version street legal. Mais heureusement il existe […]

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Porsche Spring Meeting 2017 : Quand Stuttgart s’invite au Castellet

Porsche Spring Meeting

Commençons par le commencement : qu’est-ce que le “Porsche Spring Meeting 2017” ? Une véritable « Porscherie » !

Cet article Porsche Spring Meeting 2017 : Quand Stuttgart s’invite au Castellet est apparu en premier sur The Automobilist.

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Porsche 911 Carrera RSR – Porn !

Si vous estimez qu’il n’y a rien de plus pur qu’une Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7, attendez alors de voir celle qui débarque… C’est sa petite soeur, son évolution mis à part que lorsque la 2.7 pouvait se déguster sur route ouverte, elle, elle est exclusivement réservée à la piste puisque c’est une RSR… Une […]

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Cet article Porsche 911 Carrera RSR – Porn ! est apparu en premier sur De l’essence dans mes veines.

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Opinion: Is the new 2017 Porsche 911 RSR really a 911?

“Surely that’s a Cayman, not a 911?” remarked one commenter on Total 911’s Facebook page last week when we reported on the official launch of the 2017 Porsche 911 RSR, Weissach’s radical new mid-engined racer.

As we all know, the Porsche 911 has always had its engine mounted aft of the rear wheels. From the early 2.0-litre cars right through to the latest 991 generation, the drivetrain layout has been one constant in the Neunelfer’s never-ending evolution.

The new GTE class contender completely breaks with that tradition, mounting the engine closer to the centre of the car, with the six-speed sequential gearbox now bolted behind the powerplant via a new magnesium casing.

2017-911-rsr-front

It still looks like a 911, and it still sounds like a 911. But is it really a 911?

I’ll admit that the general design sounds a lot like the mid-engined Cayman however, does that mean that the car designed to return the FIA WEC GT crown back to Weissach isn’t really a Porsche 911? Well, no.

Over the years, Porsche has always pushed the regulations’ boundaries in its various racing exploits, often using the 911 as its platform of choice. This has meant that many of the 911’s defining features have been tampered with in exchange for faster lap times.

For many, the idiosyncratic upright front wings are a 911 signature however, the Porsche 935 famously did away with them in pursuit of better aerodynamics. The ‘flachbau’ front end may have upset purists but there was no doubting that the 935 was a 911 at heart.

The Porsche 935 was a genuine 911 (under the skin) but it didn't look anything like the road cars.

The Porsche 935 was a genuine 911 (under the skin) but it didn’t look anything like the road cars.

Likewise, the 911 GT1 project – running from 1996 to 1998 – saw wholesale changes made to the Neunelfer’s chassis, lengthening it considerably and mounting the engine in the middle (sounds familiar) to provide a better weight balance.

Okay, we’ll admit that the Le Mans-winning GT1-98 (with its carbon fibre monocoque construction) was only a 911 in name but, the earlier versions shared some of their front-end design with the 993 road car.

More recently, the first generation 991 RSR – launched in 2013 – made the switch to double wishbone front suspension, replacing the MacPherson strut design that is used in the road cars (and has been since the 911’s inception in 1963).

The GT1 was the last Porsche 911 to feature the engine mounted amidships with the gearbox behind.

The GT1 was the last Porsche 911 to feature the engine mounted amidships with the gearbox behind.

Porsche 911s built by the factory to race in the toughest international arenas have, therefore, traditionally broken with tradition in pursuit of greater performance.

The new 2017 Porsche 911 RSR (for all the fuss its new engine layout has created) still shares its body shell with the current generation of road cars meaning that, unlike the GT1s of two decades ago, it still looks, unmistakeably, like a 911, and it’s still powered by a naturally aspirated flat six.

Rather than questioning whether this is really a Cayman, we should be celebrating that Porsche has decided to stick with the 911 as its RSR platform of choice because it shows that the board back in Zuffenhausen still understands how important the Neunelfer is to Porsche (both the company and the brand).

Do you agree with Josh? Is the new 2017 Porsche 911 RSR still a genuine 911? Join the debate in the comments below, or head to our Facebook and Twitter pages now.

The new 2017 Porsche 911 RSR's cockpit is an unfamiliar environment for most 911 drivers.

The new 2017 Porsche 911 RSR’s cockpit is an unfamiliar environment for most 911 drivers.

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2016 FIA WEC: Six Hours of Bahrain race report

While Audi dominated the LMP1 class in its final FIA World Endurance Championship race and the no. 2 Porsche 919 Hybrid’s sixth-place finish guaranteed Neel Jani, Marc Lieb and Romain Dumas a first world title, the real battle at the Six Hours of Bahrain was among the GTE ranks.

In the GTE-Am class, Abu Dhabi-Proton Racing guided the no. 88 Porsche 911 RSR to a second victory of the season after a non-stop battle with the no. 78 KCMG 911 RSR. The one-two was all the more remarkable as both cars started from the rear of the field.

In the first hour, it was actually the no. 86 Gulf Racing 911 RSR that led the charge for Porsche as Ben Barker, taking the start from fourth, spent the opening stint in second, chasing down the leading Larbre Competition Corvette.

Porsche 911 RSR (78), KCMG: Joel Camathias, Christian Ried, Wolf Henzler

The blue-and-orange RSR emerged from the pits ahead of the Chevrolet but, as hour one came to a close it was actually the no. 78 Porsche 911 that led the GTE-Am field having run longer into the race without taking a pit stop.

KCMG’s advantage would be wiped out moments after its first tyre-and-fuel stop though as a safety car period closed up the pack and allowed the Abu-Dhabi Proton car to make its own stop, gaining around 50 seconds as a result.

With factory ace, Patrick Long now behind the wheel (having taken over from Khaled Al Qubaisi), the no. 86 Porsche went on a charge as the American racer moved the Abu Dhabi-Proton RSR from fifth up to third in his first few laps.

Porsche 911 RSR (77), Dempsey Proton Racing: Richard Lietz, Michael Christensen

By the end of the second hour, Long had established a 25-second lead over the KCMG car (which still needed to pit to get back on sequence). From here, the no. 88 Porsche 911 RSR asserted its authority around the Bahrain International Circuit.

Strong stints by David Heinemeier Hansson and Al Qubaisi kept the challenge from the KCMG car – piloted by Wolf Henzler, Christian Ried and Joel Camathias – at bay before Long jumped back in the hot seat to bring the lead 911 RSR home and give the Abu Dhabi-Proton squad a second victory of the year.

Behind, the KCMG crew took second while Gulf Racing fought back well through the mid part of the race to narrowly miss out on a maiden WEC podium. Having dropped to last, the British team rallied to fourth place.

Porsche 911 RSR (86), Gulf Racing: Michael Wainwright, Adam Carroll, Ben Barker

While Long was obviously delighted to finish the year on a high, fellow factory driver, Henzler rued the intervention of the safety car: “We are delighted to be back on the podium, but we could have won today. The only safety car phase of the race cost us the victory. We simply weren’t able to make up the difference.”

In the GTE-Pro class, the Dempsey-Proton pairing of 2015 FIA WEC GT champion, Richard Lietz and Michael Christensen finished their challenging season with seventh in the no. 77 Porsche 911 RSR.

“Now it’s over and we can look forward to 2017 and the new 911 RSR,” explained Christensen after a year in which duo’s best result was fourth place at the Six Hours of Spa.

For all the latest Porsche race reports and news, check out our dedicated motorsport section now.

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