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Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid

Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid (2019)

A quelques jours des débuts de la première Porsche électrique, le Cayenne entend démontrer qu’il n’a rien à craindre sur le point des performances, tout en étant lui aussi plus vertueux. Voici les 680 ch du Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid. Avec la disparition des modèles diesel, Porsche pousse les feux sur l’électrification de la […]

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Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid : la plus puissante des Panamera (Galerie, vidéo)

Porsche Panamera Turbo S

La Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid sera officiellement présentée par le constructeur de Stuttgart lors du prochain salon de Genève qui ouvrira ses portes dès le 7 mars à la presse.Fait surprenant pour Porsche mais finalement totalement dans l’air du temps automobile cette nouvelle déclinaison de la Panamera II constituera désormais, la proposition la plus […]

Cet article Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid : la plus puissante des Panamera (Galerie, vidéo) est apparu en premier sur The Automobilist.

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Porsche Working on 911 Plug-in Hybrid, Not a Full EV

2017 Porsche 911 Carrera

Porsche is working on a plug-in-hybrid version of the next-generation 911, but we’re told that a pure EV hasn’t moved beyond the planning stage. Instead, the only EV in Porsche’s near future is the production version of the Mission E concept the company has already announced it is building.

Porsche Mission E concept

The company’s commitment to keeping six-cylinder engines at the heart of the 911 has led to the development of a part-electric powertrain capable of meeting increasingly tough fuel-economy and emissions standards around the world.

“We are working on different solutions,” Erhard Mössle, engineering boss for the 911 Turbo, Carrera 4, and Targa, told us at the Detroit auto show. “We are developing a pure-electric car like the Mission E, and of course we are discussing plug-in solutions as well for the 911.”

Indeed, doing more than just discussing, with Mössle confirming that we will almost certainly see a 911 with a plug, but not until the next-generation model arrives around 2020.

“I think that takes some time to bring to market, with the packaging problems of the car,” he said. “There are a lot of problems to solve before [then].”

Mössle also admitted that the need to accommodate both the size and the mass of a battery pack is one of the main drivers in the engineering of the next 911. “We are fighting hard,” he said, “especially as we are discussing plug-in hybrids, then there’s the battery weight.”

However, despite reports elsewhere, Mössle downplayed the notion of a pure-electric 911: “When you saw the Mission E concept, delete two doors and you can imagine how such a car could look. But if that happens it’s very far in the future.”

Which is auto-industry executive-speak for “probably never.”

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Porsche 911 News: 991 Goes Turbo, 992 to Get Plug-in Option

911

The next-gen Porsche 911, due to be launched about four to five years from now, will most likely be available as a plug-in hybrid, according to sources familiar with the project. Internally called the 992, the fully redesigned model will be powered by turbocharged flat-six engines; four-cylinder models are possible, but an unlikely option.

The plug-in hybrid will draw from technologies developed for other Porsche models, such as the next-generation Panamera. It will allow Porsche to cut fuel consumption and emissions dramatically—maybe not so much in real life, but in the European emissions testing that favors electrified vehicles. The 992 will keep its unique rear-engine layout, which creates challenges in vehicle dynamics, but allows for a rear-seat compartment, and is demanded by 911 purists.

While work on the 992 is still in its early stages, today’s 911 (known as the 991) is set to receive a facelift later this year. It will lose the naturally aspirated flat-six currently offered in the Carrera and Carrera S, to be replaced by turbocharged flat-six engines. The seven-speed manual transmission will continue to be offered on those entry-level models, but more powerful versions stay with the seven-speed PDK dual-cutch automatic.

The decision to abort the manual box on the GT3 was controversial, but for the time being, the automatic is all you get on the GT3 and its derivatives. The manual-equipped Cayman GT4, however, proves there is a learning process going on at Porsche. If a manual ever does return to the faster 911 models, we have a request: Go back to six speeds.

Stylistically, changes to the second phase of the 991—the many variants of which will be launched sequentially, not all at once—are understood to be mild. They pertain to the rear end mostly, which has to be modified for the new turbos’ specific cooling needs.

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