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Porsche Cayenne Coupé : le « SUV 911 » à l’essai

Les SUV sont partout et les constructeurs de prestige n’ont pas loupé ce « virage automobile ». Depuis 2003, Porsche rencontre ainsi le succès avec son Cayenne mais, il a fallu attendre 2019 avant de voir débarquer le Porsche Cayenne Coupé. Alors, le dernier-né de la marque de Zuffenhausen est-il à la hauteur de « l’excellence Porsche » tel […]

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PCCD: Larry ten Voorde wins the race at Most in the Czech Republic

Larry ten Voorde continues his winning streak in the Porsche Carrera Cup Deutschland: At the Autodrom Most in the Czech Republic, the Dutchman celebrated his third win of the season.

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Man Crashes Cayenne Into Porsche Dealership Because They Messed Up His Panamera Order

We’ve all heard this story before, right? Man orders a quarter million dollar Panamera Sport Turismo, Taiwanese Porsche dealer delivers him a car that doesn’t have all of the options he ordered, man tries to cancel the order if they won’t get him the options he ordered, Porsche dealer tells him he will forfeit his $75,000 deposit if he cancels the order, man drives his other Porsche through the front doors of the Porsche dealer.

Okay, so that’s not such a common narrative thread, but in this case that’s exactly what happened. According to a report in the Taiwan News, itself a retelling of a story in a Taiwanese breaking news Facebook group, a 42 year old man named Chu was irate with the service and treatment he’d received purchasing another Porsche from his local dealer, located on a busy Wenxin Road in Taichung City. Statements obtained from Chu indicate that he’d placed an order for a Panamera Sport Turismo in January of 2017. In Taiwan, the base price of a new Sport Turismo is NT$5.98 million (just over $200,000), and the one he’d ordered had all of the bells and whistles, inflating the price up to NT$7.46 million.

When the Porsche was delivered without the optional PDCC he’d ordered, Chu was upset, but not irrational. He wanted to return the Sport Turismo so he could buy the Porsche he had intended to drive in the first place. The dealer told him his deposit was non-negotiable, and they’d told the man that he needed to pay his outstanding debts on the car. That was when he decided to retaliate by doing a completely asinine thing. As you can see from this video of the exterior of the building, Chu drove his Cayenne up onto the sidewalk and through the glass front doors of the dealership.

Once he’d broken through, it was clear that there were two innocent women sitting at the dealership’s reception desk. Not wanting to actually hurt anyone, he waited until they had moved out of the way before bashing the front of his Cayenne into the desk not once, but twice. While he broke the front window and probably damaged a lot of the furniture, it does not appear that any dealer inventory was hurt in the process. Chu was arrested for the destruction of property, the dealership will rebuild, and no resolution has been made. A hot head is never a clear thinking head.

 
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Nouvelle Porsche Panamera 2016 : Toutes les infos, photos et vidéos

Nouvelle Porsche Panamera 2016 : Toutes les infos, photos et vidéos

La nouvelle grande Porsche s’annonçait depuis des semaines à coup de teasers et même, ces derniers jours, de fuites incontrôlées mais hier soir la firme de Stuttgart a révélé son nouveau porte-étendard : voici la nouvelle Porsche Panamera 2016. Et voici tout ce que nous pouvons vous en dire à ce jour.

Cet article Nouvelle Porsche Panamera 2016 : Toutes les infos, photos et vidéos est apparu en premier sur The Automobilist.

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Suspension: A Porsche 911 history

Replacing the 356, the original Porsche 911’s suspension setup was much more modern than its predecessor. Up front, the 901 utilised a Boge-built MacPherson strut, lower wishbone and 19mm-diameter longitudinal torsion bar, mounted off the back of wishbone’s rear leg.

At the rear, a semi-trailing arm setup was brought in. The inner arm mounted just off the nose of the gearbox, while the outer, pivoting arm connected to the chassis, twisting a 23mm lateral torsion bar on either side.

While the front was given a 13mm anti-roll bar, the rear would not gain such roll control until the introduction of the Porsche 911S in 1966 (a car that also offered adjustable Koni hydraulic dampers).

As part of the 1969 B-Series, the 911’s rear trailing arms were lengthened by 61mm, yielding a near-identical increase in the sports car’s wheelbase (helping to reduce the rearward weight bias). However, this was the most major 911 suspension change until the arrival of the 964 in 1989.

964 rear suspension

The original torsion bar design didn’t leave enough space for the front driveshafts in the 964 C4. Zuffenhausen therefore made the move to coilover MacPherson struts, while the front wheels could move fore and aft slightly, lessening bump steer and steering wheel feedback.

At the rear, the damper strut also featured a coil over spring however, the biggest change was made to the design of the trailing arm assembly that now featured an additional, pivoting link in place of the inner arm.

Combined with a radially elasticated bush in the outer mounting, the ‘Weissach effect’ (pioneered on the 928) helped to reverse the semi-trailing arms naturally tendency to toe out under lateral loads, a trait that created the early car’s fearsome reputation for lift-off oversteer.

The Porsche 993 made use of a similar effect, albeit it via a vastly different construction. The semi-trailing arm design that had evolved from the original 901 finally made its departure while the MacPherson struts remained up front (now lighter thanks to greater use of aluminium).

996 rear suspension

This general layout has survived through the 996 generation right through to the latest Porsche 991, with Zuffenhausen’s engineers focussing predominantly on electronic controls during the water-cooled era.

In 2004, with the launch of the 997, Porsche unveiled the Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) variable rate dampers before developing Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC), a system to preload the anti-roll bars, for the launch of the 991 generation.

The latest suspension development has been the advent of rear-wheel steering, initially launched on the 991 Turbo, GT3 and GT3 RS models. At speeds under 31mph, the system helps to increase agility while over 50mph the electronically actuated rear toe links help to improve stability.

Such has been the success of rear-axle steering, it has now been offered as an option on Carrera S, Carrera 4S and Targa 4S versions of the latest Porsche 991.2 while PASM is now a standard feature on the new generation of Neunelfer.

991 rear suspension

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