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Porsche 911 Cabriolets: G-series v 964 v 993

Yorkshire dry-stone walls have a very useful application that was never intended by the original builders several centuries ago. In addition to providing the unique signature style that is the Yorkshire landscape while also containing livestock over the centuries, they also make a superb surface to echo back the bark of an air-cooled 911 engine. Combine that with the final days of a long, hot summer and a trio of Cabriolet 911s – all with the hoods folded as they truly should be – and we have the perfect recipe for a great day’s driving and a chance to investigate the appeal of the open-top 911 experience. Will we enjoy a day in the sunshine, or will the bumpy Yorkshire lanes highlight the compromise of 911 body stiffness?

Heading out of the market town of Malton, I’m at the rear of the convoy in the 993 Cabriolet. The air is filled with the bass burble of air-cooled exhaust tones at low RPM, the whiff of that unique 911 aroma of hot oil and burned hydrocarbons from the two cars ahead spilling over into the interior, the sun providing a warmth on my face that is still pleasant so late in the summer. Good times.

Turning left down some of our favourite B-roads, the sunshine dapples the tree-lined road ahead… it’s time to increase the pace. We’re staying away from the vast, open moorland of the North Yorkshire Moors today, instead staying on the lower ground of the Vale of York and the twisting, turning B-roads that keep hands and feet busy as the road snakes between those ancient dry-stone walls. The three cars span an eight-year period of 911 evolution, from the torsion bars and impact bumpers of 1989, through the transformation of 1990 with power assistance and coil springs, to the final development of the air-cooled Porsche 911 in the 993.

Without a doubt everyone will have a personal favourite. Indeed, as we gather the cars together for photographs, the debate commences even before photographer Alistair has rigged his first flash head. The most visually arresting is the 1989 Super Sport in Guards red. For me this car is the epitome of that period of Porsche sales. The hedonistic period when excess was encouraged and every businessman and city trader in the City of London had to have a giant Motorola brick phone, expensive Italian shoes and matching briefcase, plus a Guards red Porsche 911. For the full-on effect it had to be the Turbo body, Fuchs alloys and the whaletail spoiler. And if you really wished to be publicly on display through the city streets, then the Cabriolet ensured that you shared your cellphone conversation with everyone around you as you discussed the day’s share trading at the traffic lights.

So how does the drive compare almost 30 years later? We hand over the keys to the 993 that we arrived in and swap to the cream seats of the Super Sport. Instantly I’m missing the powered steering as we shuffle back and forth to leave the photo location, the non-standard steering wheel not helping with its smaller diameter, though once rolling along the country lanes it’s much less of an issue. The road is initially bumpy, and several things become apparent. Firstly there is indeed that flex and shake from around the windscreen area that I recall from previous drives. Secondly, despite there only being a few years between the registration dates, the 1989 car does feel as though it’s from a much older generation of Porsche.

That’s not to say it’s a bad car – far from it. And as the road smooths out and widens we’re able to enjoy the bark of the 3.2 engine and use the echo board of Yorkshire’s dry-stone walls to enjoy some rather delightful pops and crackles on the downshifts. Through the avenue of trees we return to our location, and I swap into the black 964.

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2018 RM Sotheby’s Porsche Atlanta Auction Results

In what was possibly the largest and most talked about single-marque auction ever, RM Sotheby’s pulled off an incredible feat. The Porsche Auction was held at PCNA headquarters in Atlanta this weekend, and there were a few takeaways from the event that made headlines in our minds. First, it’s important to remember that Project Gold is more than a regular 993 Turbo S, it’s a one-of-a-kind factory-built brand new 993 Turbo S with lots of unique visual cues and media attention. Regardless of all that, it’s absolutely mind-blowing that it reached 3.1 million dollars. Second, there are some big moves in value coming for the transaxle cars. With a 924 trading hands for over 50,000 dollars, these cars are finally getting the attention they deserve.

I’m trying something new with the realized prices you see below. Prices falling under their pre-auction estimate will be highlighted in red, while those that exceed their estimate will be highlighted green. Any falling within their estimate range will remain black. Enjoy!

Total Porsches Offered: 68 | Total Porsches Sold: 57 | Total Porsche Sales: $24,974,740 | Sell Through Rate: 83.8%

Lot 155 – Porsche 356 Speedster Junior Children’s Car – Pre-Auction Estimate: $18,000 – 25,000

Realized: $9,000

Lot 156 – Porsche 550 Spyder Junior Children’s Car – Pre-Auction Estimate: $18,000 – 25,000

Realized: $7,800

Lot 157 – Porsche 904 GTS Junior Children’s Car – Pre-Auction Estimate: $20,000 – 30,000

Realized: $9,600

Lot 158 – Porsche 917 Junior Children’s Car – Pre-Auction Estimate: $50,000 – 60,000

Realized: $31,200

Lot 161 – 1956 Porsche 356A Training Car – Pre-Auction Estimate: $100,000 – 150,000

Realized: $112,000

Lot 162 – 1984 Porsche 944 – Pre-Auction Estimate: $35,000 – 45,000

Realized: $29,120

Lot 163 – 1994 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Turbo Look – Pre-Auction Estimate: $125,000 – 150,000

Realized: $117,600

Lot 164 – 1994 Porsche 928 GTS – Pre-Auction Estimate: $90,000 – 120,000

Realized: $112,000

Lot 165 – 1989 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe – Pre-Auction Estimate: $125,000 – 175,000

Realized: $196,000

Lot 166 – 1969 Porsche 911E Coupe 2.0L – Pre-Auction Estimate: $70,000 – 90,000

Realized: $81,200

Lot 167 – 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S – Pre-Auction Estimate: $300,000 – 400,000

Realized: $434,000

Lot 168 -1971 Porsche 914/6 – Pre-Auction Estimate: $100,000 – 125,000

Realized: $145,600

Lot 169 – 1995 Porsche 911 Cup 3.8 RSR Evo – Pre-Auction Estimate: $250,000 – 275,000

Realized: Reserve Not Met

Lot 170 – 2006 Porsche 911 Carrera S Club Coupe – Pre-Auction Estimate: $120,000 – 160,000

Realized: $151,200

Lot 171 -1971 Porsche 911E Targa 2.2L – Pre-Auction Estimate: $125,000 – 150,000

Realized: $67,200

Lot 172 – 1988 Porsche 911 Turbo S Slant Nose Coupe – Pre-Auction Estimate: $250,000 – 300,000

Realized: $307,500

Lot 173 – 1958 Porsche 356A 1600 Super Speedster Barn Find – Pre-Auction Estimate: $125,000 – 150,000

Realized: $307,500

Lot 174 -1965 Porsche 911 – Pre-Auction Estimate: $200,000 – 250,000

Realized: $246,400

Lot 175 – 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7L Lightweight – Pre-Auction Estimate: $875,000 – 1,100,000

Realized: $1,022,500

Lot 176 – 1977 Porsche 911 Turbo Carrera – Pre-Auction Estimate: $140,000 – 180,000

Realized: $151,200

Lot 177 – 1993 Porsche 911 RS America – Pre-Auction Estimate: $150,000 – 200,000

Realized: $162,400

Lot 178 – 1980 Porsche 935 Kremer K4 – Pre-Auction Estimate: $850,000 – 1,100,000

Realized: $885,000

Lot 179 – 1996 Porsche 911 Carrera RS – Pre-Auction Estimate: $500,000 – 600,000

Realized: $390,000

Lot 180 – 1968 Porsche 911L Coupe – Pre-Auction Estimate: $125,000 – 150,000

Realized: $114,800

Lot 181 – 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR 2.8L – Pre-Auction Estimate: $2,400,000 – 2,800,000

Realized: Reserve Not Met

Lot 182 – 1996 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S – Pre-Auction Estimate: $100,000 – 125,000

Realized: $117,600

Lot 183 – 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0L – Pre-Auction Estimate: $800,000 – 1,000,000

Realized: $566,000

Lot 184 – 1951 Porsche 356 Split Window Cabriolet 1300 – Pre-Auction Estimate: $560,000 – 800,000

Realized: Reserve Not Met

Lot 185 – 2015 Porsche 918 Spyder – Pre-Auction Estimate: $1,400,000 – 1,600,000

Realized: $1,407,500

Lot 186 – 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 3.8 – Pre-Auction Estimate: $175,000 – 200,000

Realized: $196,000

Lot 187 – 1963 Porsche 356 B 1600 Sunroof Coupe – Pre-Auction Estimate: $90,000 – 120,000

Realized: $117,600

Lot 188 – 1994 Porsche 911 Speedster – Pre-Auction Estimate: $200,000 – 250,000

Realized: $190,400

Lot 189 – 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo – Pre-Auction Estimate: $225,000 – 275,000

Realized: $210,000

Lot 190 – 1951 Porsche 356 Pre-A Split-Window Coupe – Pre-Auction Estimate: $600,000 – 800,000

Realized: Reserve Not Met

Lot 191 – 1985 Porsche 959 Prototype – Pre-Auction Estimate: $1,300,000 – 1,600,000

Realized: $1,000,000

Lot 192 – 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7L Touring – Pre-Auction Estimate: $650,000 – 750,000

Realized: $698,000

Lot 193 – 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S X85 Slant Nose « Flachbau » – Pre-Auction Estimate: $600,000 – 750,000

Realized: $560,000

Lot 194 – 1969 Porsche 911E 2.0L Coupe – Pre-Auction Estimate: $125,000 – 150,000

Realized: $123,200

Lot 195 – 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS – Pre-Auction Estimate: $175,000 – 225,000

Realized: $215,600

Lot 196 – 1985 Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar – Pre-Auction Estimate: $3,000,000 – 3,400,000

Realized: $5,945,000

Lot 197 – 1960 Porsche 356 B Coupe Super 90 – Pre-Auction Estimate: $140,000 – 160,000

Realized: $190,400

Lot 198 – 1989 Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet – Pre-Auction Estimate: $225,000 – 275,000

Realized: $207,200

Lot 199 – 2011 Porsche 911 GT2 RS – Pre-Auction Estimate: $700,000 – 800,000

Realized: $538,500

Lot 200 – 1983 Porsche 956 Group C – Pre-Auction Estimate: $5,250,000 – 6,750,000

Realized: Reserve Not Met

Lot 201 – 1970 Porsche 911S Coupe 2.2L – Pre-Auction Estimate: $180,000 – 220,000

Realized: $193,200

Lot 202 – 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS – Pre-Auction Estimate: $600,000 – 700,000

Realized: Reserve Not Met

Lot 203 – 1956 Porsche 356 A Speedster 1600 Super – Pre-Auction Estimate: $500,000 – 600,000

Realized: $494,500

Lot 204 – 1970 Porsche 914/6 – Pre-Auction Estimate: $80,000 – 100,000

Realized: $95,200

Lot 205 – 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7L Prototype – Pre-Auction Estimate: $1,250,000 – 1,500,000

Realized: $1,325,000

Lot 206 – 1985 Porsche 911 Turbo Slant Nose Coupe – Pre-Auction Estimate: $250,000 – 300,000

Realized: $246,400

Lot 207 – 2004 Porsche Carrera GT – Pre-Auction Estimate: $650,000 – 750,000

Realized: Pulled From Auction

Lot 208 – 1968 Porsche 911 Sportomatic Coupe – Pre-Auction Estimate: $225,000 – 275,000

Realized: Reserve Not Met

Lot 209 – 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S – Pre-Auction Estimate: $775,000 – 950,000

Realized: Reserve Not Met

Lot 210 – 1967 Porsche 911S 2.0L Coupe – Pre-Auction Estimate: $175,000 – 225,000

Realized: $229,600

Lot 211 – 2008 Porsche 911 GT2 – Pre-Auction Estimate: $260,000 – 300,000

Realized: $235,000

Lot 212 – 1958 Porsche 356A Speedster – Pre-Auction Estimate: $300,000 – 350,000

Realized: $280,000

Lot 213 – 2007 Porsche 911 GT3 RS – Pre-Auction Estimate: $260,000 – 300,000

Realized: Reserve Not Met

Lot 214 – 1968 Porsche 911 Soft-Window Targa – Pre-Auction Estimate: $170,000 – 190,000

Realized: $95,200

Lot 215 – 1975 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR 3.0L – Pre-Auction Estimate: $2,000,000 – 2,200,000

Realized: Reserve Not Met

Lot 216 – 1960 Porsche 356B Super 90 Cabriolet – Pre-Auction Estimate: $160,000 – 190,000

Realized: $168,000

Lot 217 – 1996 Porsche 911 GT2 – Pre-Auction Estimate: $800,000 – 1,200,000

Realized: $643,000

Lot 218 – 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6L – Pre-Auction Estimate: $150,000 – 200,000

Realized: $184,800

Lot 219 – 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet – Pre-Auction Estimate: $120,000 – 140,000

Realized: $112,000

Lot 220 – 2018 Porsche 911 Turbo Classic Series (993) « Project Gold » – No Estimate Provided

Realized: $3,415,000

Lot 221 – 1980 Porsche 924 – Pre-Auction Estimate: $30,000 – 40,000

Realized: $53,760

Lot 222 – 1990 Porsche 944 S2 Cabriolet – Pre-Auction Estimate: $40,000 – 60,000

Realized: $29,120

Lot 223 – 1979 Porsche 928 – Pre-Auction Estimate: $60,000 – 80,000

Realized: $57,120

Lot 224 – 1959 Porsche Diesel Junior 108 K Tractor – Pre-Auction Estimate: $30,000 – 40,000

Realized: $51,520

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White House Reportedly Seeking Ban On All German Luxury Car Imports, Including Porsche

We don’t normally report on political topics. FLATSIXES exists solely to bring you the best coverage of Porsche cars and the community that surrounds them. Especially in today’s highly polarized political climate, it wouldn’t normally be in our wheelhouse to touch on international trade conflicts. However, when the topic being discussed is a flat out blockage of all German luxury car imports, we are obligated to provide that horrifying news to our readers. Regardless of your political affiliations, we are forced to assume that if you’re reading a Porsche enthusiast site, you might not like the thought of Porsche disappearing from our shores. According to a report by Germany’s WirtschaftsWoche magazine, during French President Emanuel Macron’s state visit in April, President Donald J. Trump informed Macron of a plan to do just that. While no exact quotes are given, Trump allegedly said he would maintain this ban until such day as no Mercedes Benz models could be found on Fifth Avenue in his home New York City.

This protectionist, allegedly America First, kind of policy is not exactly out of character for Trump, as he’s previously alluded to those same Mercedes on Fifth Avenue in a January 2017 interview quoted in German magazine Bild. “When you walk down Fifth Avenue, everybody has a Mercedes-Benz parked in front of his house. You were very unfair to the U.S.A. It isn’t mutual. How many Chevrolets do you see in Germany? Not many, maybe none, you don’t see anything at all over there. It’s a one-way street.” While Mercedes has been singled out, and BMW has been mentioned by name in the past as well, the alleged policy could certainly effect all German imports equally. Just over a week ago, for example, Trump broached the idea of heavy import tariffs on cars that could reach as high as 25%.

 

While the policy is ostensibly intended to save American auto manufacturer jobs, what are the knock on effects to potentially closing over 800 Porsche dealerships nationwide? Would Porsche be forced to build an assembly plant on US shores to avoid the import ban? If a punitive tariff was put in place, would you pay an extra 25% to get a new Porsche? That would bump the base price of a new GT2 RS up to nearly $375,000! Give us your thoughts in the comments below.

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Augmented Reality ‘Tech Live Look’ Program Is Coming To A Porsche Service Center Near You

Following successful beta tests and pilot programs of software introduced late last year, Porsche dealers across the US are rolling out new « Tech Live Look » processes for their technicians to use in the diagnosis process. This system connects your local Porsche dealership tech remotely with specific systems experts using ODG R-7 smartglasses and a software platform developed in conjunction with Atheer, Inc. The hope is that this software will assist technicians in reducing diagnostic and service resolution times by as much as 40%. The program is expected to be rolled out slowly, first to three dealerships this week. The remaining 186 US Porsche dealers under the Porsche Cars North America banner will be gradually updated to use the software, and the hope is that all of them will have this capability by the close of next year.

Klaus Zellmer, President and CEO of PCNA:

“Tech Live Look is the kind of digital innovation Porsche values because it raises the quality of the customer experience. By solving issues faster, our dealer partners can get their customers back into cars with less disruption. And our overall service quality increases as we share expertise more efficiently between our experts and dealer technicians.”

Until this software was introduced, technicians would frequently have to deal with complex or unusual repair requests through a series of back-and-forth messages with PCNA’s technical support team. This process usually took a while, as it incorporated potentially dozens of E-mails, instant messages, phone calls, photographs, and potentially escalate to on-site visits by designated Field Technical Managers to diagnose. It was a convoluted process that certainly needed streamlining.

How does the technology work? Until now, a complex or unusual technical issue could go back and forth repeatedly between a dealership and the PCNA technical support team. It could take multiple electronic messages, phone calls, photos, and even on-site visits by Porsche’s Field Technical Managers to identify and diagnose the issue for repair. Porsche’s technical support team in Atlanta will now be able to tap into a live video feed through the AR glasses, allowing them to see the same things the technician sees. The two-person team can then open and share documents, like technical bulletins and schematic drawings of the systems in play. The technician, even when not on a call with tech support, can open and view documents while working with full function of their hands. There are many ways in which this new program should streamline the repair of your Porsche, getting you back behind the wheel quicker than before!

The automotive industry has been experimenting with augmented reality technical support, but analysts say Tech Live Look is the first application at scale in U.S. auto repair.

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Porsche’s EV Network Will Charge You For A Charge

Mission E Cross Turismo Front

Tesla rose to notoriety, at least in part, by building a huge cross-country network of super-fast charging stations, and offering their customers free use of those stations for a limited time. It was a partially a marketing exercise to draw in clients with inexpensive operating costs. Even now that Tesla has saddled their entry-level Model 3 customers with charging costs, and has begun to roll back those charging subsidies for Model S and Model X owners, they are still giving their customers a charge for essentially the cost of the electricity. Tesla does not believe in operating their Supercharger system as a profit center.

Porsche, however, feels differently

As we reported last month, Porsche will be installing 800V ‘Turbo Charge’ stations for EV customers at each and every US dealership. Outside of Porsche dealers and certain destination locations, Porsche’s infrastructure will rely on Volkswagen/Audi’s Level 2 charger system, which is being installed concurrent with the Turbo Charge stations. As opposed to Tesla, Porsche wants their Turbo Charge stations to be profitable within three years of installation, creating more revenue for dealerships and for Porsche Cars North America.

When asked by GearBrain if Porsche would operate their charging stations as a profit resource, Porsche’s Lutz Meschke reportedly laughed before replying, « Yes, we want to earn money with the new products and services. Of course. Yes. » Meschke went on to explain that he felt Tesla’s model was untenable, reminding everyone that it was only free for a while. He then replied, somewhat confusingly, « Yes we try to [bill from day one] of course. We can invest in the beginning but after two or three years you have to be profitable with the new services, of course.« 

If you were hoping to substitute some of the cost of your new Porsche EV with a non-existent fill-up bill, then you’ll be disappointed to find out that Porsche allegedly plans to charge prices similar to a tank of gasoline for an electric re-fuel. Where Tesla’s customers are paying cents on the dollar to re-up their range, Porsche expects folks to shell out big bucks for their helping of volts. Does this change how you feel about Mission E?

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