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Ten top photos from Total 911 issue 142

If you’ve already got your copy of the new Total 911 issue, you’ll be in a similar quandary to us: just where do you start? There are so many incredible Porsche 911 stories in issue 142 that this has to be one of our greatest ever issues, no?

For those of you still waiting to get your copy, here are ten of our favourite photos from the new issue to give you a visual run through and hopefully whet your appetite:

Porsche's technological tour de force - the 959 - puts through its paces as we celebrate the supercar's 30th anniversary.

Porsche’s technological tour de force – the 959 – puts through its paces as we celebrate the supercar’s 30th anniversary.

Can turbocharging save the new 911 Targa? A road trip to the end of the UK aught to find out...

Can turbocharging save the new 911 Targa? A road trip to the end of the UK aught to find out…

The Porsche 959's legacy is explored with a turbocharged twin test of the 964 Turbo X88 and the 993 Turbo S.

The Porsche 959’s legacy is explored with a turbocharged twin test of the 964 Turbo X88 and the 993 Turbo S.

Fancy buying a Porsche 996.2 GT3? We've got everything you need to know in our latest ultimate guide.

Fancy buying a Porsche 996.2 GT3? We’ve got everything you need to know in our latest ultimate guide.

2016 marks 50 years of the Porsche 911 at Le Mans. We chart the Neunelfer's incredible La Sarthe successes in issue 142.

2016 marks 50 years of the Porsche 911 at Le Mans. We chart the Neunelfer’s incredible La Sarthe successes in issue 142.

The modern Porsche world is a minefield of acronyms. We explain what the ever-growing list of them really means.

The modern Porsche world is a minefield of acronyms. We explain what the ever-growing list of them really means.

Wolf Henzler sits down with Total 911 to discuss his careers as one of the stalwarts of Porsche's stellar factory driver line-up.

Wolf Henzler sits down with Total 911 to discuss his careers as one of the stalwarts of Porsche’s stellar factory driver line-up.

Go behind the scenes at Carrera Classic as we discover a collection with a difference deep in rural Finland.

Go behind the scenes at Carrera Classic as we discover a collection with a difference deep in rural Finland.

30 years on and the Porsche 959 is as thrilling as ever. Lee gets behind the wheel for our issue 142 cover feature.

30 years on and the Porsche 959 is as thrilling as ever. Lee gets behind the wheel for our issue 142 cover feature.

To read all these incredible features, pick up Total 911 issue 142 in store today. Alternatively, you can order your copy online for home delivery, or download it straight to your digital device now.

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Sales spotlight: Porsche 997 Turbo 9exx 4.2

So far in our weekly sales spotlight series we’ve featured an array of Porsches so chosen for their limited production run or unique history. Believe it or not, this week’s 997 Turbo entry follows those same principles albeit packaged in a completely different way.

That’s because this 997 Turbo is a true one-of-a-kind with a build history totalling more than £45,000 for the engine alone and resulting in a car that would leave the Porsche 918, McLaren P1 and Ferrari LaFerrari eating dust all the way to 200mph. Got your attention? Time, then, to take a look at the 997 Turbo 9eXX 4.2 in closer detail.

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The car started life as a Gen1 997 Turbo, which you’ll know was good enough for 480hp and 620Nm max torque while cosseting the driver in lavish surroundings. Well, the 9eXX 4.2 looks just like any other Gen1 997 Turbo from outside and even from the driver’s seat, but pop the decklid and you’ll start to see some telltale signs of a flat six that’s been fettled. A lot.

The Mezger engine’s capacity has been increased from 3.6-litres and a mighty 4.2, and has been “extensively modified internally to cope with over 1000hp.” This consists of custom con rods, studs, gaskets, heads that have been ported, machined and o-ringed. Other components include titanium valve springs and reground cams. The cost of the engine tune was an eye-watering £45,000, don’t forget.

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Now, Nine Excellence is no stranger to big 911 builds – in fact, they’re one of the best, duly taking Best 911 Tuner at the 2015 Total 911 Awards. You can therefore rest assured as to the integrity of the work undertaken here. That’s why the Mezger’s entire intake system has been reworked too, with custom GT3586 Hybrid turbos to 9eXX specification and with a switchable sports exhaust system installed for good measure, too.

9e’s online advert continues: “The car has four different power settings at a touch of a button and has methanol/water injector programmed automatically for top power setting. It runs on Vpower99 on a day to day basis although top performance is achieved on higher octane fuel.” The gearbox is Tiptronic, but don’t let that put you off – it’s been upgraded to hold 1,300nm of torque and shifts twice as fast as a standard box. In addition, the driveshafts have been upgraded to enable hard launches.

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To finish this truly unique and mouth-watering build, the suspension has been upgraded to Bilstein B16 Damptronics, with a full RSS Tarmac Series and custom geometry. And as for stopping? You’ve got Girodiscs and Pagid29 pads to bring this car back to sane speeds when needed. The car has covered just 2,000 miles since its rebuild and, for obvious reasons, the price is POA.

With the top speed limited to 232mph, the 9eXX 4.2 is a brilliantly ludicrous build that caters for those who truly like to live life to the full. For more information on this electrifying 997 Turbo, visit the Nine Excellence website or Facebook page

 

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Lee’s 996 Carrera diary: performance brake upgrade

You may have read from my last 996 Carrera diary entry that I was on the lookout for some twisty roads after having the excellent Bilstein PSS10s fitted. Well, it happened: I took the 911 up to Scotland for a weekend touring from Pitlochry, just above Edinburgh, across to the Isle of Skye and back down via Glencoe and Loch Lomond.

Returning to the south coast, I realised two things. First, I’d by now accumulated 5,000 miles of driving (including one track day!) in the Carrera 4 since I bought it in February, which was the point at which I’d previously said I’d treat the 996 to an oil change. Second, my brakes were crap, and needed a change.

before after

My 996 had a major service (including the obligatory oil and filter change) just before I bought the car, but I’ve since been wilfully advised by a number of specialists to change the oil at an increased rate over 996 factory service intervals, just to be on the safe side. Considering the M96 engine’s reputation with IMS issues as a case in point, I figured for the cost of a few litres of Mobil 1 and an oil filter, it’s a price worth paying. Having fresh oil will keep the engine optimally lubricated and protected, and of course there’s a chance when extracting the old oil to check for significant detritus that could hint at imminent catastrophe from an IMS failure (even though the reality is, by this stage, the news isn’t going to be good anyway!).

I booked the car in to RPM Technik to carry out the oil change. I always favour RPM when it comes to service and maintenance, and not just because that’s where I purchased the car from; the 996 911 is a real favourite at RPM and Ollie and Darren, two of the company’s directors, have 996s themselves, which means genuine empathy is guaranteed for any work undertaken. For an owner such as myself, that means a lot.

oil

Having my car on the ramps served as a good time to upgrade the brakes, and here I went for EBC discs and pads all round (I brought these along on the day and Ollie agreed to fit them with a labour charge). EBC’s Yellowstuff pads appealed as they’re designed for fast road and occasional track use, which typifies what I use my 996 Carrera for. The discs are cast iron and made to OEM specification here in the UK, complete with drilled slots to aid heat dissipation.

The difference, already, is positively startling. I previously had to really jump on the middle pedal to get my tired factory brakes to scrub any speed, and even then brake feel was minimal (I had brake lines renewed when I bought the car and calliper pistons checked so this wasn’t a question of hydraulics). It wasn’t confidence inspiring at all.

pads

Even though I’m still bedding in the EBC brakes – I’ve done circa 400 miles thus far – the merits of the high-friction surface on the face of Yellowstuff pads is giving me a confidence in stopping ability that should always have come with a 320hp 911 weighing 1,430 kilos. Brake pedal feel is also noticeably increased, too, for added inspiration at the wheel.

EBC claim the pads’ high friction surface improves brake effect by 30-40%, which I’d say is absolutely spot on, and they’re still very capable even from cold. EBC also promise me there’s no such ‘fall off’ from heavy brake use and while I’m yet to significantly test that, a track day at Brands Hatch in two weeks should make for a worthy baptism of fire. So far then I’m pleasantly satisfied with the performance of the brake upgrade – just as well, as stopping is important!

wheel

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video: Ride on board in the new Porsche 991 R

Earlier this week we gave you our video verdict of the scintillating new 991 R. Perhaps Porsche’s best-ever Neunelfer, the limited-numbers R has captured the imagination of enthusiasts all over the world for the sheer purity of its drive.

Now, in similar zest, we’ve made a pared-back video of our first drive in the 991 R. No talking, no commentary. Just pure, unadulterated on-board footage as Lee takes to the road in this glorious 911. Enjoy.

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video: Porsche 991 R driven – the verdict

It’s the most anticipated 911 in years: at last the new 991 R heralds the return of a manual gearbox to a true performance Porsche. Touted by Porsche themselves as ‘a driver’s car for the road’, the R brings back those vivacious sensations of pure driver involvement that the PDK-clad 991 GT3 and GT3 RSs lacked.

The R hasn’t merely adopted a standard Porsche manual gearbox, though. It’s a reworked transmission featuring only six gears, one less than those found on other 991 contemporaries. Gears 2, 3 and 4 are incrementally longer as a result by way of a small (very, very small) compromise for getting rid of that overly long 7th ratio.

Melding a 500hp Rennsport flat six engine to a GT3 body (complete with narrower track over the RS), and with no fixed rear wing, the R slips through the air with gusto. The caveat here is a slightly more nervous rear end at high speeds than say a GT3 or GT3 RS, but then this is a driver’s car, remember, so for us that adds to the R’s appeal.

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The R has plenty of low-down torque available and pulls relentlessly all the way to an 8,500rpm redline, by which time a celestial flat six howl engulfs the cabin thanks to plexiglass rear windows and a comprehensive removal of sound deadening. The R’s pared back nature reveals a slightly more mechanical engine note over the RS too, despite the two cars sharing the same 500hp 9A1 powerplant. It is the pace of the R’s directional changes that enamours us most though, this lightweight firecracker hunting each apex down with unrivalled conviction.

That’s enough of our written notes, though. Watch the video below to see the 991 R in action as we reveal our verdict on this limited numbers, lightweight special.

Click here to view the embedded video.

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