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Fast Porsche Speedster

“The engine was the spare, well, it was what became the spare engine; it had been the primary engine in HR2, the 962 which I raced. It was the Daytona engine,” says Bruce Canepa.

It isn’t every shop that has such an engine going spare, and when Las Vegas casino owner Gary Primm contacted Canepa about the disappointing 1989 911 Speedster he’d just had delivered, the stars aligned.

Primm had driven his Speedster about 100 miles and found it lacking, calling Canepa to ask: “What can we do with this thing? It’s boring, and slow,” Primm and Canepa having collaborated previously on an AMG build.

It didn’t take Canepa long to figure out what to do with the Speedster. He admits: “They were pretty underwhelming. They had no power, they had a Turbo chassis, which was almost too much car for the motor, and they were flexy.”

He thought for a while before fixing on the idea of a 934 for the road. “Really, the nicest thing about Primm and a lot of my customers is he just let me build what I want,” says Canepa. “He didn’t really know what a 934 was. I said ‘we’re going to put on 934 flares; they look cool. We’re going to make it look like a Porsche race car, but with no roof on it.’”

The result is sitting in Canepa’s showroom in Scotts Valley, California. I’ve been poring over it for over an hour. Even here among Porsche rarities of
the like you’ll seldom see outside Porsche’s own Stuttgart Museum, the Speedster is a knockout.

G1 Guards red, because that’s how it was delivered to Canepa (all of Primm’s cars are red), the build is so beautifully executed it could easily be a factory car, albeit a very special one.

The deep front splitter has its outer cutouts filled by running lights behind Perspex, and the remaining three large intakes are pure 934 race car. In the unlikely event that the front bumper left you guessing, this is a Speedster unlike any other. Those 934-proportioned flared arches front and rear, covering 17-inch, three-piece BBS alloy racing wheels, leave little doubt.

Those punctured rear wings feed intake air into the engine, this Speedster taking the idea of a Turbo-bodied Speedster to its ultimate incarnation. Only unlike the standard cars, the visuals are more than matched by the mill…

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A Windshield Installation That Costs As Much as a Boxster S: Making Your Own 993 Speedster

The trouble with limited-run Porsche models is there simply aren’t enough to go around, and the 993 Speedster is among the most extreme cases. When Porsche launched a 911-based Speedster in 1989, they initially built 800. When they re-launched the Speedster with the 964 generation in 1994 they made just 936. When the 993 came around, things were even more limited. Porsche built just two- one for Butzi Porsche, and one a few years later for Jerry Seinfeld. If you want a 993 Speedster and don’t have a deep, personal connection to either of those two, you need to make your own.

Headlines get views, but a $50k windscreen undersells the challenges of getting the screen on the car. Making a Speedster from a 993 is far more than buying a hilariously expensive piece of glass and bolting it in. According to owner John Sarkisyan fitting the screen involved more than $10k in fabrication, to say nothing of additional thousands to bring the doors and side windows to Speedster standard. Just converting the glass on this car crossed the $70k mark- or about as much as a new Boxster S.

While widebody Porsches are going to be polarizing by there very nature- especially cars that are less track-oriented, we appreciate John’s commitment to his vision. Each of his creations brings a unique aesthetic, top-notch interior, and a singular vision to the car in question. It doesn’t matter if the car is a 356, a 912, or even an SLK32 AMG-turned Mercedes Gullwing, John gives each car a truly unique flair.

What do you think of this unique Speedster creation?

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997 GT3 v GT3 RS: Sharkwerks 4.1s

Engine displacement is everything in the US. The home of the Hemi is also the land where big V8s are shoehorned into just about everything, whether it’s for the school run or the race track. Bigger is supposedly better when it comes to cars, this a heavily enriched ideology ingrained into many aspects of general US society.

However, in the world of Porsche, superior engine size has never formed part of the agenda. While Lamborghini’s first car in 1963 was the 3.5-litre, V12 350GT, for example, Porsche’s original 911 had a measly 2.0-litre flat six. Lamborghini still uses the V12 in its Aventador today, while Audi’s R8 is powered by a 5.0-litre V10, and Ferrari’s V8 and V12 powerplants are considered legendary among the wider car enthusiast population. Despite this the plucky 911 sports car has continued to battle successfully against its bigger-engined rivals on circuit, sticking fiercely to its winning recipe of a robust flat six and an exquisite chassis.

It is this approach which Alex Ross, owner of Californian Porsche tuners SharkWerks, has always found favour with. British born, his extracurricular indulgence in Lotus is therefore forgiveable, but the overachieving 911 has always been the primary source of his motoring aspirations. This, fused with a hint of that ‘bigger is better’ American way, is what has given us the SharkWerks 4.1.

Long-time readers of Total 911 will already know of the prowess of the one-of-four Gulf-inspired Rennsport in our pictures, which we first featured
in early 2015. Acquired in 2011 before being ‘run in’ with a 2,600-mile jaunt across the USA, Alex 
and the SharkWerks team found tuning potential in its 3.8-litre Mezger engine, this becoming the trailblazer for its pioneering 4.1-litre programme. It all started before Porsche had even released its own 997 GT3 RS 4.0 – we told you the States does it bigger and better.

The fruits of more than five years of development includes a partnership with EVOMS to produce a race-spec, lightweight billet 80.44mm crank, CNC machined from billet 4340 high-alloy steel and tested to more than 9,500rpm, as well as a 104.5mm bore piston and cylinder set. The cylinders use steel liners and the pistons are Teflon-coated with anti-wear skirts and titanium wrist pins, saving 20 grams per piston and wrist pin combo against factory. In terms of top end, SharkWerks’ engine has ‘Hammerhead’ Shark-spec headwork along with race-style valve guides for longevity and cam adjuster strengthening, with everything balanced and blueprinted. A custom multi-indexed rotary-style oil pump is used, and the camshafts are SharkWerks/EVOMS spec.

The engine case has been race-prepped with, among other things, improved oiling techniques according to SharkWerks’ own wizardry. This is all partnered to EVOMSit ECU tuning; an RS 4.0-litre clutch pack, though Alex says the original factory set-up does work; a choice of SharkWerks lightweight street or track exhaust, and a host of chassis upgrades including Brembo GT brakes, Bilstein Clubsport double adjustable coilovers, RSS rear adjustable links, bump steer kit, thrust arm bushings and lower control arms, plus some aerodynamic adjustments.

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Magnus Walker’s latest Outlaw Porsche: reverential 964

It’s been some year for the Porsche brand. Not only have we seen a plethora of exhilarating new releases including the 991.2 GT3 RS and all-new 992, we’ve also been treated to glorious revivals of traditional models including the 911 Speedster and legendary Moby Dick. Hell, we even witnessed an air-cooled 993 Turbo roll right off the production line all over again!

It’s certainly no coincidence that these special cars are proving strong on the nostalgia front: 2018 has marked 70 years of Porsche, and Zuffenhausen has been keen to celebrate the milestone with its customers. We too wanted to pay homage to Porsche’s special 70th year of existence as, simply put, without the sustained presence of Zuffenhausen there’d be no car in your garage, and no magazine in front of you right now. We wouldn’t even have a job!

To do that though, we needed to look outside of Werk II, because although the 911s mentioned above all have one or two key design elements evoking the company’s rich history, we wanted to find a car – a single car – which best offers a design paying the ultimate homage to Porsche’s entire lifespan, from 1948 right through to today.

We soon found the perfect 911. Residing in Downtown Los Angeles, this special 964 became a passion project to deliver something truly unique, the heritage behind its modifications timely, the finished article truly timeless. The owner? One Magnus Walker.

You’ll already know the Urban Outlaw is no stranger to Total 911’s pages, having been a former ‘Living the Legend’ columnist and guest editor of our own 100th special issue. Magnus’ modified cars have garnered a keen worldwide following for their streetable, sports purpose style, and by his own admission, this 964 build is his most comprehensive yet.

“As you know, my goal is to have one of every Porsche model, including every generation of 911” Magnus says as he pulls open the sliding door to his sprawling garage in DTLA, the morning sunshine illuminating the dozen or so cars currently sitting in his collection. “I’d already built short wheelbase cars like my 67 SRT, long wheelbase cars like ‘277’ [originally a ’71T], the ’78 SC which was my first G-series build, so the 964 was a natural progression of what comes next. It wasn’t like I was looking for one, but it came at the right time and at the right price.”

Magnus acquired the 1990 964 Carrera 2 back in 2015 from a friend who’d scored a stash of cars from up north. Previously it had been used as a track day car by a hobbyist racer and gone off the circuit backwards, so it was at best a basket case when it finally rocked up with Magnus in DTLA.

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Our Favorite Porsches On Ebay This Week: Volume 126

We’ve been compiling some amazing Porsche models on eBay for a few years now, and we’ve seen some pretty astonishing examples pop up now and again. This week we’re focusing on one of the best handling cars of its time, the venerable Porsche 914. Hopefully you’ve enjoyed our curated look at the Porsche market. Keep in mind, some of these Porsches could be great collection investments, while others might prove to do more financial harm than good.

INTERESTED IN HAVING YOUR PORSCHE FEATURED HERE?

Every other week, we feature 5 of our favorite Porsches on eBay. That post is sent out to our mailing list of more than 17,000 Porsche owners and fans and is seen by 10s of thousands of other readers who visit our site directly. If you’re selling a Porsche on eBay and would like to see it featured here, just shoot us an email with the details and we’ll be back in touch. Otherwise, feel free to check out all the other eBay listings we have on our Porsches for sale pages.

1. 1972 Porsche 914 For Sale

From the outside, this 914 looks like a nicely prepared mostly-stock example. It’s got a set of later cookie cutter wheels, and the sail panels are missing their traditional vinyl covering. Inside, you’ll really only notice the extra gauges on the center console and a modern stereo head unit. When you open the trunks, however, you’ll notice some modifications beyond the norm. Up front is a big radiator, which requires a cut into the front trunk area. In the rear trunk, a large red distributor sticks up through the firewall. That distributor is attached to a huge Chevrolet V8. The ad claims the car is scary fast, and I believe it. 914s are featherweight flyers with sub-100 horsepower, so if you more than double the output, you’ll easily scare yourself.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

2. 1974 Porsche 914 1.8 Nostalgia Special For Sale

Another 914 with cookie cutter style wheels, and I’m starting to think these wheels belong on that chassis. For one thing, it means the car has been converted to five-lug, which is a good sign. This example has had a recent engine rebuild with larger bore pistons and cylinders, and the finicky fuel injection system has been ditched for carburetors. Aside from the paint-matched bumper, I really like the yellow paint and black trim of this 914. It’s a good looking weekend cruiser.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

3. 1972 Porsche 914 2.2-liter Hot Rod For Sale

If there is a common thread here with the five cars here, it’s that 914 owners just can’t leave well enough alone. This little white gem looks like a ton of fun with a seriously hot Type 4 motor that has been punched up to 2.2 liters. The seller states the car is estimated to have around 200 horsepower, but without dyno sheets, I’d be quite skeptical of that number. In any case, it’s a good looking car with plenty of power for most needs.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

4. 1975 Porsche 914-6 3.2-liter Outlaw For Sale

I’ve never been a fan of the 75 and 76 rubber bumper 914s, but somehow this one really seems to work well. With a set of the Fifteen52 Outlaw 4-lug wheels, and a nice coat of red paint, it looks just right. Like it deserved to be an outlaw all along. This particular car has a huge 3.2-liter engine in the back, built to enough power to kick some serious butt. Of the five cars featured here, this is the one I’d most like to drive home. It appears well built and fast enough to scare the pants off of even the most seasoned drivers.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

5. 1974 Porsche 914 Slant Nose Project For Sale

My head says no, but my heart says yes. There is something nostalgic to me about a poorly-finished slant-nose conversion, as these were everywhere in the 80s and 90s. This one has a V8 swap, to boot. It’s probably the least likely to make you any money, but if you finish it up right, you’ll grab eyeballs everywhere you go, and have a ton of fun in the process. You could probably bring something like this to a Radwood and take home a trophy (not that I have any connections or anything…).

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