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Nine gorgeous Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS details

While many Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RSs now languish in air-conditioned garages, the example featured in the latest issue has lived an active life, participating in numerous races and rallies over the years.

Top Total 911 snapper, Ali Cusick captured some stunning shots of this regularly exercised Rennsport and, while we didn’t really need any excuse, we thought that was reason enough to share this gorgeous gallery of details:

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To read our full test drive of this regularly exercised Rennsport, pick up Total 911 issue 147 in store today. Alternatively, order your copy online for home delivery, or download it straight to your digital device now.

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Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS: Rennsport for the Road

The history of the iconic Porsche 911 Carrera RS of 1973 is as lengthy as it is fascinating. Introduced to the public at the Paris Motor Show in October 1972, it was a typical example of early 1970s motor trends, ushering in a brave new outlook on life, characterised by loud and colourful products.

The RS was a motoring pioneer from launch, its illustrious reputation carried forward with distinction right to the present day, where it is regarded as one of Porsche’s most iconic 911s.

It is remarkable, then, to think that initially Porsche was worried about selling even the first batch of 500 cars: in their calculation of expected market demand, the rather conservative marketing department estimated that they should make only the required 500 homologation units of the new Carrera RS.

Fuchs and ducktail 2.7 RS

Concerned that they would otherwise sit with large quantities of unsold vehicles, the RS was priced at just DM 34,000 (about £5,230) compared to the DM 31,180 (about £4,800) for the 2.4-litre 911 S.

Although the Carrera RS was aimed at the sporting fraternity, the marketing department hoped that many of them would find homes as road-going cars, thus boosting sales.

When most of the first batch of 500 cars sold out soon after the Paris launch, a second batch of 500 was authorised by Ferry Porsche. When they too cleared the order books, a third batch was commissioned, resulting in 1,590 units being produced in just ten months.

Rally 2.7 RS interior

With the benefit of hindsight, we might wonder why Porsche didn’t commit to a much bigger production run but, at the time, this model represented a big step for the company.

The Carrera RS was the first 911 to wear the ‘Carrera’ badge, a name which drew on the brand’s early days competing in the Carrera Panamericana race in the 1950s. This model was also the first road-going car to feature the ‘RS’ moniker (this stood for Rennsport or Racing Sport), a powerful indicator of the car’s sporting potential and ability to go racing.

Although the Carrera 2.7 RS was only around 12mph faster than the 2.4-litre 911S, the bigger-engined car was 42mm wider in an effort to cope with much higher cornering speeds.

To read our full drive of this raced and rallied 2.7 RS, pick up Total 911 issue 147 in store today. Alternatively, order your copy online for home delivery or download it straight to your digital device now.

Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS rear

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Sales Spotlight: Porsche 993 Turbo

If you’ve got your copy of Total 911 issue 147, you’ll notice that we’ve dedicated a number of pages to one of the ultimate air-cooled Porsche 911s: the 993 Turbo.

Not only have we driven what is believed to be the last factory prototype in existence, we’ve also taken a thorough look at the 993 Turbo market in the latest issue thanks to our new ‘Porsche Index’ feature.

Should the first in our new series of in-depth market analyses have whetted your appetite for the last air-cooled Turbo, our weekly Sales Spotlight may have just found the car for you at independent specialist, Northway Porsche.

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With 80,000 miles on the clock, this 1997 model year example – finished in desirable Arctic Silver with a black leather interior – is perhaps a touch more leggy than some other cars currently on the market. However, this is reflected in the more than favourable price.

While some 993 Turbos are trading hands north of £150,000, Northway Porsche’s car is up for sale at £104,995, a figure guaranteed to keep the smile on your bank manager’s face. It’s a lot of Neunelfer for the money.

This particular 993 Turbo isn’t short of spec either, coming with an electric sunroof, Turbo S front brake ducts and tailpipes, the carbon interior package and optional white dial faces.

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There are a couple of aftermarket touches too, including a Cargraphic strut brace and larger K24 turbochargers (as fitted to the 993 GT2), making the already potent 993 Turbo package even more formidable.

Known to Northway Porsche for the last ten years (the car was sold to its last owner and maintained by the independent specialist), this 993 Turbo comes with a full service history and appears in pretty fine fettle.

For more information on this Porsche 993 Turbo, or any of the other Porsche 911s currently in their stock, check out Northway Porsche’s website now.

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The Porsche Index: 993 Turbo

Development of the Neunelfer has always been viewed as evolutionary, but since the 1984 launch of the 3.2 Carrera, Porsche was determined not to let the grass grow under the 911’s wheels.

That model was replaced by the substantially redesigned 964, a car that introduced modernities such as power steering, anti-lock brakes and four-wheel drive. By 1993 it was all change again, Tony Hatter’s interpretation bringing a smoother look and the promise of a body that was 80 per cent new.

More rigid and boasting new VarioRam-equipped engines and a sophisticated multi-link rear axle, the 993 proved hugely popular and was a fitting curtain call for the air-cooled era. But for the best part of a year, the range had lacked a crucial element, one that had featured on 911s for two decades.

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That situation was remedied for the 1996 model year with the arrival of the Turbo. As befitting a range-topping 911, buyers who stumped up the £91,000 asking price were treated to a unique styling and aerodynamic package, which included voluptuously flared rear arches and a fixed rear wing to replace the pop-up item found on other models.

But it was beneath that rear wing where the real intent lay, Porsche equipping the new car with an engine that, GT2 aside, was the most powerful yet fitted to a road-going 911, the 408bhp output and 4.3-second 0-62mph time eclipsing the figures of the Ferrari F355 that had been launched two years earlier.

Those numbers came courtesy of a 3.6-litre M64/60 motor that had been thoroughly revised. The new forged alloy cylinder heads contained a single spark plug per cylinder; there were stronger internals, and a pair of smaller KKK K16 blowers that negated the laggy throttle response, which had characterised previous turbocharged 911s.

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And the technological advances didn’t stop there, the 993 benefitting from a strengthened six-speed manual transmission – the 540Nm of torque precluded use of the Tiptronic automatic – that drove through a new, power-assisted clutch.

A 911 Turbo first was a viscous coupled four-wheel-drive system distributing the power, while stopping duties were taken care of by 322mm discs, Big Red calipers and Bosch ABS to convince buyers they really were buying the ultimate incarnation of the 993.

Until 1998, that is, with the unveiling of the Turbo S from Porsche Exclusive. Boasting the aggressive Aerokit II body addenda, power and torque were hiked to 450bhp and 585Nm respectively, numbers that ensured this model a place among the quickest of 911s.

To read our Porsche 993 Index in full, including expert market analysis and tips of prospective owners, pick up Total 911 in store today. Alternatively, order your copy online for home delivery, or download it to your digital device now.

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Total 911 issue 147 on sale now

The Porsche 993 Turbo’s ascension to greatness has been met with nearly universal approval from the Neunelfer community. Over the last few years, it has been clear that the last air-cooled Porsche 911 was the latest legend in the making.

Therefore, in Total 911 issue 147 – on general sale from today – we’ve dedicated not one but two whole features to the turbocharged icon. The first is our new ‘Porsche Index’ article, this issue focussing solely on the Porsche 993 Turbo.

We chart the model’s storied history, tell you what it’s like to drive and own, and get expert opinion from renowned marque specialists to see where they think the 993 Turbo’s future on the Porsche 911 market lies.

Porsche 997 GT3 RS 4.0

On top of this, Lee flew to Germany to get behind the wheel and tell the story of what is believed to be the last remaining ‘Werks Prototyp’ 993 Turbo, built by Porsche in 1993, a full two years before the car was launched to the public.

Away from the Porsche 993 Turbo, Total 911 issue 147 also features an alpine road trip with a Porsche 997 GT3 RS 4.0, proving that to truly enjoy Weissach’s seminal creation you need to get out and drive it.

There’s also an interview with new Porsche boss, Dr Oliver Blume and we reunite two of the original Porsche 911 Carrera RSR IROCs for an unforgettable test drive.

To read all of this and much, much more, pick up Total 911 issue 147 in store today. Alternatively, order your copy online for home delivery, or download it straight to your digital device now.

Porsche 911 Carrera RSR IROC

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