Vous êtes ici : PassionPorsche > Excellence

Excellence

Page 1 sur 13112345102030Dernière page »

Is Porsche about to release a GT3 Cabriolet?

Total 911’s spies have captured what looks like a Cabriolet version of its 991.2 GT3 on test in southern Spain, leading to speculation the company could be making a proper soft-top version of its widely heralded GT3. Porsche has this week been testing final pre-production prototypes of its forthcoming 991 Speedster just outside Granada, Spain, ahead of the car’s expected world debut at the Goodwood Festival of Speed, as well as the forthcoming 992 Carrera.

However, a particular mule caught our eye: a genuine Cabriolet-topped car (with windows behind the front seats, as opposed to the Speedster which only has windows for each door, see picture below) in a GT3-spec body. As you can see from the picture, the door card of the mule also reflects that of a production Carrera Cabriolet model, while a more pronounced Gurney flap appears on the active rear wing at the back. After the success of the road-biased GT3 Touring, could Porsche be about to pull the ultimate surprise with a GT3 Cabriolet?

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Porsche 991.2 GT3 RS v rivals

It won’t be under seven minutes,” said GT director Andreas Preuninger when I asked him about a Nürburgring laptime at the 991.2 GT3 RS reveal in Finland earlier this year. He was wrong: it is, and comfortably so, the Lizard green RS lapping the ‘Green Hell’ in 6 minutes 56.4 seconds in the hands of Porsche works racing driver Kévin Estre. That’s 24 seconds faster than the previous GT3 RS, which is little short of incredible.

It underlines the changes to the second-generation car, revisions which, on paper at least, look relatively insignificant. The engine is now that of the current GT3, albeit featuring a differing intake and exhaust. Its power creeps up – not leaps up – to 520hp, it revving to the same, glorious 9,000rpm. The increase is just 20hp over the GT3 and the Gen1 GT3 RS, Preuninger suggesting in Finland that the extra power would only account for a second or so worth of improvement.

Aerodynamic revisions, the immediacy and intricate control of the engine, the electronic differential, rear-wheel steering and PDK transmission and, crucially, the suspension would play their part, too. The new car borrows heavily from its GT2 RS sibling, that means 991 Cup in Nürburgring specification-derived, solid-mounted suspension, with spring rates double that of the outgoing RS, but softer dampers and anti-roll bars. It’s here that Preuninger suggests the biggest gains have been made, and on the road there’s no denying they’re revelatory.

If the 991.1 GT3 RS felt the most distinct departure from its mere GT3 relation previously, then the 991.2 shifts the RS genre into a different area again. The changes on the road are scarcely believable. Had you told me a 991.1 GT3 RS could be so comprehensively out-pointed I simply would not have believed you. The most familiar element is its engine, Porsche’s naturally aspirated 4.0-litre unit a masterpiece, previous experience of it in the standard GT3 underlining that. In the RS it’s sharper, even more immediate and sounds absolutely incredible. The GT department has worked extensively on the systems controlling it, indeed, the entire GT3 RS project defined by adding precision and accuracy to every single element of the car’s controls.

You notice that as soon as you brush the accelerator, the enthusiasm to spin up to its redline even more apparent than with the GT3. The differing intakes, the titanium exhaust and the loss of some carpet and sound deadening give it a clearer, more evocative voice, too, the mechanical sound not raw, but cultured with edge. Peak power’s at 8,250rpm, but just try and avoid chasing that redline at 9,000rpm. There is no let-up as you do, the reward not just the evocative notes the flat six creates, but the continued rush of acceleration across its entire rev-range.

We’ve not got the Nürburgring at our disposal today to explore that, instead we’ll make do with the de-restricted country roads around the Isle of Man. The RS can stretch its legs here, though it might not be able to do so were it not for the sophistication of the suspension. It’s here, specifically, that the GT3 RS takes an evolutionary leap over its predecessor. The GT2 RS-derived set-up allows incredible control and composure, despite tarmac that’s about as far removed from a racing track as it could possibly be. Imperfections on the surface are the norm, smooth tarmac here evidently anomalous, which makes it even more incredible to think that the bike racers who call these roads home during the TT races carry so much speed down these same roads.

For the full group test against the 996 and 997.2 GT3 RS, pick up your copy of Total 911 issue 166 from the shops now or order it direct to your door here. You can also download to any Apple or Android device. 

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

How to buy a project Porsche 911

How brave do you feel? Buying a project 911 isn’t for the faint-hearted; we’ve all heard tales of running repairs that snowballed into fully-fledged rebuilds. But for those with sufficient time, patience and money, restoring a car can be an edifying and enjoyable experience.
Here we round up what you need to know and look out for, with help from Autofarm founder Josh Sadler and his 911 2.7 Sportomatic.

Money is, of course, the elephant in the room. Parts availability for classic (1964-1989) 911s is at its best since the late 1990s – one positive side effect of rising values – but many components are expensive, and some still need to be custom made. Also, since most of us don’t possess the skills to restore a car ourselves, the task usually involves paying a specialist. With labour rates typically around £60 to £100 per hour, costs soon escalate.

It’s therefore best to approach most projects as a labour of love: a chance to save an ailing 911 from the scrapyard, rather than a business opportunity. Unless the car you plan to restore is a special model, such as an RS, you may find it hard to make a profit – even in the current, still-buoyant Porsche market. Work out how much you’re willing to invest before you start, not forgetting the cost of the car itself.

Josh’s 1976 2.7 Sportomatic is a perfect example of a project-in-waiting. On the plus side, it’s a very original, three-owner UK car with a verifiable MOT history and no obvious structural rust. Less positively, it’s covered 183,000 miles and hasn’t run since 1999 due to an undiagnosed engine problem. Josh wants £30,000 for the 911 and estimates it would cost a further £30,000 to fully restore. 

 

ENGINE

The engine is nominally the most complicated part of a classic 911, yet frequently the easiest to fix. “They’re a great big Meccano kit,” says Josh. “There are very few electronics to worry about compared to a modern car, and engines are potentially good for 200,000 miles if looked after properly. That said, I’d usually factor the cost of a rebuild into any project.”

The air-cooled flat six doesn’t suffer a pivotal, defining fault like the IMS issue that plagues early 996s. However, it evolved hugely over the years, so later cars are markedly more reliable. Josh singles out the final evolution of the original 911, the 1984 to 1989 model year Carrera 3.2, as having “a very solid and sorted engine”. 

One persistent problem that was fixed for the 3.2 concerns the timing chain. As 911 engines got bigger, torquier and lower-revving, more strain was put on the chain tensioners, partly with emissions in mind. These were pressurised in the 3.2, and many older cars have these upgraded tensioners retro-fitted – including Josh’s 1976. “Ironically, if you rev an early 911 hard, you get dynamic tension in the chain,” explains Josh. “So if you want your Porsche to be reliable… drive it like hell.” Advice we’ll happily adhere to.

Some oil seepage from the engine is almost inevitable, but oily cylinders are bad news. Look carefully at the crankcase: the O-ring seal around the crankshaft nose bearing expires, meaning the entire case needs to be removed and opened up. Cylinder head studs are problematic on earlier 911s with magnesium crankcases and also the 1978 to 1983 SC, as they can pull out or rust. Porsche partially solved this issue with coated studs for the Carrera 3.2, but the best replacements are 993 studs or ARPs.

For the full guide on how to buy a project 911, with specialist advice for engine, chassis, interior and body, plus our ten golden rules to consider before purchasing the project, get your copy of Total 911 issue 165 in shops now or available for direct delivery here

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Porsche 996 GT2: analogue anomaly

It is snowing. That’s suboptimal for any photoshoot, and more so when the subject will be a 996 GT2. Apparently the UK is being beaten by the ‘Beast of the East’, a Siberian weather front. So it’s snowing on the M25, London’s hateful orbital motorway. I’m not even at Paragon and I’m thinking of calling it all off: the motorway gantry signs are warning of severe weather and not to travel unless it’s essential.

I’m not sure ‘wanting to drive a 996 GT2’ counts as fulfilling that criteria, but I figure it’s worth pushing on as I’ve yet to receive a call from photographer Rich Pearce saying otherwise. Oddly, within 20 miles of Paragon’s Sussex location I enter something of a weather oasis, with bright sunshine and no clouds. Perhaps the Beast from the East is fearful of what’s in Paragon’s showroom; after all, the GT2 has something of a reputation. Rightfully, or wrongly, I’m still hoping to find out, and arriving at Paragon I’m immediately struck at how subtle it is.

My last GT2 experience was with the new one, the 991 GT2 RS, on UK roads for these very pages, and the figures the current car produces makes those of its ancestor look relatively mild. For the record, the 3.6-litre turbocharged flat six engine delivers 462bhp and 620Nm of torque. That’s enough for a 4.1 second 0-62mph time, a 195mph top speed and the sort of top-dog status in the early millennium that helped cement the GT2’s legend. Consider that a current 991.2 Carrera GTS develops within 10bhp of that maximum output and weighs only a few kilograms more and you could be hoodwinked into thinking that the 996 GT2 isn’t quite the menace the contemporary tests made it out to be.

That impression is further enhanced by the GT2’s comparatively meek looks, particularly compared to the somewhat overt current model. Based on a 996 Turbo it’s familiar, though GT2 spotters will appreciate the differing front bumper with its top vent, sizeable air intakes either side and more pronounced lower lip with its black leading edge. There are differing lower sills punctuated by alloy wheels which would usually wear GT2 wheel caps – this car instead favouring some stealthier Porsche crests – while there are punctured wings like its 996 Turbo relative. The fixed rear wing is the most obvious change over its Turbo brethren, coming in carbon if Clubsport was specified, saving as much as 2.8kg over the standard item.

The uprights that hold it aloft at the rear are structured as intakes, helping feed cooling, life-giving air to the 3.6-litre turbocharged flat six that resides under the engine cover. If you prised the badge off its rear the GT2 could pass as an aero-enhanced 911 to the uninitiated. That’s arguably a good thing, allowing the 996 GT2 to pass without attracting too much attention. That’s particularly true with Paragon’s immaculate example, painted in Polar silver: the original owner obviously didn’t plan any track activity and negated ticking that Clubsport option. There’s no cage, and the seats are black leather-covered sports items rather than cloth buckets.

To read the full article, pick up your copy of Total 911 issue 165 in shops now or get it delivered directly to you here.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Porsche 991.2 GT3 RS: first drive verdict

Precision. That was the development goal with the new GT3 RS. You can’t have missed it, the Lizard Green launch colouring hardly retiring. Thing is, you could have written it off, Porsche’s GT department firing out new models at an unprecedented rate, the Gen I car still very fresh in the memory. The huge shadow cast by the GT2 RS is still around, too, so this GT3 RS has got some fighting to do.

Twenty-four seconds covers it, though. That’s how much quicker it goes around the Nurburgring over the old Gen I 991 GT3 RS. Works Porsche Racing Driver Kévin Estre took this new car around that stretch of challenging tarmac in a scarcely believable 6 minutes 56.4 seconds. That. Is. Bonkers.

Looking at the specification it’s difficult to see where the new car gains such an advantage, we’re used to new generations eking out 5-10 seconds, but 24 is night and day. Either Andreas Preuninger has an epic poker face, or he was surprised, too. On two separate occasions up to the launch he told us he was looking at around 7 minutes 5 seconds, with only 1 second or so improvement down to the 20hp the engine gains. There’s 520hp for the record, it basically the same unit as the GT3, only inhaling and exhaling differently via RS specific intake and exhaust systems.

Twenty hp is nothing, but the engine feels different. Faster, more immediate, more, damn it, precise. That’s true of every element of the GT3 RS’s make-up, the PDK shifting even more quickly, the electronic differential, the steering – both front and rear-axle systems, all having been finessed to create a greater unity. The suspension is key, it’s basically that of the GT2 RS, which means hugely increased spring rates, solid mountings, yet softer dampers and sway bars.

It’s the chassis that’s so revelatory, a racecar set-up that’s devastatingly effective on the road, bringing it riding with supple composure that’s remarkable, and control that’s unerring. It’s unfiltered and pure, without the interfering compromises in its predecessors that would ultimately demand that you wind back the speed. The steering is crisp, quick and perfectly weighted, the front axle so sharp, the rear faithful, too.

That the chassis is mated to such an intoxicating, screamer of an engine and rapid-fire transmission only enhances the whole, allowing its performance to be fully exploited. This is RS nirvana, and a remarkable, genuinely surprising step-change over its predecessor. Nobody ever called that a dull, uninvolving, slow car, and it isn’t, it’s just that the new one is better in every single way, demonstrably so. The precision development goal is key, moving the RS to a new level, 24 seconds to be precise. Like the specification though, it’s not about the numbers, it’s about how it feels, and this new RS feels little short of sensational.

For the full report and your most comprehensive first drive verdict anywhere in the world, pick up your copy of Total 911 issue 166, in shops May 16th.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Page 1 sur 13112345102030Dernière page »

Suivez-nous…

Catégories

Archives

Amazon Music