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Nine gorgeous Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS details

While many Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RSs now languish in air-conditioned garages, the example featured in the latest issue has lived an active life, participating in numerous races and rallies over the years.

Top Total 911 snapper, Ali Cusick captured some stunning shots of this regularly exercised Rennsport and, while we didn’t really need any excuse, we thought that was reason enough to share this gorgeous gallery of details:

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To read our full test drive of this regularly exercised Rennsport, pick up Total 911 issue 147 in store today. Alternatively, order your copy online for home delivery, or download it straight to your digital device now.

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Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS: Rennsport for the Road

The history of the iconic Porsche 911 Carrera RS of 1973 is as lengthy as it is fascinating. Introduced to the public at the Paris Motor Show in October 1972, it was a typical example of early 1970s motor trends, ushering in a brave new outlook on life, characterised by loud and colourful products.

The RS was a motoring pioneer from launch, its illustrious reputation carried forward with distinction right to the present day, where it is regarded as one of Porsche’s most iconic 911s.

It is remarkable, then, to think that initially Porsche was worried about selling even the first batch of 500 cars: in their calculation of expected market demand, the rather conservative marketing department estimated that they should make only the required 500 homologation units of the new Carrera RS.

Fuchs and ducktail 2.7 RS

Concerned that they would otherwise sit with large quantities of unsold vehicles, the RS was priced at just DM 34,000 (about £5,230) compared to the DM 31,180 (about £4,800) for the 2.4-litre 911 S.

Although the Carrera RS was aimed at the sporting fraternity, the marketing department hoped that many of them would find homes as road-going cars, thus boosting sales.

When most of the first batch of 500 cars sold out soon after the Paris launch, a second batch of 500 was authorised by Ferry Porsche. When they too cleared the order books, a third batch was commissioned, resulting in 1,590 units being produced in just ten months.

Rally 2.7 RS interior

With the benefit of hindsight, we might wonder why Porsche didn’t commit to a much bigger production run but, at the time, this model represented a big step for the company.

The Carrera RS was the first 911 to wear the ‘Carrera’ badge, a name which drew on the brand’s early days competing in the Carrera Panamericana race in the 1950s. This model was also the first road-going car to feature the ‘RS’ moniker (this stood for Rennsport or Racing Sport), a powerful indicator of the car’s sporting potential and ability to go racing.

Although the Carrera 2.7 RS was only around 12mph faster than the 2.4-litre 911S, the bigger-engined car was 42mm wider in an effort to cope with much higher cornering speeds.

To read our full drive of this raced and rallied 2.7 RS, pick up Total 911 issue 147 in store today. Alternatively, order your copy online for home delivery or download it straight to your digital device now.

Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS rear

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Total 911 issue 147 on sale now

The Porsche 993 Turbo’s ascension to greatness has been met with nearly universal approval from the Neunelfer community. Over the last few years, it has been clear that the last air-cooled Porsche 911 was the latest legend in the making.

Therefore, in Total 911 issue 147 – on general sale from today – we’ve dedicated not one but two whole features to the turbocharged icon. The first is our new ‘Porsche Index’ article, this issue focussing solely on the Porsche 993 Turbo.

We chart the model’s storied history, tell you what it’s like to drive and own, and get expert opinion from renowned marque specialists to see where they think the 993 Turbo’s future on the Porsche 911 market lies.

Porsche 997 GT3 RS 4.0

On top of this, Lee flew to Germany to get behind the wheel and tell the story of what is believed to be the last remaining ‘Werks Prototyp’ 993 Turbo, built by Porsche in 1993, a full two years before the car was launched to the public.

Away from the Porsche 993 Turbo, Total 911 issue 147 also features an alpine road trip with a Porsche 997 GT3 RS 4.0, proving that to truly enjoy Weissach’s seminal creation you need to get out and drive it.

There’s also an interview with new Porsche boss, Dr Oliver Blume and we reunite two of the original Porsche 911 Carrera RSR IROCs for an unforgettable test drive.

To read all of this and much, much more, pick up Total 911 issue 147 in store today. Alternatively, order your copy online for home delivery, or download it straight to your digital device now.

Porsche 911 Carrera RSR IROC

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2018 Porsche 911 could use new shared chassis

The next generation Porsche 911 – likely to be dubbed the ‘Type 992’ – could ride on a newly developed modular sports car platform, if sources close to Zuffenhausen are correct.

While major technological changes are not uncommon for new generations of Neunelfer, Porsche has only carried out a wholesale overhaul of the underpinning architecture on the 911 twice since the car’s debut in 1963: once with the 996 and most recently with the 991.

The new modular chassis would allow Porsche greater flexibility with regards to engine choices. However, before you start worrying about the possibility of the 718 Boxster’s flat four under the Porsche 992’s decklid, it is more likely the move is to accommodate Porsche’s hybrid technology into the next generation 911.

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According to the rumours, the same modular platform will also find its way into the next generation Cayman and Boxster and could be shared with VW Group stablemates, Lamborghini and Audi (the latter for the R8 supercar).

The move would be a radical step for the 911, Porsche having long kept its iconic sports car ring-fenced from its in-house rivals. However, with VW Group needing to save money after the diesel emissions crisis, a shared modular platform would help to reduce development and manufacturing costs across the board.

Expected to be launched in 2018 (or possibly at the 2017 Frankfurt Motor Show for the 2018 model year) it’s been 12 months since we last spotted Porsche testing a 992 prototype.

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Total 911’s spies, however, recently caught a new 992 test mule on camera as it was put through its paces at the Nürburgring Nordschleife. Unlike the car from a year ago, the 992 prototype now runs with the 991.2 front and rear bumpers, suggesting that the switch to turbocharged engines is very much here to stay.

Interestingly, the test mule appears to be running the wide front arches from the current 911 GT3 RS (albeit with the Rennsport’s exit vents removed). Coupled with the makeshift arch extensions at the rear, the latest prototype suggests the Porsche 992 will feature a wider track than the current Carrera.

Whether the wider track is used to put more rubber on the road or to package the hybrid option is yet to be seen however, if the 2018 launch date is correct, there is still a year of development left before launch. In that time, the current 991 is set to get some special edition ‘run out’ models.

For all the latest Porsche 911 news, make sure you bookmark Total911.com now.

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Porsche Museum unveils new ‘Roadbook’ exhibition

A visit to Porscheplatz wouldn’t be complete without a look around the astounding Porsche Museum. However, you don’t have to be in Zuffenhausen to see many of the museum’s cars.

Every year, the Porsche Museum deploys over 200 cars from its vast collection to act as brand ambassadors in more than 30 countries. Now, the curators are giving visitors a behind-the-scenes look at how Porsche’s “rolling museum” is organised in a new special exhibition.

Porsche Museum 2016

‘Roadbook’ gives Zuffenhausen enthusiasts a look at the Porsche Museum “on the road around the world” with a number of new displays. From the logistical challenges of shipping the cars to organising celebrity drivers, the exhibition highlights the true scope of Porsche’s global appeal.

The technical support required for the rolling museum is showcased with displays highlighting the preparation carried out by the Museum’s own workshop while visitors are also given a glimpse into the ever-changing nature of the Porsche Museum itself.

Deploying cars around the world 365 days a year means that many of the displays at Zuffenhausen change with incredible regularity. Therefore, the sheer depth of Porsche’s collection – home to some of the German manufacturer’s most historically important sports cars – is showcased too in the new ‘Roadbook’ exhibition.

Of the cars on display, the 1966 Porsche 911 that travelled around the world celebrating the Neunelfer’s 50th anniversary in 2013 takes pride of place, as do a 911 Carrera RSR and 911 SC that took part in the Targa Florio and Classic China Rally respectively.

Porsche Museum 2016

Competing around the world in classic car rallies and other events such as the Goodwood Festival of Speed, a gallery of photos in the new exhibition document the tireless work of Porsche’s mechanics as well as the numerous celebrity drivers (from Derek Bell to Patrick Dempsey) who have got behind the wheel.

‘Roadbook: The Porsche Museum on the road around the world” will take pride of place in the Zuffenhausen museum until 23 April 2017, with visitors able to check out the new exhibition during normal opening hours (Tuesday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm).

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