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Carrera S

Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet (type 992)

Après le lancement de la 8ème génération de la 911 Carrera (type 992), en Coupé, Porsche présente le version Cabriolet, une tradition qui remonte à septembre 1981, date à laquelle la marque de Stuttgart a dévoilé le prototype de la première 911 Cabriolet au Salon de Francfort (lire ici). Depuis 1982, chaque génération de 911 a connu une cette déclinaison. Basée […]

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New Porsche 992 Cabriolet revealed

Less than six weeks after the launch of the 992 generation 911, Porsche has unveiled the open-topped version of its eighth generation sports car icon. As with its Coupe brothers, the Cabriolet has been released in Carrera S and Carrera 4S guise with PDK-only for now, the Carrera and Carrera 4 version with manual gearbox arriving later this year.

The Porsche 992 Cabriolet uses a similar kinetic system to the 991 before it, again operable at speeds of up to 30mph, though opening and closing time of the roof is now slightly quicker at 12 seconds. The roof system, which successfully maintains the form of the Coupe variant when covering the interior, again features an integrated (and heated) glass rear screen, now relying on lightweight yet sturdy magnesium bows to stop the roof from ballooning at high speeds.

This is necessary because the Porsche 992 Cabriolet has a top speed of 190mph in Carrera S form (188mph for the 4S), making it a very, very fast open-topped Porsche. It is the all-wheel-drive 992 which has the upper hand in the sprint stakes though, managing a 0-62mph time of just 3.6-seconds with optional Sport Chrono Package (the 2S’s time is 3.7-seconds).

The 2019 992 Cabriolet’s engine is exactly the same as that found in the 992 Coupes, its 3.0-litre ‘9A2 evo’ flat six producing 450hp and 530Nm torque. Both Cabriolets also withhold the widebody treatment rolled out for every 992-generation 911, its full-width light bar and staggered 20-inch front and 21-inch rear wheels also finding their way onto the Cabriolet which, for the first time, features an optional Sports PASM chassis, lowering the car by 10mm.

Prices for the rear-driven Carrera S Cabriolet start from £102,000 in the UK, its all-wheel-drive Carrera 4S stablemate available from £108,000. We prefer Coupe 911s here at Total 911, though with seamless lines, stunning performance and breathtaking aesthetical appeal, the 992 Cabriolet looks set to be the most convincing of its kind to date.

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Los Angeles 2018 : Porsche 911 Carrera S et 4S

Le salon de Los Angeles ouvre aujourd’hui ses portes à la presse. Les huitièmes générations de Porsche 911 Carrera S et 4S y font leurs grands débuts. S’il y a bien une voiture qui ne fait qu’évoluer en douceur à chaque renouvellement, c’est elle. La Porsche 911 dernière du nom ( 992 ) fait cette […]

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La Porsche 992, 8ème génération de 911

Depuis 55 ans, Porsche n’a cessé de développer et d’améliorer sa sportive originelle, la bonifiant avec le temps, comme un grand cru. Le constructeur de Zuffenhausen ne lui a rien épargné, l’amenant sur tous les terrains, des pistes asphaltées de l’endurance à celles caillouteuses du rallye-raid, lui demandant toujours plus, la victoire et rien d’autre, […]

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24 Variations on a Theme: Picking the Right 911 Derivative

Ford currently produces eleven Mustang derivatives, and Chevrolet makes eight Corvette variants(both of these figures include the coupe and convertible variations of the same trim separately). That’s a lot of choices from a nation known for customizing and individualization. Where variations on a theme are concerned, the Americans cannot be considered in the same breath as Porsche. There are twenty four 911 derivatives currently on sale, and the range of choices is staggering. Two-wheel drive or four? Hardtop, full convertible, or Targa? Even power output nearly doubles from the least to most powerful model in the lineup. Thankfully, Porsche understands that the full 911 lineup can be confusing, and sums it up neatly in under five minutes.

For buyers, some choices are driven by budget. Not every prospective Porsche buyer can put $293k on the masthead for a GT2 RS, nor should they. As the video shows, not every Porsche model is made for the same purpose. A buyer looking for a usable, everyday sports car should probably stay away from the GT range’s glorious odes to speed at all costs. At the same time, buyers who spend every possible moment at the track will not be as well served by a Carrera S as one of the more focused 911 variants.

Picking a 911

Let’s run through the 991.2 decision making process. For the purpose of this exercise, let’s call our hypothetical buyer Andrew. For the sake of not making up a purely theoretical person with absurd needs that cause them to daily drive a GT3 RS in Saskatchewan, I’m going to base this person on my dad. He has has been considering buying a 911 or a Cayman for some time, and his current daily driver is a Golf GTI Autobahn.

Andrew lives in the Northeast, and has an uncanny ability to find studded snow tires in sizes heretofore unknown to mere mortals. He has also been known to have winter and summer brake setups to work around winter wheel clearance issues. To my knowledge he’s never owned a car or truck with four-wheel drive, despite living deep in the land of ice and snow. He’s not a big fan of convertibles.

He has also been racing motorcycles for more than thirty years, and when he goes to a track, he prefers two wheels to four. His preference is for simplicity and usability. He’s a long time hot-hatch fan because of the high smiles-per-dollar ratio, and (until recently) the segment’s lack of driver aids. Ultimate output is not important, but grip and driver-involvement are.

So, in this case we can pretty safely remove the all-wheel drive variants, bringing the total number of choices from 24 to 12. Given his preference for spending track time on two wheels, the GT models can be ruled out as well, removing another three choices. Of the remaining eleven 911s, five are convertibles and can be eliminated. This leaves the Carrera, Carrera S, Carrera T, and Carrera GTS. Based on his disdain for complexity, and attitude of driver involvement before other concerns, the Carrera T then becomes the most logical choice.

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