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Get Schooled About Porsche’s Special Carrera 2.7 RS

What’s the difference between the Sport and Touring models of the 1973 Carrera 2.7 RS? How did Porsche drop over 200 pounds from the RS to get the M471 model down to fighting fit? What’s the history of Porsche’s special Grand Prix White paint color? Where’s the collector market on these incredible examples of Porsche sporting history? What more could you possibly want to know about the 2.7 RS? You name it, Road Scholars is here to help you navigate the world of Porsche’s first RennSport model.

If there is anyone who might know the answers to all of these questions and more, it’s Cam Ingram from Road Scholars. He’s been surrounded by incredible Porsches like these for his entire life, and has probably driven just about every Porsche ever made. To call him an expert would be under selling it.

In the short video you’ll learn a bit about these crazy cool vintage lovelies. It’s also an opportunity to get up close and personal with a trio of cars that mere mortals don’t normally get to set foot anywhere near. Only 1308 examples of the Touring (M472) and 200 examples of the Sport (M471) were built in 1973, and while the value curve of these has flattened out lately, they’re still incredibly expensive to purchase, own, maintain, and insure. If you have the means, we highly recommend it.

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’73 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7… Du outlaw Matching Number !

Rassurez vous, je ne vais pas vous rejouer le refrain de la 911 Carrera RS 2.7, soit vous cliquer sur le lien, soit vous rodez un peu la fonction recherche. Par contre celle dont je vais vous parler, elle est unique… faite sur mesure. Mais pas de outlaw, ni de prépa en mode barbare. Non, […]

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Porsche 911 Carrera RS (Type 993) – Produit de 1995 à 1996 à 1 014 exemplaires

La Porsche Carrera RS Type 993 offrait de nouveau en 1995 et en 1996 une performance sportive de très haut niveau. En bref : moteur 3.0 l de 300 ch, 1 270 kg, disponible en version standard ou en Clubsport, édition limitée à 1 014 exemplaires, … Dès la deuxième année de production de la …

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Porsche’s 993 Carrera RS Is Like A GT3 Before The GT3 Existed

Porsche’s GT range, at least as we understand it today, began with the 993 GT2. That rear-wheel drive, 444 horsepower, aggressively flared monster was the first use of the GT moniker on a modern Porsche. However, the car that came to define the GT line, the GT3, has much more in common with this car; the Carrera RS. Though it does not share the GT name, this 993 shares many of the hallmarks of the GT3 road cars. Though power was up only slightly compared to contemporary Carreras, the RS primarily improved performance by shedding weight. Indeed, the Carrera RS is 600lbs lighter than a 993 Turbo. Just 1,104 were produced over the model’s two year run, and Doug DeMuro is here to show you its quirks and features.

A Porsche of this stature may call for more than even Doug’s typical exuberance, so please accept this very excited German man as a substitute. While Mr. DeMuro’s usual videos focus on the many pieces of equipment found in most modern cars, the Carrera RS is rather the opposite. The RS is defined mostly by what it lacks compared to a standard 993. Without rear seats, door pockets, or a sunroof, the car doesn’t have much in the way of gadgets to keep Doug entertained. As a result, this is one of his shortest features in quite some time.

Though it was not officially a GT car, this 296 horsepower, lightweight, naturally-aspirated 993 shares much of what makes the later water-cooled GT3 cars so appealing. Though down on power, even compared to the earliest 996 GT3, the 2,750lb Carrera RS remains a potent performer today. Just look at Doug’s face from behind the wheel.

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30 yearsof 964: C2 v RS and Turbo v Turbo-look

Modernity is what the 964 brought to the 911, it arriving on the cusp of a new decade and would, in the then-CEO Heinz Branitzki’s words, “be the 911 for the next 25 years.” It never was, nor, admittedly, was it intended to be, but in the six years it was produced the increase in technology, as well as the proliferation of models, set the template for how the 911 would evolve into the model line we recognise today.

Its massively revised structure and chassis was able to incorporate necessities like power steering, driver and passenger airbags, an automatic transmission and also four-wheel drive. It was tested more rigorously on automated test beds, was built using more modern, cost-effective production techniques and brought the 911’s look up to date, without taking away from its iconic lines.

Such was Porsche’s focus on four-wheel drive it was launched as a Carrera 4, the Carrera 2 following it into production in 1989. Over the six, short years that followed the 964 would proliferate into a model line-up including Targa, Cabriolet, Turbo and RS in the regular series models, with specials like the Turbo S, RS 3.8, 30 Jahre and Speedster models all adding to the mix. It came at the right time, too, replacing the outdated 3.2 Carrera and boosting sales for Porsche when it needed them, the Carrera 2 and 4 selling 63,570 examples, those specials and the Turbos and RSs adding around 10,000 sales on top of that.

It was a successful, important car for Porsche, but just how does it stack up today, and which one to go for? The 964 is the car that introduced the 911 conundrum, one which, in part at least, we’re going to try and settle here today. We’ve four 964s here: a Carrera 2, an RS, a Carrera 4 widebody with its Turbo-aping hips, and a later 3.6 example of the 964 Turbo. The Carrera 2, naturally, is the most available, with some 19,484 sales globally, the RS selling some 2,405, the widebody being very limited (numbers are hard to come by) and the Turbo 3.6 finding 1,427 buyers for the year it was produced.

For many the Carrera 2 is the obvious choice, but take all the numbers out of the equation and things get a little bit different. To digest it there’s a natural split, the narrow and widebody cars, which is why I’m jumping first into the slim-hipped Carreras, and specifically that big-selling Carrera 2.

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