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Richard Attwood drives a 964 3.8 R restomod

road car. A race car. An engineer’s car. The 911, more than any other car, is a product of continual automotive evolution. Porsche’s enhancements have kept it relevant for the road, competitive on the track and have cemented its reputation as the enthusiast’s car of choice. That evolution isn’t just limited to Porsche itself; an entire industry out there takes 911s backwards and forwards in time, improving, re-imagining, personalising. The 911 is an eminently adaptable basis upon which owners can build the car they want from it.

With this 964, that’s exactly what RPM Technik has done for its owner Ian Humphris. The idea was for a fast road car that could be track driven, adding contemporary performance while being respectful to the classic feel and engagement a 964 brings. Using a Carrera 2 as its basis, the build process has been meticulous, seeking improvements in every area, this now a 964 that can run with its more recent GT department relations, yet offers a driving bandwidth that enables it to be enjoyed on the road, too.

Of all the many branches of 911 evolution and sub-species, this visceral, exciting 964 arguably represents the most appealing opportunity for perfecting and personalising, taking a tired Carrera and reviving it as a car that can be enjoyed. Its performance absolutely eclipses a 964 RS that you’d be too scared to drive. What RPM and Humphris have created is the perfect riposte to a zeitgeist where vehicular value takes president over the value of driving itself.

PART ONE: ON TRACK

It’s a sunny day at Bedford Autodrome, our track time exclusively reserved for RPM Technik’s 964 3.8. Owner Humphris likes his cars too: there’s a 997 GT3 RS in his garage, alongside some other special machinery, but it’s the 964 he’s animated about.

It’s obviously not standard, but to the uninformed could just be a neat, small, red Porsche 911. Its lowered stance could be missed, its split-rim BBS alloys less so. Humphris admits that they’re his road wheels, having a set of Cup 17-inch wheels with some cut slicks for serious track work. There are subtle hints to its revisions visually then, the black-rimmed headlight surrounds an RSR nod, the small lip splitter a neat addition under the front bumper.

There’s no surprises seeing the brake intakes on the front bumper, though they’re framed by darker indicator lenses. These, like those headlight surrounds, contrast perfectly with the red bodywork. Around the back the build follows the same understated enhancement route, this 964 retaining a single exhaust pipe, though the engine cover suggests that single pipe is attached to something a little bit different from the norm. The sticker, not badge, says 3.8 R, a model that’s entirely of its owner’s making, and justifiably so. Specification or naming purists be damned, this is a car that defines purity, a car built for an individual, with their – and only their – ambition and goals for it driving the entire project.

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Bruce Canepa Offers Porsche 959 Upgrades

Since Porsche 959’s are now legal to be roaming freely on our open American highways, Bruce Canepa of Canepa Design in Scotts Valley, California offers a conversion available in 2 phases to really bring them up to their full potential. To most die hard automotive enthusiasts, Bruce needs no introduction, but in case you still aren’t sure of who he is, maybe the video of his shakedown of a Porsche 917 on a public highway embedded in our previous 917 restoration feature here will help the comprehension process: http://www.carbuildindex.com/19504/1972-porsche-91710-008-restoration/. To say that this guy knows his Porsches would be a gargantuan understatement. Continue on the following page for more details on the warmed-over 959… He starts with extremely well cared for examples from his search all around the world. Since the cars are all wheel drive, a lot of them have been driven throughout the year in all sorts of weather conditions, so it is important for him to find clean, low mileage examples with 6,000 miles or less. The conversion costs between $100,000 and $140,000 with Phase 1 producing 575 hp and Phase 2 is said to make north of 640 hp. He installs a new Motec-based engine management system, new […]

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Not a Restoration: 1978 Porsche 935 “Moby Dick” Build

This 1978 Porsche 935-007 was the restoration project of the marque experts at Freisinger Motorsports in Germany. Serial number 006 and 007 examples of “Moby Dick”, as they came to be known, were the latest developed iterations of the factory 935 series turbocharged race cars. Their elaborately shaped aerodynamic bodies were designed for high speed tracks, while still retaining the classic 911 silhouette. Many unique pieces on the factory racing specials, such as their “upside down” transmissions, larger one piece aluminum brake calipers and 3.2 liter, four valve, twin cam water cooled Type 935/71 engines had not yet been made available to private race teams. And who could blame them, because what hugely-funded factory racing effort wants a lowly privateer to beat them at their own game? In any case, continue on the following page for a brief history of #007’s journey from a 9 year hibernation stint in a Porsche storage unit in Germany to it’s new owner in Los Angeles in 1988, and then back to Germany again for the epic project seen here to begin. The predecessor to this feature car, Moby Dick number 006 seen above, won at the 1978 running of the Silverstone 6 hour race and qualified in […]

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Reader Submission: Blank Slate 911- A 911 built in a downtown LA loft complex parking lot

The brutish Porsche 911 pictured above is a strictly business build brought to us by 2 brothers via Reader Submission. We’ll let them tell you the full story about it themselves, which is accompanied by an overload of tasty photos. It was too difficult to choose which ones to post and which not to, so we included all of them. All we had to do is take one look at those Hoosiers mounted on deep dish rims and we knew we had a winner. Check it out for yourself on the following page… Blank Slate 911 A 911 built in a downtown LA loft complex parking lot The Geniuses: Nikita Bridan Iliya Bridan The Location: 1000 S. Hope ST Los Angeles, CA Beginning Living in a downtown loft, with no personal garage space would seem to make you think that maybe building your own 911 is not really possible. However one day we decided that it actually would be a fantastic idea. We would just work on the car late at night when no one was down in the underground parking structure. This seemed like a brilliant idea. Very soon it would lead to some very interesting and extremely long nights. The […]

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1956 Porsche Pre A Speedster (#81221) Restored and Reunited With Previous Owner

This 1956 Porsche Pre A Speedster (#81221) underwent a full restoration by it’s owner, Chad Comeau, who chronicled the whole ordeal in a detailed thread seen at Porsche356Registry.com, linked below. He had known about the car sitting in storage unused for years and had contacted the owner several times, but he was always told that it was not for sale. About 10 years later a fellow club member contacted Chad and told him that the Speedster might finally be on the market, so he jumped at the opportunity and finally bought it, beginning it’s transformation back to life after a long hibernation. This Porsche had been exercised regularly in it’s previous life at PCA club events, Watkins Glen track adventures, auto crosses, road rallies, driver’s education events and was also daily driven before it was finally put away. When Chad bought the car it still had masking tape on the doors that had held the race number signs. It’s good to see that it had been used the way a Speedster was intended: driven frequently and driven hard. The original, matching numbers 1600 Super engine that came with the car didn’t survive a Watkins Glen track event back in the […]

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