Vous êtes ici : PassionPorsche >

auctions

Inside The Front-Wheel Drive Porsche-Powered Camper You’ve Never Heard Of

Stateside the Tempo company is not well known. While the marque’s utility vehicles were well-known in Europe both just before and after the Second World War, most did not cross the Atlantic. Beginning with tricycle pickup trucks the brand steadily branched out into larger and larger commercial vehicles in the years following the war. With great interior volume comes great versatility, and for a company making buses and large vans a camper conversion was virtually inevitable.

All photos from Mecum Auctions https://www.mecum.com/lots/CA0819-381054/1955-porsche-tempo-mikafa-sport-camper/

The Tempo Matador was among the brand’s most successful models, and early examples featured a Volkswagen industrial engine powering the front wheels. Unlike the contemporary VW Type 2 this allowed for a low, flat load floor. Unlike the Type 2, this was nearly textbook-perfect for an RV.

This example, built by Mifaka, uses a contemporary Matador chassis. While Tempo themselves had moved on from VW engines to Austin (among others), Mifaka sought something rather more sporting. This example was originally powered by a 356-sourced 1500cc flat-four. While plenty zesty in a 356, this wouldn’t be our first choice for a recreational vehicle.

The camper has since been re-engined with what appears to be a later dual-carb VW powerplant mounted in a cabinet under the front seats. Still not powerful, but possibly slightly punchier than the original item.

To continue the Porsche theme, the camper uses large, round, 356-style Hella lamps and aluminum exterior trim. A Porsche badge adorns the front of the vehicle, and indeed the vehicle is titled as a 1955 Porsche. Imagine the confusion this would cause at your next PCA-meetup!

Inside the Mifaka-Tempo-Porsche is classic 1950s camper. Though short on amenities compared to today’s RVs, the cabin is exceptionally well-lit, and includes a convertible sleeping and dining area, a stove, sink, and a refrigerator. A functional restroom is also present, and a large pop-up roof panel affords ventilation for the occupants.

A true Porsche or not, we love it in concept. The camper appears tidy, compact, and so far from fashionable that it circles back around to terminally cool. We wish it could be ours, and it certainly could be- this one is crossing the block at Mecum’s Monterey sale in August.

Gallery

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Origin of the Species: Type 64 Goes to Auction in August

The Type 64 was many things, but it was not conventionally beautiful. Designed to make the most of a tuned, 32-horsepower variant of the Volkswagen Type I flat-four, the all-aluminum car was a masterpiece of 1930s aerodynamics. The riveted construction was strong and rigid for the day, and emulated the construction techniques used on then-current German aircraft like the Bf 109 and Fw 200.

This particular car, the third built, was actually completed in 1940 using the remains of the wrecked first car. Ferry Porsche and his family used the car routinely for several years, and the car received its first restoration in 1947 at the hands of a young Pinin Farina. Yes, this car was first restored a year before 356/001 saw the light of day. Perhaps most importantly, it is allegedly the first car to ever carry the Porsche insignia on the front.

During the premier of  the first 356, the Type 64 was demonstrated by Austrian driver Otto Mathé, who was smitten by the car and owned it through his death in 1995. From 1940 through 1995, the little Type 64 had just two owners, each a legend in their own right. From 1997 through the present day the car has belonged to Doctor Thomas Gruber of Vienna, who has shown the car at vintage events periodically throughout his ownership.

While owners love to toss around words like « numbers matching, » making such claims about the Type 64 is more challenging than average. The hopeful Type 64 owner will not be able to reference a Kardex, but will have to rely on experts. Per Andy Prill, a marque specialist who recently inspected the car, « I have found evidence that all of the key components were manufactured in 1939/40, » which by itself is special. How many sports cars were completed in that part of the world during the opening phases of the Second World War?

Though its origins were shrouded by war, and muddled slightly by being built for a race that never actually happened, the Type 64 remains one of (if not the) most significant Porsches of all time. When the Type 64 crosses the auction block in August with RM Sothebys, the result is virtually guaranteed to be tremendous. What the Type 64 lacks in pace it more than makes up for in pure provenance.

Gallery

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

$425 000 pour une Porsche 959 accidentée

Porsche_959_Mecum_Auctions

La semaine de Monterey voit son lot de super ou d’hypercar défiler. Elle voit aussi plusieurs ventes aux enchères avoir lieu. Cette Porsche 959 accidentée a été vendue pour la coquette somme de $425 000 lors de la vente Mecum. En dessous de l’estimation Le modèle présenté à l’encan a une histoire peu banale. Modèle […]

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Amelia Island 2016 readied for 911 Turbo world records

The Amelia Island auctions are very often home to new world sales records: in 2013 a Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS sold for $1,402,500 (then equivalent to £847,200) at Gooding and Co’s sales, a figure that has still not been topped despite the air-cooled neunelfer boom.

Last year, it was the turn of the 2.7 Rennsport’s little brother, the Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 MFI to capture the headlines, with RM Sotheby’s selling the impact bumper-ed 911 for $308,000.

This year though both RM and Gooding’s Amelia Island auctions look set to be dominated by classic Porsche 911 Turbos, while the latter has also secured a delectable selection from Jerry Seinfeld’s envious Porsche collection.

Photo Credit: Drew Shipley ©2016 Courtesy of RM Sothebys

Photo Credit: Drew Shipley ©2016 Courtesy of RM Sothebys

Leading the way in the 930 stakes is RM Sotheby’s 1979 911 Turbo (top image), lot 186 at its Ritz-Carlton sale on Saturday 12 March. The silver 930 – an early 3.3-litre car – has completed just 548 miles from new and is offered in an near-immaculate timewarp spec.

It’s $300,000-$375,000 (£211,000-£264,000) estimate is closely followed by another Porsche 930 under RM’s stewardship at Amelia Island: a 1976 3.0-litre example with a guide price of $275,000-$350,000 (£193,000-£246,000).

Among the five neunelfers consigned by RM (all of which are Turbos) potentially the most expensive is a Porsche 993 Turbo S, set to go under the hamme this weekend for $400,000-$475,000 (£281,000-£334,000).

Photo Credit: Brian Henniker ©2016 Courtesy of Gooding & Co.

Photo Credit: Brian Henniker ©2016 Courtesy of Gooding & Co.

The stars of Gooding and Co’s sale – to be held on Friday 11 March – have undoubtedly by the cars procured from Jerry Seinfeld’s incredible collection, led by a genuine Porsche 911 Carrera RSR used in the inaugural IROC series in 1973-74.

It’s $1.2-$1.5 million estimate swamps almost all the other Porsche 911 lots on offer during the Concours week celebrations, bar a genuine, ex-works Porsche 911 ST 2.3 raced and bought by Gerard Larrousse – expected to sell for $1.1-$1.4 million and a Porsche 959 Komfort with an estimate of $1.3-$1.6 million.

The latter could well set its own world record with Gooding the current record holders with a 959 Sport that sold at Monterey last year for $1.705 million. The most expensive Komfort spec car was also sold at Pebble Beach 2015, with Bonhams achieving $1.457 million.

To ensure you keep abreast of all the latest Porsche 911 auction news, make sure you bookmark Total911.com now.

Photo Credit: Brian Henniker ©2016 Courtesy of Gooding & Co.

Photo Credit: Brian Henniker ©2016 Courtesy of Gooding & Co.

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Not Exactly Cheap Thrills: Janis Joplin’s Porsche 356 Going on the Block

1965 Porsche 356 C 1600 cabriolet Janis Joplin

What do you do after the Summer of Love? If you’re Janis Joplin in 1968, you buy an Oyster White ’65 Porsche 356C convertible and have a pal paint it up in grand psychedelic style. With apologies to the 1970 917 Langheck that competed at Le Mans, this little bathtub earned the title of Original Porsche Hippie Car.

1965 Porsche 356 C 1600 cabriolet Janis Joplin

Joplin’s band, Big Brother and the Holding Company, had left its initial mark the previous year, at the Monterey Pop Festival—an event also notable for having borne witness to Jimi Hendrix’s legendary Stratocaster flambé. Flush with a fresh record contract with Columbia, Joplin picked up the three-year-old 356C from Estes-Zipper in Southern California. She then left the car with friend and roadie Dave Richards for a paint job more in line with her tastes while she went on tour. What resulted—a mural called “The History of the Universe”—made Joplin’s 356 an automotive artyfact of the first psychedelic era on a par with Ken Kesey’s Furthur and John Lennon’s madcap Roller.

1965 Porsche 356 C 1600 cabriolet Janis Joplin

And now, like many long-held air-cooled Porsches and important rock ’n’ roll totems of rebellion, it’s for sale. After a period in the wilderness—where it was left in the custody of manager Albert Grossman after Joplin’s death in 1970, then returned to her family in the mid-1970s and resprayed gray—the car was restored to its Owsley-spec glory in the late-’90s/early aughts. In the interim, it had been used by musicians at Grossman’s Bearsville Studios as a commuter car—leading to rumors that it had been purchased by either Robbie Robertson or the late Levon Helm of The Band, then driven by Joplin’s younger siblings, Laura and Michael. After restoration, it was loaned to the Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland for a lengthy stay, and now, finally, it’s up for auction at RM Sotheby’s “Driven by Distruption” auction, which is a terrible name for any auction of important stuff and Sotheby’s should be stiffly fined for using it.

The car is estimated to sell for somewhere in the neighborhood of $400K, which seems low to us, given its status as perhaps the best-known example of the 356, in an era when 356 prices have gone absolutely bananas.

1965 Porsche 356 C 1600 cabriolet Janis Joplin

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Suivez-nous…

Catégories

Archives

Nos partenaires