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This 1986 944 Turbo Just Sold For $74,000: Is It A Sign Of Things To Come?

Has the 944’s time finally come? The model’s popularity has led to a steady upward creep in prices in recent years, and this recent BAT result may just be the tip of the iceberg. Indeed, even Jerry Seinfeld is getting in on the action, having just acquired a black Turbo and this S2 Cabriolet. This 5k-mile 1986 Turbo just smashed Bring a Trailer’s auction record for the model, doubling the previous top result for a 944 Turbo, and besting the previous top 944 sale by more than $30k. At $74k, this Pearl White coupe has reached beyond the model’s typically-modest pricing, and well into territory normally occupied by low-mile Supra Turbos, Ferrari 328s, and well-optioned 993s.

Photo from Bring a Trailer

This result is the latest in a streak of increasingly impressive results for the model. Recent results from other auction houses, including an impressive $72,600 result at Gooding & Co’s Monterey sale, have approached the result achieved on BAT. According to the included original window sticker the car originally sold for $33,600, meaning that over three decades the car more than doubled its original sticker price, and roughly kept pace with inflation.

Photo from Bring a Trailer

Credit is due to the seller’s exceptionally thorough approach. While BAT sellers are generally very thorough, with galleries often creeping beyond 150 images, this seller went above and beyond with over 400 images. Everything from paint meter readings, to the stampings inside the included set of color-keyed Fuchs wheels were documented. It is pretty clear that this is an exceptional 944 Turbo.

Interestingly, this car came from the same town as the Utlimate Enthusiast Garage featured here in 2017, though it was not owned by the same person. It’s pretty clear, however, that this car lived an extremely pampered life.

While aficionados may argue about the merits of this first-year Turbo compared to the later cars, we challenge anyone to find another comparable Turbo of any year. The real question with this car is whether to keep the phonedials on the car, or mount up those deliciously-’80s Pearl White Fuchs.

Photos from Bring a Trailer LLC used with permission.

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991.2 GT3 v 991.1 GT3 RS: which is better for £150k?

The ever-changing nature of the Porsche marketplace often throws up some interesting conundrums for the 911 buyer. As values of separate models fluctuate, they often combine to bring about new scenarios for those in the market to consider: ‘What’s around for my £100,000?’ for example. Right now there are many different choices of 911s available at many different price points. As a case in point, for £40,000 you could choose anything
from a G-series classic, to a 996 Turbo, to a 997.2 Carrera S right now. The market’s constant evolution means different cars move in and out of the equation, whatever your budget. It’s what keeps things interesting, in many ways.

As another case in point, only five years ago we ran a head-to-head road test in this very magazine asking which was the better Turbo for your £60,000: 993 or 997.1? Today the 993 is worth at least double that, while a 997.1 can be had for £50,000.

Market circumstance has dictated the 991.2 GT3 and 991.1 GT3 RS have been trading hands for roughly the same money for a while now, so the question we’ve routinely found levied in our direction in the past year is thus: ‘Which is the better buy for my £150,000; a Gen2 991 GT3 or Gen1 991 GT3 RS?’

Really, there are multiple answers to the question, and it all comes down to what you’ll do with the car. We’ve therefore assessed both the 991.2 GT3 and 991.1 GT3 RS over three practical categories, investment potential, track day use, and on the road, which covers all possible ownership intentions.

For the full article on the 991.1 GT3 RS v 991.2 GT3, pick up your copy of Total 911 issue 174 in shops now, or get the issue delivered direct to your door via here. You can also download our hi-res digital edition, featuring bonus galleries, to any Apple or Android device. 

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THE AUTHORITATIVE PORSCHE SCOTTSDALE 2019 AUCTION PREVIEW

It’s time again for the Auction action to start back up after a short winter hiatus. The major auction houses will converge on Scottsdale, Arizona to attempt to sell some of the most sought after collectible Porsches in the world. This auction consistently sets the stage for the year’s auction action. Check out the Porsche lots listed below.

BONHAMS – 

Bonhams continues to be the leader in Porsche collectible sales. Transaxle cars and 914s are on their way up in the market, and Bonhams has a little bit of something for everyone there. In addition to the up and comers, Bonhams has a bunch of blue chip collectibles and some high dollar super classics. With a Fuhrmann four-cam engined Carrera Cabriolet and a 904/6, the vintage folks will sit up and pay attention to this auction.

Lot 30 – 1964 Porsche 904 Carrera GTS – Est. $1,400,000 – 1,600,000

The 904 Carrera GTS is arguably among the most beautiful sports racing prototypes of all time, and it must have looked like an absolute missile when it debuted in 1964. This car was originally equipped with a Type 587/3 four-cam four-cylinder engine, and finished in silver metallic. With chassis number 904/012, this was the second 904 delivered to a customer outside of the factory works effort. This example was purchased new by Steve Earle, a California racing driver who later founded the Monterey Historics.

Before he had an opportunity to race it, Earle found a deal on a Ferrari 250LM chassis and sold the 904 to one Mr. Steve Berg. The car raced in the 1964 and 1965 seasons all over the United States with Kurt Neumann at the wheel to a decent level of success. Berg offered the car for sale with an ad in Competition Press saying that the car was for sale because he’d ordered a 906 to replace it. The 904 was purchased from that ad by the one and only Robert Redford. Redford owned and drove this 904 for nearly a decade.

Since that time, the car has passed through a number of owners, and has had a flat six engine installed where the four-cam once was. The transaxle is original to the chassis, but the engine is said to be still in existence… somewhere. This is a superb candidate for restoration, or for vintage racing. It’s got decent American provenance, and a celebrity owner. If nothing else, this is an extremely interesting example of one of Porsche’s most interesting cars.

Lot 31 – 1989 Porsche 911 Turbo Slant Nose Cabriolet – Est. $175,000 – 250,000

Lot 8 – 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Speedster – Est. $200,000 – 250,000

Lot 10 – 1962 Porsche 356B 1600 Coupe – Est. $70,000 – 90,000

Lot 13 – 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.3L – Est. $150,000 – 200,000

Lot 27 – 1956 Porsche 356A Speedster – Est. $375,000 – 450,000

Lot 48 – 1973 Porsche 911S 2.4L Coupe – Est. $140,000 – 180,000

Lot 51 – 1994 Mercedes-Benz E500 – Est. $70,000 – 90,000

Lot 68 – 1967 Porsche 912 Coupe – Est. $70,000 – 90,000

Lot 71 – 1975 Porsche 914 1.8L – Est. $20,000 – 25,000

Lot 72 – 1958 Porsche 356A T2 1600 Speedster – Est. $250,000 – 300,000

Lot 78 – 1971 Porsche 911T 2.2L Targa – Est. $90,000 – 110,000

Lot 87 – 1993 Porsche 928 GTS Manual – Est. $100,000 – 125,000

Lot 88 – 1963 Porsche 356B Carrera 2 GS Cabriolet – Est. $1,100,000 – 1,300,000

Lot 102 – 1969 Porsche 912 Outlaw – Est. $65,000 – 85,000

Lot 104 – 1979 Porsche 928 – Est. $35,000 – 45,000

Lot 106 – 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Cabriolet – Est. $35,000 – 45,000

Lot 112 – 1989 Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet – Est. $140,000 – 180,000

Lot 114 – 1966 Porsche 912 Coupe – Est. $60,000 – 80,000

Lot 118 – 1994 Porsche 968 Coupe – Est. $55,000 – 75,000

GOODING & CO – 

Gooding & Co’s Scottsdale auction doesn’t really have a single Porsche that stands out as a single headliner. There are a few good ones, but nothing spectacular. The Magnus Walker car that sold a few years ago at Monterey for huge money was posted in the auction’s preliminary listing, but has since been pulled for unknown reasons. For me, this is an opportunity to see what the collector market does with the following two lots. The first, a 911R, has the opportunity to set the market for all 911R sales in 2019. Will it be a blowout, or will it sell for less than expected? The second, a mid-year 911S, has the opportunity to prove either the Porsche market is still gaining steam, or people are starting to come to their senses and not pay big money for an underwhelming driving experience. Here goes 2019!

Lot 109 – 2016 Porsche 911R – Est. $300,000 – 375,000

Lot 059 – 1976 Porsche 911S 2.7L Coupe – Est. $90,000 – 120,000

Lot 004 – 1973 Porsche 914 2.0L – Est. $45,000 – 65,000

Lot 010 – 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera – Est. $125,000 – 175,000

Lot 020 – 1959 Porsche 356A Coupe – Est. $160,000 – 180,000

Lot 026 – 1965 Porsche 911 2.0L Coupe – Est. $200,000 – 250,000

Lot 033 – 1965 Porsche 356 SC Cabriolet – Est. $225,000 – 275,000

Lot 041 – 1973 Porsche 911T 2.4L Targa – Est. $130,000 – 160,000

Lot 045 – 1961 Porsche 356B Super 90 Cabriolet – Est. $190,000 – 220,000

Lot 053 – 1968 Porsche 911 2.0L Coupe – Est. $125,000 – 175,000

Lot 054 – 2011 Porsche 911 GT2 RS – Est. $425,000 – 475,000

Lot 058 – 1956 Porsche 356A Speedster – Est. $450,000 – 550,000

Lot 103 – 1972 Porsche 911 « STR II » by Magnus Walker – Lot Withdrawn

Lot 107 – 1958 Porsche 356A Speedster – Est. $350,000 – 425,000

Lot 120 – 1965 Porsche 356 SC Coupe – Est. $150,000 – 180,000

Lot 124 – 1969 Porsche 911T 2.0L Coupe – Est. $125,000 – 150,000

Lot 126 – 1987 Porsche 911 Turbo Slant Nose Coupe – Est. $225,000 – 275,000

Lot 130 – 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 – Est. $70,000 – 90,000

Lot 132 – 1959 Porsche 356A Convertible D – Est. $220,000 – 260,000

Lot 134 – 1972 Porsche 911E 2.9L Coupe – Est. $125,000 – 175,000

Lot 137 – 2008 Porsche 911 GT2 – Est. $300,000 – 375,000

Lot 141 – 1973 Porsche 911S 2.4L Coupe – Est. $250,000 – 325,000

Lot 148 – 1966 Porsche 912 Coupe – Est. $55,000 – 75,000

Lot 160 – 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2L Coupe – Est. $90,000 – 120,000

RM SOTHEBY’S – 

RM Sotheby’s seems to be skewing a little bit toward the modern collectible Porsche special editions and rarities. With a number of 997 and 991 lots in its auction, this isn’t a major surprise when they tend to sell for significantly over what they cost new. If you buy a rare example of a Porsche with limited deliveries, chances are you’ll make a mint at auction just a few years later (or in some cases months).

Lot 155 – 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7L Touring – Est. $400,000 – 500,000 

This is an exceedingly rare example of one of Porsche’s most iconic cars. The ducktailed Carrera RS is highly sought after by collectors, and this late production example finished in gorgeous Bahia Red is spectacular. This example has been lightly restored and some of its bodywork has been replaced and repainted. Because it isn’t 100% original, and because it isn’t a series 1 example, this Carrera RS can be had at a fraction of the cost of the more « perfect » examples. Purchase this one, don’t feel bad about wailing on it, and have one of the best Porsche driving experiences available to humans.

Lot 107 – 1964 Porsche 356 SC GT « Outlaw » – Est. $200,000 – 275,000

Lot 112 – 1996 Porsche 911 Turbo – Est. $200,000 – 250,000

Lot 138 – 1957 Porsche 356A 1600 Speedster – Est. $300,000 – 350,000

Lot 150 – 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS – Est. $250,000 – 300,000

Lot 156 – 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S – Est. $300,000 – 350,000

Lot 172 – 2016 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS Rennsport Reunion Edition – Est. $175,000 – 225,000

Lot 177 – 1965 Porsche 911 2.0L Coupe – Est. $150,000 – 180,000

Lot 183 – 1960 Porsche Diesel Junior 109 – Est. $30,000 – 40,000

Lot 206 – 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa « Outlaw » – Est. $40,000 – 50,000

Lot 207 – 1969 Porsche 911E Coupe – Est. $65,000 – 75,000

Lot 208 – 1974 Porsche 911 « Outlaw » – Est. $80,000 – 110,000

Lot 209 – 1973 Porsche 911S 2.4L Coupe – Est. $175,000 – 200,000

Lot 210 – 1987 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe – Est. $75,000 – 100,000

Lot 211 – 1969 Porsche 911T 2.0L Coupe – Est. $90,000 – 120,000

Lot 212 – 1987 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe – Est. $75,000 – 100,000

Lot 213 – 1970 Porsche 911E 2.2L Coupe – Est. $75,000 – 85,000

Lot 215 – 2010 Porsche 911 Sport Classic – Est. $400,000 – 500,000

Lot 234 – 2011 Porsche 911 Speedster – Est. $350,000 – 375,000

Lot 245 – 2018 Porsche 911 Turbo S Exclusive Series – Est. $375,000 – 450,000

Lot 249 – 1973 Porsche 911S 2.4L Targa – Est. $150,000 – 200,000

Lot 250 – 1958 Porsche 356 Speedster – Est. $300,000 – 400,000

Lot 271 – 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Weissach Package – Est. $450,000 – 550,000

Lot 281 – 1971 Porsche 911T 2.2L Targa – Est. $100,000 – 125,000

RUSSO & STEELE – 

Russo & Steele have never really focussed on getting the best and brightest Porsche offerings, but with a few late model aircooled models, a few modified cars, and a single blue-chip 356 lot, they’ve got a little bit of everything.

Lot 6228 – 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo Modified By ANDIAL – No Estimate Available

This 993 Turbo has a full kit of ANDIAL bits, including a number of parts from Porsche’s racing efforts in the late 1990s. With larger turbos and intercoolers, this aircooled monster now makes over 600 horsepower. The ANDIAL performance package was an additional $40,000 on top of the 993 Turbo purchase price. If you want a semi-vintage car that will hang with modern supercars, this is the one for you.

Lot 6302 – 1962 Porsche 356B T6 Super 90 Cabriolet – No Estimate Available

Lot 6237 – 2007 Porsche 911 GT3 RS GMG Racing 4.0L Conversion – No Estimate Available

Lot 6100 – 1980 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe – No Estimate Available

Lot 6089 – 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Cabriolet – No Estimate Available

Lot 6313 – 2004 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 40th Anniversary Edition – No Estimate Available

Lot 6215 – 1977 Porsche 911 2.7L Targa – No Estimate Available

Lot 6152 – 1958 Porsche Diesel 108K Junior – No Estimate Available

Lot 6120 – 1976 Porsche 914 2.0L – No Estimate Available

BARRETT-JACKSON – 

Barrett-Jackson is trying very hard to break its image as an auction house exclusively for hot rods and muscle cars. With a serious selection of Porsches in the house, it just might work. While there are a few lots that aren’t really enthusiast-aimed, like the unusually large number of low-buck old Cayennes, this is still a place you should pay attention to if you’re looking for a Collector Porsche.

Lot 1575 – 2005 Porsche 911 Carrera VF Supercharged – No Estimate Available

This early 997 model has been fitted with a huge supercharger from VF Engineering. With dyno sheets backing up a claim of 672 horsepower, this car is a serious performance machine. With tons of internal modifications, the car still looks largely stock on the outside. Nobody suspects a 13 year old silver Porsche to have nearly 700 horses. Anything worth doing is worth doing to excess.

Lot 1414 – 2005 Porsche Carrera GT – No Estimate Available

This Carrera GT is almost like new with just 5,031 miles on the odometer. It’s never been used the way it should have been. It’s been in California its entire life, sitting in a climate controlled collection. Having passed through two owners, the most recent one giving the car a full service at Rusnak Porsche (likely at not insignificant expense), this car still remains as original. Thankfully, the car was recently fitted with a set of modern Michelin Pilot Super Sport tires, and it’s ready for a new owner that will actually drive it.

Lot 37 – 2004 Porsche Cayenne Turbo – No Estimate Available

Lot 42 – 2002 Porsche Boxster 2.7L – No Estimate Available

Lot 79 – 2004 Porsche Cayenne Turbo – No Estimate Available

Lot 88 – 2008 Porsche Cayman Tiptronic – No Estimate Available

Lot 93 – 2006 Porsche Cayenne Titanium – No Estimate Available

Lot 121 – 1986 Porsche 944 Turbo – No Estimate Available

Lot 125 – 2001 Porsche Boxster S – No Estimate Available

Lot 139.1 – 1975 Porsche 914 2.0L – No Estimate Available

Lot 218 – 1976 Porsche 914 2.0L – No Estimate Available

Lot 223 – 1957 Porsche 356 Speedster Replica – No Estimate Available

Lot 481.1 – 1970 Porsche 911T – No Estimate Available

Lot 482 – 2002 Porsche 911 Turbo – No Estimate Available

Lot 483 – 1983 Porsche 911 SC Cabriolet – No Estimate Available

Lot 502 – 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet – No Estimate Available

Lot 505.1 – 1994 Porsche 928 GTS – No Estimate Available

Lot 547 – 1997 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet – No Estimate Available

Lot 784 – 1965 Porsche 356C Coupe – No Estimate Available

Lot 946.1 – 2003 Porsche 911 Turbo – No Estimate Available

Lot 987.1 – 2002 Porsche 911 Turbo – No Estimate Available

Lot 1018.2 – 1960 Porsche 356B Coupe – No Estimate Available

Lot 1018.3 – 1986 Porsche 911 Turbo Custom Coupe – No Estimate Available

Lot 1029 – 1979 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe – No Estimate Available

Lot 1227 – 1961 Porsche 356B Super Coupe – No Estimate Available

Lot 1281 – 1982 Porsche 911 Turbo – No Estimate Available

Lot 1302 – 1979 Porsche 911 Turbo Custom Coupe – No Estimate Available

Lot 1304 – 1979 Porsche 911 Turbo – No Estimate Available

Lot 1341 – 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS – No Estimate Available

Lot 1342 – 1988 Porsche 911 Turbo – No Estimate Available

Lot 1413 – 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS – No Estimate Available

Lot 1460 – 1993 Porsche 911 RS America – No Estimate Available

Lot 1476 – 1982 Porsche 911 Custom Slant Nose Cabriolet Conversion – No Estimate Available

Lot 1481 – 1986 Porsche 911 Turbo – No Estimate Available

Lot 1508 – 2008 Porsche Cayenne GTS – No Estimate Available

Lot 1509 – 2009 Porsche Cayenne Turbo – No Estimate Available

Lot 1515 – 1999 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet – No Estimate Available

Lot 1520 – 2003 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe – No Estimate Available

Lot 1537 – 1957 Porsche 356 Speedster Replica – No Estimate Available

Lot 1553.1 – 2004 Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet – No Estimate Available

Lot 1600.1 – 2007 Porsche 911 Turbo – No Estimate Available

Lot 1693 – 2006 Porsche Cayenne – No Estimate Available

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Here Are The Most Expensive Porsches Ever Sold

Porsche’s fan favorite video series « Top 5 » is back for another season, and this time they’re tackling some truly interesting lists. To open the season, Porsche is focusing on the cars that made the brand famous, the ones with incredible pedigree and rarity, the ones that people spent gobs of money to buy at auction. Here is the list of the top five most expensive Porsches ever sold. How this list was made, I’m not entirely sure, as I know I’ve seen some Porsche cars sell for between the 3 and 5 million dollar range that are not listed here.

1. Porsche 917/30 Chassis #004 – $3,000,000

2. Porsche 550A Spyder Chassis #14S – $5,170,000

3. Porsche 911 GT1 Strassenversion Chassis WP0ZZ99ZWS396005 – $5,665,000

4. Porsche 956 Chassis #003 – $10,120,000

5. Porsche Gulf-Wyer 917K Chassis #024 – $14,080,000

If you want an explanation of why each of these cars is worth as much as they sold for, click the play button above and enjoy the smooth lilt of Ted Gushue’s voice describing exactly thus. I don’t know about you, but I’m definitely looking forward to next week’s Top Five Fastest Porsches of All Time video, despite already knowing the answers.

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PROJECT GOLD: THE TRUE STORY

It’s a fascinating venture which has stirred up sizeable interest, partly because we never thought this could happen: we’re in the year 2018 and Porsche has just built an air-cooled 911, some two decades after its last. Incredibly, the car has just sold at auction for a whopping $3.1million too, so it might well be the ultimate collector’s Porsche 911. But what do we really know about it? 

Okay, so it’s a remake of the 993 Turbo rather than a brand-new model, Porsche giving Project Gold, as it’s been dubbed, a chassis number following directly on from the last 993 Turbo rolling off the production line in 1998. Finished in Golden metallic, the car is modelled as an air-cooled version of the 991 Turbo S Exclusive Edition, this 993 built by Porsche Classic using its enviable itinerary of some 52,000 genuine Porsche Classic parts.

There is an air of cynicism surrounding this project, though. Porsche says the car was built from the last remaining 993 Turbo shell it had ‘laying around’; emissions regulations mean it can’t be registered and thus driven on public roads, and those same reasons are precisely why the car won’t be present at its own auction lot at RM Sotheby’s Porsche sale at PEC Atlanta – in fact, it won’t be in the US at all. Then there’s the spec: Porsche states the Turbo’s flat six produces 450hp, which means it comes with the coveted Powerkit, standard on the Exclusive-built 993 Turbo S. The optional side air intakes are Turbo S-spec, as is the carbon dashboard.

In fact, Project Gold is a set of yellow calipers away from being a fully loaded 993 Turbo S rather than a mere Turbo. However, Porsche has opted against branding it as such, likely because that would have left the 345 owners worldwide of the 993 Turbo S extremely upset that their investment-grade collectible had lost a modicum of rarity. It certainly smacks of marketing fanfare, but is this fair? Uwe Makrutzki, manager at Porsche AG’s Classic factory restoration team, and Philipp Salm, sales and marketing manager at Porsche Classic, have joined us at Rennsport Reunion to dispel the myths.

We ask first about that lone spare shell. “It’s not unusual to have spare parts when you change from one generation to another. In the case of the 993 to 996 we had a spare 993 Turbo shell – only one – which was stored in an outdoor hall in a town called Möglingen,” Uwe tells us matter-of-factly. “We’d known about the shell for years but didn’t have the desire to do anything with it. Then we were asked to do something for the 70 years of Porsche celebrations.

For the full exposé on Project Gold, pick up your copy of Total 911 issue 172, in shops now or available for direct delivery to your door. You can also download the issue, which features bonus image galleries, to any Apple or Android device. 

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