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997 GT2 RS

Our Favorite Porsches On Ebay: Volume 110

We’ve been compiling some amazing Porsche models on eBay for nearly three years now, and we’ve seen some pretty astonishing cars pop up now and again. This week we’re throwing any pretense of theme out the window for a five-car mashup of greatness. Hopefully you’ve enjoyed our curated look at the Porsche market. Keep in mind, some of these Porsches could be great collection investments, while others might prove to do more financial harm than good.

INTERESTED IN HAVING YOUR PORSCHE FEATURED HERE?

Every other week, we feature 5 of our favorite Porsches on eBay. That post is sent out to our mailing list of more than 17,000 Porsche owners and fans and is seen by 10s of thousands of other readers who visit our site directly. If you’re selling a Porsche on eBay and would like to see it featured here, just shoot us an email with the details and we’ll be back in touch. Otherwise, feel free to check out all the other eBay listings we have on our Porsches for sale pages.

1. 1974 Porsche 911 Rinspeed Slantnose For Sale

This car has been kitted out with the full 1980s look, likely done completely in-period. It looks a bit kitschy, a little wrong, and totally anachronistic, which is part of why we love it. Aside from the ‘Turbo’ badge on the back of the car, this car has the full package. So as not to be labeled a poser, we would have to either remove the badge or add a turbocharged engine, and it’s pretty easy to tell which way we’d prefer to go. These mid-year 2.7-liter cars had a lot of issues, but if they’re all taken care of the cars can be quite a lot of fun to drive. With that aggressive 80s look, we’d have to dig a Style Auto jacket out of the back of our closet and go cruise the boulevards. This car is in Atlanta, but it belongs in Miami.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

2. 2009 Porsche Cayman S Interseries Race Car For Sale

If you’re looking for an incredible deal on a race car, this is a good place to start. The Interseries cars were built to the hilt with JRZ remote reservoir coilovers, a full cage, and lots of endurance race touches that will help keep you calm, cool, and collected during a race. These cars were built specifically for gentleman drivers to learn their craft, so they’re essentially just race prepped stock Caymans. You can jump in this thing and be running at 9/10ths within a few laps. Get this car and book a few sessions of driver education at the track to really work your way into it. It’s a great, if expensive, hobby to keep you busy.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

3. 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe For Sale

This 964 looks about as perfect as any 964 can. With a larger late model set of wheels that have been painted a dark bronze, the black bodywork of the car looks incredible juxtaposed. It sits a little lower than stock, and is equipped with big meaty sticky Continental rubber. The seller claims to have spent too much on this car in the short time he’s owned it. He added a Steve Wong chip, an aftermarket exhaust, Wheels, Tires, H&R lowering springs, aero-style mirrors, and a few thousand dollars on maintenance. Carrera 4s are rarely this expensive, but for the quality of this one it might be worth it.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

4. 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo For Sale

This 996 Turbo’s tiptronic transmission would normally be a no-go for me, but this time it has me thinking. This car appears to be in quite nice condition for the $38,000 dollar asking price, making it the perfect candidate for a high-power project car. The Tiptronic, for those who don’t know, is an incredibly stout automatic transmission, and the go-to for Porsche drag racers. With a huge horsepower engine, it would be interesting to take this thing to a top-speed competition like Texas Mile or even Bonneville (where AWD would be a boon). At some point, someone grafted what appears to be a 993 Turbo rear decklid to this 996, and it does not look good. That’s a perfect opportunity to swap it out for a Gemballa-style decklid, or maybe a GT2 fixed wing for a little more subtlety. In either case, I just love the color of this thing.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

5. 2011 Porsche 911 GT2 RS For Sale

Is there any reason to be surprised about a 997 GT2 RS making our list this week? These cars are possibly the wildest things Porsche has ever produced for the public, and this one is proper collector grade. With over 600 horsepower and a manual transmission, this car demands a lot of respect. It’s a lot more involved to drive than any of the company’s current products. The fact that this car’s successor, the PDK-equipped 700-horsepower 2018 model can be described as docile is almost a slap in the face of the 997 GT2 RS. Be afraid of this car, be white knuckled, be cognizant of the fact that you have to be on-edge driving this car, then bid accordingly.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

INTERESTED IN HAVING YOUR PORSCHE FEATURED HERE?

Every other week, we feature 5 of our favorite Porsches on eBay. That post is sent out to our mailing list of more than 17,000 Porsche owners and fans and is seen by 10s of thousands of other readers who visit our site directly. If you’re selling a Porsche on eBay and would like to see it featured here, just shoot us an email with the details and we’ll be back in touch. Otherwise, feel free to check out all the other eBay listings we have on our Porsches for sale pages.

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Five Porsche 911s I want to drive in 2017 – Editor’s choice

As I mentioned last week, 2016 was a very good year for bringing you a very high calibre of Porsche 911s in Total 911 magazine. Under a mantra of ‘onwards and upwards’, I’ve picked out five more models I’m intent on personally covering for you loyal readers in 2017. In reverse order, they are:

5) Porsche 964 Turbo 3.6

For me, the later 930 Turbo with G50 gearbox is one of the most enjoyable classic 911s to pilot. The 964 3.3 after that was merely a cosmetic upgrade for Porsche’s Turbo, but the later 3.6-litre was a different beast entirely. It still lags behind the twin-turbocharged 993 in terms of values, but there’s a reason Porsche wanted a second crack at the whip of the 964 Turbo. I’m betting this is going to become an all-time great, and a test drive will show if my money has been well placed.

A location shot of a blue porsche moving at speed along a country road. Shot outside in natural light.

 

4) Porsche 991.2 GTS

To be revealed early in 2017, The new 911 GTS will utilise a rendition of the new, turbocharged 9A2 flat six engine currently used for the Carrera and Carrera S models. Whether or not the new GTS coincides with a long-awaited Powerkit for the 991’s second-generation remains to be seen, but what is guaranteed is a superb sportscar for those who don’t want (or can’t get!) a new 991 GT3. Speaking of which…

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3) Porsche 991.2 GT3

The first generation’s story was as spectacular as its spec: revving all the way to 9,000rpm, the car also stole headlines for incidents involving the odd fire and a worldwide recall. I’ve no doubt the Gen2 car, which has already been confirmed as naturally aspirated, will be just as scintillating to drive, though its redline will likely be more in line with the 991 GT3 RS’s 8,600 maximum revs.

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2) Porsche 911 2.0 SWB

With all the 2017 talk surrounding new tech on new cars, a revisit to where it all began with the short wheelbase 911 2.0-litre will remind us of the 911’s more humble beginnings. Famed for its supposed snappy handling (a lengthening of the car’s wheelbase in 1968 helping to alleviate that), the early cars are rocketing in value as they become automotive antiques. We’ll get one on the road for you before they all disappear into collections.

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1) Porsche 997 GT2 RS

2017 looks set to mark the return for a fearsome GT2 with the famous Rennsport moniker, but it was the 997 GT2 RS that started the legend. With 700Nm of torque going through the rear wheels only, this won’t just be the best drive of the year for me, it’ll likely be the most, well, interesting, too!

Horizontal, tracking shot of a black Porsche 997 GT2 RS being driven round a race track, taken from a front 3/4 angle. Shot outside in natural lighting.

 

Which Porsche 911s would you like to see in Total 911 this year? Comment below or email [email protected]

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997 GT2: the last Widowmaker

The words provoke an awkward shuffle in my seat. “This road is the most dangerous in the UK according to the Road Safety Foundation,” I’m told as I shoot along the A285, a fast yet twisty route from Petworth to Chichester. It’s not the thought of the ill-fated road that’s caused my buttocks to clench though. Despite tackling the sweeping bends while carrying good speed, it’s the vehicle I’m in that’s the source of mild worry.

The 997 GT2 is the last in a long line of fearsome turbocharged Porsche 911s, served according to the usual GT2 recipe of big power garnished with minimal traction assistance. It’s a 911 that only the bravest of drivers dare pilot at the best of times, let alone on what my passenger has declared a road that’s a magnet for trouble. I Best keep my wits about me as I suss out this potent Porsche, then.

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Launched in 2007 as successor to the 996, the 997 GT2 is seemingly the last of its kind, throwing a mighty 530 horses of brutal forced-induction power at the road via the rear wheels only. Mediators in this 911-shaped fracas are the six-speed G97/88 gearbox as found in the GT3 (albeit with different ratios), along with lenient stability and traction controls, both of which can be turned off separately or altogether.

As scintillating as it is terrifying, the very remit of the GT2 is decidedly against anything Porsche currently offers in the 991 generation, where all GT models use the admittedly magnificent PDK semi-automatic gearbox and active rear-wheel steering, while all-wheel drive is bestowed upon any blown variant. Such huge engineering revisions to the chassis and drivetrain of new GT models makes the 997 GT2 feel like a comparable classic already – and it’s not yet a decade old, don’t forget.

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1,242 997 GT2s were built from 2007 to 2009, each costing £131,000 plus options. Despite a £30,000 levy over the Gen1 997 Turbo, the fire-breathing GT2 lured wallets from the pockets of many who found appeal in a 911 boasting elements of both Turbo and GT3 in its DNA.

The GT3 cues are obvious from the outset. While the feel of the soft Alcantara-lined steering wheel does justice to invoke visual connotations of its naturally aspirated GT sister, substance of the mechanicals between it and the wheels is provided by the time the first apex has been aimed at. The car’s steering is exquisitely weighted and makes for a glorious ode to the merits of mechanical power assistance.

To read more on our celebration of the 911 GT2, including our road test in 996 and 997 variants, as well as exclusive comments from Porsche on the 991, pick up Total 911 issue 127 in store now. Alternatively, you can order it for home delivery, or download it straight to your digital device.

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Opinion: seven reasons the 997 is the best generation of Porsche 911

We’ve had 51 years of brilliant 911s leaving the Werk II factory at Zuffenhausen, but which generation is the greatest? Many say it is the 993 as the pinnacle of automotive engineering with air cooling. Others say it is now the 964 (marking some turnaround from only five years ago. Where did all those oil leaks disappear to, I wonder?).

Then there’s the school of thought that suggests the pre-impact bumper era should rightfully be lavished with the crown due to the sheer purity offered by these wholly mechanical classics. Of course, there is a case for every 911 generation as the greatest, but I have difficulty in looking past the 997. Here’s why:

996
1) It represented a return to form after the 996
I’ve said before that we should forever be grateful to the 996 as the saviour of Porsche, but the reality is it’s still the marmite era of the entire 911 spectrum. The M96 engine is far from bulletproof (IMS, RMS, and scored bore horror stories should suitably confirm that one) and those runny-egg headlamps were a kick in the stomach for those who had long admired the simple, elegant vista of every single 911 pre-1998. Then there’s the 996’s interior, which fell short of Porsche’s usual high standards of luxury and opulence as cost-cutting became the new buzzword.

However, the 997 brought a much-needed return to traditional 911 aesthetics – admittedly through borrowing styling cues from the 993 – without the bulbous evolution of the longer and heavier 991s. The interior was completely overhauled with luxury once again in mind, too. Even better, 997 interiors have stood the test of time since, unlike the dated 996.

Engines also improved for the 997: despite suspect revelations about the early M97, it doesn’t suffer from the same reputation as the M96, while the DFI engines fitted to Gen2 997s are considered bullet-proof.
Make no mistake, the 997’s role should not be underestimated: if the 996 saved Porsche, the 997 saved the legacy of the 911 as we know it.

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2) It’s the last bastion of the mechanical 911
Sure, the 997 was bestowed with an entire catalogue of electronic driving aids such as PASM, VTG, PTM and PSM to name a few, but the takeover of the ECU only intensified under the subsequent 991. Most significantly, electric steering in all 991s plus PDK-only transmission and rear axle steering in the new GT and Turbo models have since boosted the profile of the purer 997.

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3) It’s the pinnacle of the ‘Mezger’ engine
The GT3 RS 4.0-litre was released as the ‘last hurrah’ of the 997 era, and it lived up to its reputation as one of the finest 911s ever built. With a huge 3,996cc engine capacity (you’ll struggle for bigger bores for the flat six than with the RS 4.0) helping to produce nearly 500bhp without a turbocharger in sight, this represents the finest road-going iteration of the famous ‘Mezger’ engine.

Its legacy is protected, too: the 991 GT3 has already ditched the ‘Mezger’ in favour of a reworked DFI Carrera S unit, perhaps an acceptance from Porsche that the engine had reached its maximum capabilities in RS 4.0 guise.

Porsche 911 Sport Classic und Speedster
4) The 997 still gave exclusivity
You can quite easily count over 30 different variants of the 997 before getting into difficulty, but don’t let that put you off the provenance of some variants in the generation. Despite this being the most mass-produced 911 to date, a selection of rare gems were made to keep you on the edge of your seat.

Only 356 Speedsters were made courtesy of the Exclusiv department, for example, while only 250 of the brilliantly nostalgic Sport Classic were produced. Meanwhile, all 918 units of the 997 Turbo S 918 Edition were reserved exclusively for those who had paid a deposit on the new Porsche 918 hypercar. Get your hands on any of these, not to mention a GT2 RS or GT3 RS 4.0 and you’ve got yourself a rare 911 indeed, more exclusive than even the 2.7RS.

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5) The RS went turbocharged
Sure, historical geeks will point out the Turbo RSR racer from 1974 to try and usurp my point here, but the 997 GT2 RS represented the first time Porsche had given the Rennsport badge to a road-going turbocharged 911. Moreover, it didn’t disappoint. The 997 GT2 RS is revered as one of the most extreme 911s ever to grace the road, and if you want one for your collection now, you’ll already need to pay considerably more than book price from first release.

VTG
6) VTG was introduced
The first generation 997 Turbo was introduced with a new technology: Variable Turbine Geometry. In layman terms this effectively gives the best of both small and large turbochargers thanks to electrically-operated guide vanes in each turbo helping to achieve optimum gas-flow characteristics at all times.

The result is noticeably reduced turbo lag and a wider band of peak torque. This gave turbocharged 997s unrelenting, savage performance right through the rev range, transforming the personality of the Turbo. The technology is still used by Porsche on the 991.

200mph
7) The 911 hit 200mph
Twice, in fact. After the 997 GT2 powered on to a confirmed 204mph in 2007, the GT2 RS beat it by 1mph three years later. No other factory 911 has passed the double-ton mark before or since.

To refine my point, I’m not suggesting every 997 model was the best of its kind. Far from it. However, it’s hard to deny that the 997 generation played a vital role in bringing the 911 at large back to form, all the while reaching a pinnacle in blending such blistering performance with modern purity, something no other past, present or future 911 generation is likely to be able to match.

Is the 997 the greatest Porsche 911 generation ever? Have your say in the comments below, or head to our Facebook and Twitter pages to join the debate now.

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