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sponsored: Commission your Porsche 911 as fine art

Many 911 owners would already consider their car to be a piece of automotive art – we certainly do – and gazing over the curvaceous bodywork can give many hours of pleasure.  But there’s more than one way to enjoy the stunning appearance, and having it committed to canvas would be special indeed. Which brings us to the work of renowned artist, Rob Hefferan. Fascinated with art since childhood, his first exhibition in 2003 showcasing his skills in figurative work and portraiture was a resounding success. It’s those skills along with an international reputation for quality and unrivalled attention to detail that has led to his work being commissioned by numerous celebrity clients, and it turns out that Rob has another passion; “I’ve been obsessed with cars since I was young, and that developed into a love for Porsches, and the 911 in particular”. 

A serial owner of our favourite sports car, his collection has included the 996, both generations of 997 model, and he now enjoys a 991 Carrera S. A proper car guy, then, which is why he’s decided to focus his talents on the Zuffenhausen marque, offering owners and enthusiasts the opportunity to have their pride and joy recreated as fine art. He admits this is a new challenge and one he relishes, already having set to work creating around a dozen paintings of various Porsches. While such artwork isn’t entirely new, what’s different here and core to Rob’s ethos is capturing even the smallest of details that make each car unique. And having seen it for ourselves we are talking about beautiful pieces of art here, the sort of work that would complement 911 ownership in a way that other pictures just can’t. Painted either in oils or acrylic depending on the timescales involved, each work can take anything from 150 to 300 hours to complete and the work is also unusual compared to other automotive artists in that he is happy to depict not just the car but to include the owner as well. It’s where the talent for portrait work really pays off. 

As for the process of commissioning a painting, an owner can either provide pictures of the car or Rob will travel to view your 911, employing a professional photographer to take dozens of detailed reference shots from which to work. It’s a painstaking process but one that results in something very special, but there was something we were keen to ask and that’s whether he had a favourite 911. “Not really” says Rob. “I love all of them, but if pushed I guess I’d have to say it’s the cars from the 1960’s that most capture my attention.”  “It’s the shape and form that I find so appealing, and the way the light falls on the bodywork. There are few cars like it, and I really admire Porsche’s heritage, especially when it comes to motorsport.” That emphasis on history and quality really shines through when it comes to the finished painting, and whether you own just the one car or are lucky enough to have a collection to see them represented in such a way is likely to prove very hard to resist. You can see examples of Rob’s work by visiting his website at http://www.robhefferanautomotiveart.com, but we’ll say now that you should be prepared to find yourself as tempted to commission his services as we are.

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Manthey Tuned Porsche 993 RSR Blitzes Around Nurburgring GP Circuit

One of just forty-five 993 RSRs in existence, this 3.8-liter monster is a rare sight. Despite the small numbers, those curvaceous haunches, massive tires, and snorkels in the rear make you wonder why this model is not as well known.

Perhaps this example deserves some special attention, since it’s Olaf Manthey’s very first racing car. A little over two decades ago, Manthey converted this from a 993 Cup car into an RSR. He elaborates on the version in this article: « The whole rear with fenders, bumpers and the tailgate was built from scratch. At the front, we relocated the oil coolers. We redesigned the air ducts so that the spent air was not routed underneath the car but dissipated on the side. We also designed the underfloor and the rear diffuser.” That last tweak made it particularly effective at the crowned and cambered Nordschleife, which wasn’t as smooth twenty years ago as it is today. This particular car enjoyed a lot of success at the Green Hell, which made Manthey’s reuniting with this car at last week’s AvD Oldtimer Grand Prix all the more special.

Since its retirement from professional racing in 2002, it’s enjoyed a few more tweaks and now produces little more power than a standard 993 RSR. Today, the M64/75 engine sends roughly 380 horsepower through a six-speed manual transmission. Powering a stripped frame weighing just 2,425 pounds, it is strikingly quick for something not too powerful by today’s standards. Just witness the way it sits nicely at corner exits and accrues speed down the Nurburgring GP circuit’s straights. Unfortunately the footage doesn’t capture the incredible bark of the car well, but the link below certainly does.

Those beautiful BBS rims tucked underneath the flared arches, a short wheelbase, and that elaborate rear wing make the 993 RSR a feast for the eyes.

For an onboard experience with the 993 RSR, watch Leh Keen at work in one here.

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A Windshield Installation That Costs As Much as a Boxster S: Making Your Own 993 Speedster

The trouble with limited-run Porsche models is there simply aren’t enough to go around, and the 993 Speedster is among the most extreme cases. When Porsche launched a 911-based Speedster in 1989, they initially built 800. When they re-launched the Speedster with the 964 generation in 1994 they made just 936. When the 993 came around, things were even more limited. Porsche built just two- one for Butzi Porsche, and one a few years later for Jerry Seinfeld. If you want a 993 Speedster and don’t have a deep, personal connection to either of those two, you need to make your own.

Headlines get views, but a $50k windscreen undersells the challenges of getting the screen on the car. Making a Speedster from a 993 is far more than buying a hilariously expensive piece of glass and bolting it in. According to owner John Sarkisyan fitting the screen involved more than $10k in fabrication, to say nothing of additional thousands to bring the doors and side windows to Speedster standard. Just converting the glass on this car crossed the $70k mark- or about as much as a new Boxster S.

While widebody Porsches are going to be polarizing by there very nature- especially cars that are less track-oriented, we appreciate John’s commitment to his vision. Each of his creations brings a unique aesthetic, top-notch interior, and a singular vision to the car in question. It doesn’t matter if the car is a 356, a 912, or even an SLK32 AMG-turned Mercedes Gullwing, John gives each car a truly unique flair.

What do you think of this unique Speedster creation?

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930 v 964 v 993: air-cooled Turbos

This is the story of an action hero: one who starts as a trigger-happy maverick, becomes all-powerful, then ends up going straight. Well, that’s the Hollywood version at least.

The truth about the air-cooled 911 Turbo – from 930 to 964 and 993 – is harder to sum up in a sound bite. So dim the lights, grab some popcorn and settle in for a saga of sequels without equal.

Posing outside the Paul Stephens showroom in Essex, our Turbo trilogy makes for a great movie poster. They’re The Expendables in four-wheeled form: brimful of testosterone and bulging in all the right places.

The 964 Turbo 3.6 has the most visual clout, crouched like a coiled spring on dished Speedline split-rims. It’s one of the most aesthetically aggressive 911s, on par with the 993 GT2 and 991.2 GT2 RS.

The 930 isn’t far behind, its fulsome hips and signature spoiler immortalised on a million bedroom walls. And the 993 Turbo is equally iconic, albeit smoother and more urbane.

The 964, built in 3.6-litre guise for the final year of production only, is also our A-lister in terms of price. At the time of writing it was offered at £224,995 – enough to buy both the 930 and 993.

Is it the big-budget blockbuster those looks suggest, or does the sweet-spot of this air-cooled 911 line-up lie elsewhere? I’m childishly excited to find out.

I start with the 930. ‘The Widowmaker’ shares its epithet with a movie about a nuclear submarine, and its presence feels equally forbidding. However, it could have been much wilder.

Inspired by the on-track success of the turbocharged 917/30, the prototype 930 was a back-to-basics road racer – effectively a Carrera 3.0 RS with forced induction – and just 200 cars were planned. Porsche’s sales and marketing department had other ideas, though, envisioning the 911 Turbo as a luxurious super-GT.

In the end profit triumphed over purity, and the Turbo debuted in 1975 with air conditioning, electric windows, a rear wiper and a four-speaker stereo. Climbing aboard, this flagship 1987 911 still feels well-appointed today.

There’s supple leather, deep-pile carpet and even heated seats. Only the boost gauge, nestled within the rev counter, offers a clue to its added oomph. Well, that and the four ratios etched atop the gear lever – the SC had switched to five-speed back in 1978.

The original 3.0-litre 930 served up 260hp: a modest 63hp more than a contemporary Carrera 3.0, and Golf GTI power today. Even so, edgy handling and all-or-nothing power delivery made it a challenging steer.

Le Mans-winning Porsche racer Tony Dron said: “Frankly, it demanded too much skill, even from an experienced driver, and that made serious driving hard work… I was far from convinced that selling them to the public was a good idea.” An upgrade to 3.3-litres and 300hp in 1978 also included beefier 917 brakes and a more stable chassis. This had “better handling, but was still something of a monster when driven really fast”, noted Dron.

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OUR FAVORITE PORSCHES FOR SALE THIS WEEK: VOLUME 136

We’ve been compiling some amazing Porsche models on the internet for over five years now, and we’ve seen some pretty astonishing examples pop up now and again. This week the weather has been nice, so we’re looking to get out and hit the track day circuit. Here are a bunch of cars ready and willing to head for laps at your favorite circuit. Hopefully you’ve enjoyed our « curated » look at the Porsche market. Keep in mind, some of these Porsches could be great collection investments, while others might prove to do more financial harm than good.

INTERESTED IN HAVING YOUR PORSCHE FEATURED HERE?

Every other week, we feature 5 of our favorite Porsches for sale. That post is sent out to our mailing list of more than 17,000 Porsche owners and fans and is seen by tens of thousands of other readers who visit our site directly. If you’re selling a Porsche on eBay and would like to see it featured here, just shoot us an email with the details and we’ll be back in touch. Otherwise, feel free to check out all the other eBay listings we have on our Porsches for sale pages.

1. 2009 Porsche GT3 Cup For Sale

What could possibly go wrong with a decade old Porsche race car that has been driven hard its entire life? This one was recently given a thorough going-through with an engine, transmission, and suspension rehash just two operating hours ago. The great thing about a 997 GT3 Cup is that it is old enough to be not quite so expensive, and new enough that there are plenty of shops willing to work on it and set it up for you.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

2. 1988 Porsche 928 S4 Track Car For Sale

You wouldn’t normally think of a 928 as being a good track car, but this one is completely set up for racing or track days with a nice solid roll cage built in. The limited slip differential and 5-speed manual make this a great starting point, and once you pull out a lot of the things that make a 928 exceedingly heavy, it might have the potential to perform pretty well on course. If for no other reason than it has a nice rowdy V8 under the hood.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

3. 1997 Porsche 911 3.8 RSR For Sale

Back in the days of 993, the RSR was a track king. These days it’s a collector special, but it would be an absolute boss move to show up to your next HPDE event with a twenty-plus year old superstar. The last of the naturally-aspirated aircooled race car monsters, this RSR deserves to be set free on a race track once again. Be the hero to let it roam.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

4. 2006 Porsche Cayman Track Car For Sale

For my money, a 987 Cayman that has received some moderate track preparation is the best place to start if you are addicted to Porsche and track time. For one thing, this car is among the most forgiving and capable chassis Porsche has ever built. It’s compliant and quick, and will instantly instill confidence. It rewards consistency, but won’t punish mistakes the same way the 993 above would. For another thing, spares are inexpensive and easy to come by.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

5. 2011 Porsche Cayman Race Car For Sale

And if a Cayman track car is good, then a Cayman race car is even better. Prepared for the GX class at the 24 hours of Daytona, this Cayman features a 3.8-liter engine from an X51 Carrera GTS 997, producing a whopping 405 horsepower. The seller claims more than a quarter million was spent preparing this car, and based on the parts list I believe it. It placed second on the podium in the 2013 Daytona 24, and would serve you quite well at almost any race track. Go chase GT3s with this high powered Cayman.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

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