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991 gt2 rs

Is a 911 GT2 RS Faster Than A 918 Spyder at Hockenheim?

Unlike many cars of its ilk, this GT2 RS sees a great deal of track time. Whether it be racing against current GT3 Cup cars or highly modified Nissan GT-Rs, sebastian vittel’s RS is a regular sight at tracks across France and Germany. It’s been given a few tasteful modifications to suit it to the regular beating it takes; utilizing Endless pads, steel brakes, taller wing supports from a GT3 RS, and a Manthey alignment for even more purchase on the pavement. As we see in the footage below, its performance is enough to run with the 918 Spyder—a car which costs nearly six times as much. This stellar performance makes you wonder whether the GT2 RS is merely the quickest 911 on the market today, or if it’s the defacto Porsche flagship of recent years.

Despite having only two driven wheels, the GT2 RS actually betters the four-wheel drive 918 Spyder in low-speed acceleration. This is a real asset at the tight and technical Hockenheim, where strong speed out of the hairpins leading onto the long straights pays dividends. It’s the turbocharged, two-wheel drive GT2 RS which excels in these slow-speed acceleration zones, and only once they have room to stretch their legs a bit does the 918 stretch a small lead. Not exactly what one would think when considering the specs, eh?

Weighing roughly 500 pounds more than the GT2 RS, the 918 isn’t quite the agile thing that the latest RS is, but it has a habit of belying its weight and putting it to lighter, more powerful cars. So much of that comes down to the way the 918 makes great use of its hybrid power when driven through all four wheels. With minimal wheelspin and wild torque from zip, shouldn’t that make it the king of hairpins?

Only once is vittel beaten off a hairpin (1:50), but it’s his too-early entry that’s to blame.

Well, sebastian vittel once again proves the versatility of the RS with this duel. Granted, these two aren’t pushing more than 8/10ths, the 918 isn’t exactly track-tuned, and traffic does allow vittel to close the gap after the hypercar begins to walk away. Nevertheless, it’s a strong showing from both, but it’s the RS which looks even stronger after making quick work of what ought to be the quickest in the Porsche stable.

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993 v 991: wild Porsche GT2s

The year 1994 offered something of a step change for Porsche Motorsport. After multiple notable racing successes with naturally aspirated 911s such as the Carrera RSR and RS 3.8, the company once again turned its attention to turbocharging for elite GT racing. A new car was born out of the 993 generation, wider and wilder than ever before. The name given to this new high-performance 911 was simply the racing class it was to participate in: let us say hello once again to the now-legendary 993 GT2.

However, these cars were badged ‘GT’ – as can be seen below its huge rear wing. To compete in this class Porsche had to manufacture and homologate a street version, which became available as early as April of 1995. Little did Porsche and 911 enthusiasts know at the time, but it would become an absolute icon of a car, and one of the most sought-after today.

Unlike the car it was based on – the new 993 Turbo – the GT2 offered 22bhp more and offered a host of upgrades to the drivetrain, body, suspension and equipment, to name but a few. The big news was that the GT2 would be rear-wheel drive only, the 200kg weight loss over a Turbo mainly being attributed to this change. With the GT2 Porsche had made it perfectly clear it was not about to relinquish the ominous widowmaker moniker too easily. Rear-wheel-drive 911 Turbos were until then aimed at the more experienced driver, but the change to four-wheel drive left a gap at the very top of the 911 range, one that was to be filled by the motorsport-inspired GT2 street car.

Fast forward more than 20 years and until recently customers had to look to the naturally aspirated GT3 RS model to have race-inspired thrills. However, as a final swansong to the 991 range, Andreas Preuninger and his GT team developed and manufactured the most powerful production 911 to date. One can ramble on about the finer details of this machine, which you would have read in previous issues of Total 911, but there is no better way to sum it up than the 6:47.25 time the 991 GT2 RS set around the infamous Nürburgring Nordschleife.

In South Africa where the owner of both these exquisite cars opens the garage door, I find myself subconsciously drifting towards the 993 GT2 first. The door feels light in my hand as I pull its handle. I lower myself into the Recaro bucket seat and shut the door, the thud reminiscent of a whole era of air-cooled Porsche. The seat offers side support from your hips all the way up to your shoulders – the goosebumps on my forearms already demonstrate this is an exceptional place to be!

The cabin is basic, but not Clubsport or race car basic; after all, this is the more comfortable ‘Strasse’ specification. However, there are no rear seats, only carpets with the neat ‘GT’ inscription, as is the case on the back of the car below the rear wing. The cabin is compact – you sit close to the dashboard and windscreen in classic 911 guise. I hold the leather-trimmed, three-spoke steering wheel, impressed by the fact there is not a button in sight.

I’ve been privileged enough to have driven a few 993 GT2s before, and every time it is a particularly memorable occasion. Today is no different. A quick peek in the side mirror gets me all excited again as those monstrous, tacked-on wheel arches fill the view. These were added to enable the GT2’s enormous 11-inch-wide wheels to fit under its arches.

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Mark Webber Hustles the GT2 RS Clubsport Around Bathurst

In a world of clean-cut, politically correct sportsmen, Mark Webber is refreshingly honest, humorous, and occasionally a bit rude. Webber is candid and transparent in front of the camera, which makes his love for the Porsche marque all the more special; he’s never playing the insincere corporate spokesman.

With a two-day beard and an open-faced helmet, Webber hops into the fearsome GT2 RS Clubsport and threads the track toy around Mt. Panorama with the smooth style which made him such a success. As part of the Bathurst 12 Hour, Webber ran a series of demonstration laps in the GT2 RS Clubsport.

Webber posing against 1 of the 200 GT2 RS Clubsports.

Though he hadn’t driven the track since 1995, when he raced there in Formula Ford, Webber clearly got up to speed quickly and had no problems brushing the barriers coming over the hill. In fact, the speeds he reached down the Conrod Straight dwarfed whatever the Formula Ford could muster.

“The last time I drove at Bathurst was 24 years ago in the Formula Ford. Driving now on this wonderful circuit with this sports car was a sensational experience for me,” says the world endurance champion of 2015. “It’s incredible how much punch the engine has. Although I wasn’t driving at the maximum racing speed, I still reached 296 km/h at the end of the straight. Crazy!”

Even driving below the limit, Webber hit 183 miles an hour down the Conrod Straight.

Even after an illustrious career in the world’s fastest cars, the GT2 RS Clubsport still wows the gritty Aussie—a testament to the seriousness of the build. Webber may have retired from competition in 2016, but it’s clear that he’s not quite ready to give up on the thrill of driving some of the greatest cars in the world.

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Project Flatnose: The Secret Development of the Porsche 935

From the middle of 2017 until its release at Rennsport Reunion last September, the 935 project was a hush-hush affair. Nobody knew of the small-batch successor until its unveiling, and the team had to work quietly and quickly. Even other departments weren’t aware of the development of « Project Flatnose. »

The striking appearance of the car is the result of the vision of Grant Larson—the man responsible for gems like the 997 Carrera and the Carrera GT. The exterior design had to be designed in just four days, which meant one shot at making the car turn heads.

This project was special because of all the freedom we had. There wasn’t going to be any homologation, so both we and the engineers were free to design as we wished,” said Grant.

However, the upside to having to work at a feverish pace meant they had carte blanche where the visual design was concerned. By taking cues from the original Moby Dick, they established the foundation. The flatnose design, headlights mounted in the massive front intakes, and flowing Martini livery were clearly linked to the original. The rear took a modern twist with the elongated bodywork, the recessed taillights and tunnel-like shell mimicking the massive venturi tunnel underneath.

The rear end of the 935 is pure fighter jet.

« The engineers were onboard earlier than usual in the design process. We normally join the process in the wind tunnel stage at the latest, but with the new 935 we were already included at the design studio phase—it created a special group dynamic,” said Matthias Scholz.

Unshackled by restrictions, fueled by the success of the past, brought together by the unique conditions present, the team put together a truly unique thoroughbred. It seems the pressure and the urgency actually helped here. The team have turned out a stunning, and stunningly fast, Porsche.

Grant’s skilled hands sketching out the wild shape of the 935.

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Our Favorite Porsches For Sale This Week: Volume 129

We’ve been compiling some amazing Porsche models on eBay for a few years now, and we’ve seen some pretty astonishing examples pop up now and again. This week we’re going to try something different by integrating other auto sales outlets into our Porsche search. Hopefully you’ve enjoyed our « curated » look at the Porsche market. Keep in mind, some of these Porsches could be great collection investments, while others might prove to do more financial harm than good.

INTERESTED IN HAVING YOUR PORSCHE FEATURED HERE?

Every other week, we feature 5 of our favorite Porsches for sale. That post is sent out to our mailing list of more than 17,000 Porsche owners and fans and is seen by 10s of thousands of other readers who visit our site directly. If you’re selling a Porsche on eBay and would like to see it featured here, just shoot us an email with the details and we’ll be back in touch. Otherwise, feel free to check out all the other eBay listings we have on our Porsches for sale pages.

1. Low Mile 1997 Porsche 993 C4S For Sale

To portray the importance of this car, simply look to the logo of the website in the upper left corner. This Forest Green metallic 993 C4S with Cashmere interior was the inspiration for the very beginning of this website. Before we were FlatSixes, we were Porsche Purist, and before that 993C4S.com. The speeding 993 C4S logo has been with us since the beginning, both as inspiration for the site, and one of the driving forces behind it. There is hardly a nicer example out there, and certainly none in such a rare shade with so many Porsche Exclusive options. Add this gorgeous machine to your collection, because it deserves to be cared for.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on Sloan Motor Cars.

2. Low Mile 1986 Porsche 944 Turbo For Sale

I recently purchased a 1986 Porsche 944 Turbo of my own, but it’s got far more miles than this one. This year car is a strange one-year combination of early and late 944 suspension bits, and thus some pieces are difficult to come by. That said, it’s a handling dream, and the later « oval dash » interior looks surprisingly modern. This one with a Guards Red exterior and Porsche Script seats is not likely to be inexpensive, but it’ll be worth every single penny.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on Bring A Trailer.

3. CHEAP 2002 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 For Sale

There isn’t much to say about this 996 Carrera 2, except that the price is ludicrously inexpensive. It’s got nearly 200,000 miles on the odometer, the car is wrapped an interesting shade of copper, and the MY02 wheels have been painted black. Aside from that, it looks complete and the interior is clean. This is a Tiptronic model, so don’t expect it to be the most engaging thing ever, but at under 12 grand, you can’t really go wrong. It’s worth more than that in parts.

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

4. 8-Mile 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS For Sale

It isn’t very often you’re presented with the opportunity to unwrap a brand new Porsche, but this GT2 RS is still presented in as-delivered condition. It’s a Chalk GT2 RS Weissach with a red interior and carbon buckets. The sticker on this is $340,000, but the seller is asking a $90,000 premium for you to be the first official owner of this car. Is it worth that to you?

For more pictures, pricing and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

5. Low Mile Porsche 996 Turbo For Sale

The 996 Turbo remains one of my favorite Porsches, in large part because of the performance that it offers for such little money. These have seen prices wax and wane, but don’t expect this one to go for stupid cheap. A low mile black car with a 6-speed manual is a rarity, especially with a complete Aerokit intact. This might be the one to have. There’s no telling how high this Porsche will go on Bring A Trailer, but I would be surprised to see it crest $80,000. All things considered, it might be worth that.

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