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sponsored: Commission your Porsche 911 as fine art

Many 911 owners would already consider their car to be a piece of automotive art – we certainly do – and gazing over the curvaceous bodywork can give many hours of pleasure.  But there’s more than one way to enjoy the stunning appearance, and having it committed to canvas would be special indeed. Which brings us to the work of renowned artist, Rob Hefferan. Fascinated with art since childhood, his first exhibition in 2003 showcasing his skills in figurative work and portraiture was a resounding success. It’s those skills along with an international reputation for quality and unrivalled attention to detail that has led to his work being commissioned by numerous celebrity clients, and it turns out that Rob has another passion; “I’ve been obsessed with cars since I was young, and that developed into a love for Porsches, and the 911 in particular”. 

A serial owner of our favourite sports car, his collection has included the 996, both generations of 997 model, and he now enjoys a 991 Carrera S. A proper car guy, then, which is why he’s decided to focus his talents on the Zuffenhausen marque, offering owners and enthusiasts the opportunity to have their pride and joy recreated as fine art. He admits this is a new challenge and one he relishes, already having set to work creating around a dozen paintings of various Porsches. While such artwork isn’t entirely new, what’s different here and core to Rob’s ethos is capturing even the smallest of details that make each car unique. And having seen it for ourselves we are talking about beautiful pieces of art here, the sort of work that would complement 911 ownership in a way that other pictures just can’t. Painted either in oils or acrylic depending on the timescales involved, each work can take anything from 150 to 300 hours to complete and the work is also unusual compared to other automotive artists in that he is happy to depict not just the car but to include the owner as well. It’s where the talent for portrait work really pays off. 

As for the process of commissioning a painting, an owner can either provide pictures of the car or Rob will travel to view your 911, employing a professional photographer to take dozens of detailed reference shots from which to work. It’s a painstaking process but one that results in something very special, but there was something we were keen to ask and that’s whether he had a favourite 911. “Not really” says Rob. “I love all of them, but if pushed I guess I’d have to say it’s the cars from the 1960’s that most capture my attention.”  “It’s the shape and form that I find so appealing, and the way the light falls on the bodywork. There are few cars like it, and I really admire Porsche’s heritage, especially when it comes to motorsport.” That emphasis on history and quality really shines through when it comes to the finished painting, and whether you own just the one car or are lucky enough to have a collection to see them represented in such a way is likely to prove very hard to resist. You can see examples of Rob’s work by visiting his website at http://www.robhefferanautomotiveart.com, but we’ll say now that you should be prepared to find yourself as tempted to commission his services as we are.

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Is A 911 Turbo the Perfect Getaway Car?

You’re in 1980s England and you’ve got a case full of « powder » and some unsavory types on your tail in a flash Land Rover. Hop in the 930 and blast off, chap!

This little video was created by the folks at Hagerty UK as a way to promote next weekend’s upcoming Radwood UK. The event will be at Goodwood Motor Circuit on Sunday, August 11th. In the interest of full disclosure, I am one of the co-founders of Radwood, and I will be travelling to the UK for this show, so if you’re in the area stop in and say hello!

Now, I won’t give away the ending of this quick little chase video, but I will say it’s well worth watching for the humor of it all. And, you know, for the glorious turbocharged flat-six engine note!

https://youtu.be/THDYYGy9n4s

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Porsche 930 3.0: reviving an icon

There are few icons greater in the Porsche stratosphere than the 930 3.0. The first 911 supercar, Porsche’s Turbo nomenclature has survived to this day – and it all began in 1974 with that wide-arched and whale-tailed 930.

Today, those early 3.0-litre cars are highly sought-after among collectors as the archetypal Porsche 911 Turbo. Finding one is the biggest task, particularly from the first model year of 1975 when just 274 examples were built for worldwide markets. It is estimated only 20-30 of these original cars exist today.

From there, condition and provenance is key – which is why we believe this example, expertly curated by Mash Motor, to be one of the best examples of early 930 3.0 on the planet. Brilliantly restored (though still retaining original parts including the 930’s thicker carpets) car no. 55 of that original 274 is a special car.

Delivered on March 5th 1975 to Porsche Centre Autorama in Verona, Italy, as an exhibition car, chassis 5700065 was bought by a Swiss customer. It subsequently lived in Austria, owned by the renowned Porsche author, Dr. Georg Konradsheim, before being sold to its current owners who recently completed a painstaking two-year restoration to bring the matching-numbers car back to its original Copper brown hue.

Cover star of our issue 181, chassis 5700065 is one of the best examples of 930 we’ve driven. Below you’ll find a gallery of the car’s thorough restoration back to 100% original specification. This special 930 is now for sale – interested parties should contact Mash Motor.

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Ride Along For A Frantic Lap Around the ‘Ring in a 1976 Porsche Turbo

Though the Widowmaker strikes fear into the hearts of many, this footage suggests it’s not necessarily as fearsome as its reputation suggests. While it wouldn’t be fair to call it a pussycat, this example looks approachable by a talented shoe. Granted, the car here is heavily modified and the man in the seat is one of the best instructors at the Nurburgring, but it shows that the classic 911 Turbo can be tamed with a delicate touch.

It looks slightly pushy at turn-in, but the car is planted and settled under throttle. It even leaps out of corners with a hint of oversteer here and there (4:29). Predictable enough, but its high-speed manners are what are the most surprising. It looks friendly—almost tame, and though the steering writhes around in Andreas Gülden’s hands, it looks like the most laborious part of driving the car is rowing that shifter!

Such a confidence-inspiring car is a huge asset during the 24 Hour Classic, where serious speed differentials separate the pros in faster cars from the hordes of playful amateurs in mildly modded E30s. As a result, quick decisions must be made frequently.

Gülden’s negotiation of traffic is even more impressive than his stylish and understated driving. Huge traffic jams decorate the 16.12-mile course (7:34), and he can quickly switch his pace from banzai to drive-through lane at the drop of a hat. He can also pounce at the precise moment without compromising either’s safety (11:12). He’s the real deal alright.

He keeps his professional cool until he’s cramped by a Golf at higher speeds (9:01). His gesticulation is justified; the oblivious driver ahead needs to provide the faster cars a way through—especially in the fastest sections of the track. Like a seasoned pro, he proceeds unfazed until his podium hopes are dashed with mechanical failure of some sort (12:32). To suffer something like that to happen in one of the Nordschleife’s most intimidating corners and not panic deserves some sort of prize, though.

Not the hand gesture I would’ve picked, but it show remarkable composure in dangerous situations.

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This Is What An F1-Powered 1986 Porsche 930 Sounds Like

Understated but sporting a very special.

The elusive TAG V6-powered 930 has become stuff of legend—more myth than reality. Hearsay about a small batch of these development mules have circled around the internet, with only a few grainy photos as evidence to their existence. For fans of Porsche and F1, this wedding of greats is something truly special to finally see in action—like spotting an elusive white whale.

Fans of ’80s Formula 1 will no doubt recognize the trademark throaty burble of the TAG TT1 P01. The 80-degree, 1.5-liter V6, force-fed by two KKK turbochargers and soaring to 12,600 rpm, made as much as 1,100 horsepower in qualifying trim. While not the most powerful as the contemporary Honda, Renault, and BMW engines, the Porsche-TAG engine was one of the most successful.

In an era dogged by unreliability, this motor was one of the more robust. Rather than peak power, Porsche chased reliability and a seamless chassis-engine integration. This foresight resulted in this motor three drivers’ championships, two constructors’ championships, and an astounding 25 wins from its 68 races.

Though justifiably conservative with the 930, it’s still extremely quick down the front straight.

It was also extremely light at just 320 pounds without turbos, intercoolers, or exhaust. When thrown in the rear of the 930, it brought the total to 2,425 pounds. This car was used as a development mule to get the most out of the motor at the time, though this example was detuned slightly. Rather than running full boost and revs, they dropped both for a total of 510 horsepower at 9,000 rpm. Remember, these motors — sometimes referred to as « grenades » — were boosted at 50+ psi in race trim, so some changes were needed for reliability’s sake.

Lanzante will be building 11 of these at the price of $1.45 million a pop. Even with the restrained run and poor camera work, it still looks like it’s worth every dollar. Time to start searching through the couch for any misplaced coins.

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