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Matt Farah Takes His Safari 911 For An Urban Adventure

When you think about the perfect Los Angeles city car, you don’t necessarily jump to a 1980s Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2, but once Leh Keen has fiddled with the suspension and interior, it just might be. With a softer suspension, more tire sidewall, and taller ride height, a Safari 911 is an excellent machine for running around in the mean streets of LA. You can hit bumps, curbs, pot holes, and speed humps at speed without so much as a worry about it hurting your car, and certainly without worrying about it compacting your spine as a stiffly sprung motorsport-inspired suspension might.

Matt Farah, of Smoking Tire fame, recently sent his Casis Red Porsche off for a complete overhaul by BBi Autosport and The Keen Project. He drove Leh’s personal car a few years ago, and fell madly in love with the concept. It’s been just over a year since he bought the car, and it’s turned out exactly how he wanted it. With huge knobby tires, a wild interior, some bash bars, and bright as day fog lamps, Safari Project #14 makes for a great city runabout. It’s comfortable, easy to drive, and works exactly as planned. This is the first of three drive reviews of the car, running around in the city. In the near future, Matt promises to bring us reviews of the car on a twisty canyon road and again on an off-road route. I look forward to seeing if his positive opinion continues to hold when he drives the car in those differing environments.

This kind of does go to show that Leh Keen was a genius for kicking off this trend in the Porsche world. They’re apparently brilliant to drive, still retain the character Porsche is known for, and carry an added value that can’t be reproduced anywhere else. That Leh has a waiting list years long is testament to the car, as well. Well done to Leh and well done to Matt for getting the car he wanted. I’m personally so glad he decided to keep it in Casis Red, it’s such a gorgeous color.

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Porsche 911 E-RWB avec un moteur électrique de Tesla de près de 700 ch

RWB : ces 3 lettres symbolisent la personnalisation sur base de Porsche 911 réalisée par le japonnais Akira NAKAI-SAN, qui a créé la société Rauh-Welt Begriff (RWB). Son œuvre est connue à travers le monde avec des voitures aux ailes fortement élargies et notamment de gros ailerons. L’un de ses derniers projets se démarque fortement …

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Reunion in 9 minutes, 11 seconds

The Rennsport Reunion 2018 played host to a moving comeback by a Porsche enthusiast, the most spectacular race cars from Porsche’s history, and the surprising rebirth of the 935. Find out more about these and other highlights in the latest episode from the 9:11 Magazine online TV series.

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Porsche ne s’engagera pas en Formule 1 et dissout l’équipe LMP1

L’idée d’entrer en Formule 1 en devenant le 5ème motoriste était une piste sérieuse envisagée en interne chez Porsche, avec l’arrivé d’une nouvelle réglementation en 2021 concernant le châssis et le moteur. Après avoir participé aux réunions autour de cette nouvelle réglementation, Porsche abandonne définitivement son engagement en Formule 1 pour différentes raisons. Différentes sources …

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New 2019 Porsche 911 revealed

We’re in San Francisco, California, in an underground parking garage of a hotel in Fisherman’s Wharf. It’s busy outside, the countless tourists distracted by the Golden Gate Bridge, Alcatraz, and all the other amusements the City By The Bay offers. In the garage is a fleet of Porsche’s new 992, along with the odd Cayman and Boxster; Porsche’s engineers are in town, but they’re seeking a different kind of amusement. I’ll be with them for a day of testing, joining a convoy of four Carrera Ss undergoing some final checks prior to the board coming out for a final sign-off drive.

Porsche will launch the new 992 with the Carrera S and 4S Coupe in PDK form, with the Carrera and Carrera 4 following in 2019, its introduction also adding manual transmission to the entire line-up. The Cabriolet will join in 2019, while Porsche is also apace with its development of the GT and Turbo models. They’re not discussing those today, the team doing its best to distract attention from the prototype Turbo that’s lurking elsewhere here underground. As-yet-unconfirmed rumours suggest the Turbo S will deliver in excess of 650hp. The world’s gone mad.

Back to reality, though, the 992 Carrera S I’ll be jumping in the passenger seat of will be heading out of the city to the mountain roads around San Francisco. This part of the US is used due to the sizeable elevation changes it offers, the predictable climate and, in Alex Ernst’s words: “The aggressive local driving.” That relates specifically to the abrupt stop-start traffic, the on-off-on the throttle nature of freeway driving and the terrible, combed concrete surfaces on those freeways. That Porsche sells a considerable number of its annual production in California is no bad thing, either.

Ernst is very familiar with all of it; being the team leader of testing he’s been involved in every 911 since the 996. Joining his usual team of engineers today will be Matthias Hofstetter, director, powertrain product lines 911/718; Andreas Pröbstle, project manager, complete vehicle model lines 718/911, and ‘Mr 911’ himself, August Achleitner, vice president, product lines 911/718. And Total 911, of course.

It’s no surprise that the 992 is instantly familiar, the disguise fooling nobody. Porsche isn’t about to mess with the winning formula. The detailing is different, the camouflage doing little to mask the cool recessed structure of the rear lights, a red strip spanning the entire rear of the Carrera. That’ll be a feature on all, and it’ll be the same width, Achleitner saying that all Carreras will feature a wide body. Dimensionally the new Carrera and Carrera S will
be the same width as the outgoing 991 GTS. They’ll be some 5mm higher, and 20mm longer at the front – the latter for styling purposes. The rear track will match the GTS, though Porsche has upped the front track by 40mm.

That change, says Achleitner, “allows us to transmit more loading forces without a stiffer stabiliser. It enables us to lower the stiffness of the roll bar on the rear axle to transmit higher forces for accelerating out of a curve.” Filling the rear wheel arches in the Carrera S will be a 21-inch wheel with 305/30/ZR21 tyres, the front axle getting 20-inch alloys wearing 245/30 section rubber, the 992 being the first series Carrera to wear staggered wheel sizes. The body is lighter, too, Porsche using aluminium for the panel that begins at the A-pillar and runs over to the rear, it previously being steel, the doors and front wing being made of aluminium, too.

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