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911 Carrera 3.0 – 370 ch

991.2 Carrera v Carrera T: how does the T improve on the base car?

Lighter, more focused and simple. We like the sound of that here at Total 911, particularly when it comes to cars. We first heard about the Carrera T some months ago and, frankly, we could barely contain our excitement. On first details, it sounded exactly like the Carrera should be, even if the ‘T’ moniker seems a little bit contrived. The specification sounds more like a Clubsport, the T’s Touring badge wrapped up in the contradictions of the car’s lighter, more focussed specification. Still, it fits with the Touring ethos of the GT3 at the other extreme, Porsche’s naming strategy somewhat haphazard presently.

Nomenclature be damned though. The Carrera T’s specification makes for interesting reading. The changes, in typically Porsche fashion, are moderate in isolation, though add them up and they’re convincing enough to make for a differing whole. Like the GTS above the S, then, the Carrera T is a box-ticking exercise in specification that enhances and improves, while cleverly adding a few unique elements that mark it out as distinct.

Porsche’s message with it is ‘Less is more’ and that it’s all about the driving. Certainly its specification addresses concern in some quarters that the 911 leans more towards the GT spectrum in 991.2 guise than ever before. Using the Carrera as its basis, the 3.0-litre turbocharged flat-six develops the same 370hp as the entry-level 911. There’s less weight, the quoted unladen weight being 1,425kg, Porsche saying that’s 20kg less than a similarly specified Carrera.

There is some smoke and mirrors going on here though, the Carrera T’s specification has the Miami Blue car here listed at that 1,425kg, while the specification for the silver Carrera Coupe we’ve brought along to test against it reads 1,430kg. There’s 5kg in it here, then, and even that’s open to debate, as the Carrera T comes equipped here with a PCM module. It does without rear seats though, has the reduced sound deadening too, while the windows from the driver and passenger side ones back are lightweight glass – it, like the rear seat and PCM delete a no-cost option to have as standard.

Spend an hour or two on the configurator, as I have, and you’ll find all the slight differences, specifying a standard Carrera, as much as is possible to the specification of a standard Carrera T will see it surpass the Carrera T’s price tag. Throw in the Carrera T’s unique ‘lightweight’ bits and pieces and it all makes a bit more sense, the German-plated car weighing in at £89,994. That is a creep of £4,368 over its £85,576 list price – thank paint and a few other non-essential niceties like the Carrera T interior pack that adds contrasting silver stitching and door straps, but even then the closest I could get the Carrera specification saw it rise to around £89,000 in comparison.

The car silver Carrera here is close enough, being £84,891, visually, externally it takes a keen-eyed spotter to notice the differences. Twenty-inch wheels are standard, while there’s a painted grey finish to the rear engine slats.

For the full feature, pick up your copy of Total 911 issue 163 in shops now or get it delivered via via myfavouritemagazines.co.uk.

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2017 Porsche supertest: 991.2 Carrera v GTS v Turbo S

It’s just gone 7am on a bright autumnal morning as I roll out onto the public road, some retracting black gates and a bright red ‘PORSCHE’ script atop a grey building behind filling the rear view mirrors of my 991.2 Carrera. Before long the customary visual of Porsche Centre Reading, the home of Porsche Cars Great Britain, is well out of sight, a plethora of shiny cars among its grandiose setting swapped for the derriere of a British motorway.

All is not lost, however, for I feel like a large proportion of the showroom has accompanied me on my trip due north. This is because out the windscreen of my GT Silver Carrera I’m treated to the glare of that red connecting strip of a tail light adorning an identically hued C4 GTS, while in front of that, the super-wide hips of a Miami blue Turbo S occupies the horizon. It’s Supertest time for Total 911 once again, which means your favourite Porsche magazine has custody of the three Neunelfers in question for two days of full-on driving as part of our sojourn to the twisty roads in Britain’s Peak District.

As our Supertest is prone to showing, there are many ways to skin a cat, so to speak, such is the 911’s dexterity to offer different driving experiences from what is essentially one car concept. This is something Porsche’s iconic sports car has always been renowned for: right from its early, pre-impact bumper days, those ‘T’, ‘E’ and ’S’ models offered vastly different flavours of the 911 philosophy. This remains true today, for while these three 911s on test are all from the latest 991.2 generation, the reality is they couldn’t be more different, varying significantly in terms of power output, chassis dimensions, spec and, of course, value.

The mention of those T, E, and S models is no accident, either. Representing the entry-level, middle-of-the-road and top-spec incarnation of 911 from 1965-1973, it’s a model lineup Total 911 has sought to mimic closely here, choosing the Carrera, GTS and Turbo S as the modern-day interpretations of those original T, E and S cars. Why no GT 911s, you may ask? Well, we discarded them from the lineup as, let’s face it, you can’t just walk into a Porsche Centre and readily buy one like you can a Carrera or Turbo. So, that’s the scene justifiably set: the mission of our 2017 Supertest then is to look at the entire breadth of the non-GT lineup in search of the model with the greatest 911 value for money.

Click here to read the full article of our 2017 Supertest, or download via the Apple or Android newsstands. 

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Porsche 911 Carrera 2017 : plaisirs démodés

Ferrari et Lamborghini ne font plus de boîtes manuelles. Quand la nouvelle est sortie il y a déjà quelque temps, la communauté internet s’est révoltée. Elle a pourfendu ces deux marques, les a accusées de ne pas respecter leurs clients, la vente de t-shirts à l’effigie des trois pédales a …

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Porsche 911 Carrera et Carrera S 2017, une 911 Turbo sans le nom !

L’année 2017 marque un pas important pour la Porsche 911 Carrera qui nous arrive sous une nouvelle génération. Et non, ce ne sont pas ses nouvelles lignes qui passeront à l’histoire, mais bien les changements apportés sous le capot arrière. Après avoir défendu corps et âme ses moteurs atmosphériques dans …

262119_2017_Porsche_911

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Video: 2016 Porsche 911 Carrera Review

Porsche’s latest and greatest Carerra has been well reviewed by journalists around the world. Today, we have a new review to show you, this time from Lee at Supercar Advocates. In this video review, Lee takes us on a walkaround tour and drive of the latest 2016 Porsche 911 Carerra (991.2). For those of you…

Video: 2016 Porsche 911 Carrera Review

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