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911 Turbo S Flachbau 3.6 – 385 ch [1994]

’94 Porsche 965 Turbo S Flachbau… Bouquet final !

Avant de lancer une nouvelle 911, Porsche sort généralement un modèle ultime, une sorte de bouquet final avant de tourner la page. Série ultra-limitée, full option, qui devenait aussitôt collector dès sa sortie de concession. En tout cas, en 94, alors que la 964 allait laisser sa place à la 993, Porsche surprend tout le […]

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30 yearsof 964: C2 v RS and Turbo v Turbo-look

Modernity is what the 964 brought to the 911, it arriving on the cusp of a new decade and would, in the then-CEO Heinz Branitzki’s words, “be the 911 for the next 25 years.” It never was, nor, admittedly, was it intended to be, but in the six years it was produced the increase in technology, as well as the proliferation of models, set the template for how the 911 would evolve into the model line we recognise today.

Its massively revised structure and chassis was able to incorporate necessities like power steering, driver and passenger airbags, an automatic transmission and also four-wheel drive. It was tested more rigorously on automated test beds, was built using more modern, cost-effective production techniques and brought the 911’s look up to date, without taking away from its iconic lines.

Such was Porsche’s focus on four-wheel drive it was launched as a Carrera 4, the Carrera 2 following it into production in 1989. Over the six, short years that followed the 964 would proliferate into a model line-up including Targa, Cabriolet, Turbo and RS in the regular series models, with specials like the Turbo S, RS 3.8, 30 Jahre and Speedster models all adding to the mix. It came at the right time, too, replacing the outdated 3.2 Carrera and boosting sales for Porsche when it needed them, the Carrera 2 and 4 selling 63,570 examples, those specials and the Turbos and RSs adding around 10,000 sales on top of that.

It was a successful, important car for Porsche, but just how does it stack up today, and which one to go for? The 964 is the car that introduced the 911 conundrum, one which, in part at least, we’re going to try and settle here today. We’ve four 964s here: a Carrera 2, an RS, a Carrera 4 widebody with its Turbo-aping hips, and a later 3.6 example of the 964 Turbo. The Carrera 2, naturally, is the most available, with some 19,484 sales globally, the RS selling some 2,405, the widebody being very limited (numbers are hard to come by) and the Turbo 3.6 finding 1,427 buyers for the year it was produced.

For many the Carrera 2 is the obvious choice, but take all the numbers out of the equation and things get a little bit different. To digest it there’s a natural split, the narrow and widebody cars, which is why I’m jumping first into the slim-hipped Carreras, and specifically that big-selling Carrera 2.

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Actualité : A vendre : rare Porsche 964 Turbo Flatnose

Hexagon Modern Classics propose actuellement à la vente dans son showroom londonien, un rare exemplaire de la Porsche 964 Turbo Flachbau (Flatnose)…

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Ten tantalising photos of issue 139’s Porsche 964 Turbo Flachbau

It’s not every day that you get behind the wheel of a Porsche 964 Turbo 3.6 Flatnose, let alone one of just 12 right-hand drive examples of Porsche Exclusive’s final Flachbau.

So, when the opportunity came along for issue 139 of Total 911, we naturally jumped at the chance and, after it proved so popular yesterday, it only seemed right that we share a few more photos of the Flatnose for your viewing pleasure.

It may not be to everyone’s tastes but, the 968-style front end is certainly eye-catching, especially when those bug-eyed headlights pop up from the sloping front wings, creating a silhouette unlike any other Porsche 911.

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To read more about this super rare Porsche 964 Turbo Flatnose, pick up Total 911 issue 139 in store this weekend. Alternatively, order your copy online for home delivery or download it straight to your digital device now.

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Porsche 964 Turbo 3.6 Flatnose: an exotic oddity

Foot flat to the floor in third gear, I’m still waiting to make any meaningful progress around the high-speed test track, the location for today’s latest Total 911 drive.

As the orange needle on the VDO tachometer sweeps past the 3,000rpm mark though, the whistling that had previously been but a mere mumble through the cockpit grows to a more pronounced shriek. The flat-six sound track swells, too, in unison, growling angrily as the aural experience combines with an old school dollop of single turbo boost.

The pace has switched from ‘pedestrian’ to ‘brutal’ in the blink of an eye, the 911 Turbo galloping forward with indecent haste as the tree trunks lining the road blur into an organic mess in my peripheral vision.

964 Turbo Flatnose engine

The road has seemingly narrowed, too, with this Neunelfer chasing the horizon so violently that it appears to have outsprinted my eyes’ ability to compute the perspective of the situation. In fact, the 964 Turbo 3.6’s 385bhp, wrought from a single KKK turbocharger, has left nearly all of my senses needing recalibration.

My first experience of the Turbo 3.6’s full throttle theatrics thumps me in the small of my back, leaving my internal organs feeling like they’ve been deposited some distance further back down the road; the place where the full 0.8 bar of boost kicked in; the place that is now almost invisible in the rear view mirror.

After too long spent in silky smooth twin turbo 911s, I had forgotten what a magical experience the old 911 Turbos could deliver, like a roller coaster that has just pitched over the top of its crest.

964 Turbo Flatnose front

Each time I push down with my right foot, after an appreciable half-a-second or so of lag, I’m continually shocked by the ferocity of the acceleration, the car squatting over its wide rear haunches like a 100 metre sprinter launching from the blocks.

I didn’t realise a car that is now 22 years old could pack such a powerful punch. The sound track to this barely-tamed beast only serves to heighten the addictiveness of the thumping motor’s boost, the bark of the flat six overlaid with an unbridled whoosh from the turbocharger, followed by that classic air-cooled chatter and a subtle hiss as 11.6psi of pressure is suddenly exhaled on the overrun.

I’m so excited by the speed that it seems incredible this particular 911 has only seen 1,014km of action. How could the previous owner have just this left car idle for most of its life?

To read our test of the super rare Porsche 964 Turbo 3.6 Flatnose in full, pick up Total 911 issue 139 in store today. Alternatively, order your copy online for home delivery, or download it straight to your digital device now.

964 Turbo Flatnose incar

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