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911 964 [1989 à 1994]

Porsche 964… Courant d’air !

Il fut un temps où rouler en Porsche 964 ne nécessitait pas d’avoir coché tous les numéros gagnants d’une grille de Loto… Oui je sais, aujourd’hui, quand on repense à cette époque pas si lointaine, on plonge dans des pensées bien nostalgiques. En attendant, il y en a qui ont su profiter quand il était […]

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Porsche 964 Targa RWB – White Walker…

Attention, missile en approche ! Et ce missile sous testo’ est une Porsche 964 Targa, passée sous les mains expertes d’Akira Nakai pour lui faire gagner du muscle… beaucoup de muscles ! La grenouille est devenue boeuf et s’appelle désormais White Walker… Une Porsche 964 Targa, c’est le moyen de se balader cheveux au vent, […]

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Turbo v Carrera: 964 RS v Turbo II

Less is more. Or perhaps more is more. After an unforgettable day with two iconic 964s, I’m still struggling to decide. Both cars are Midnight blue,
and both will set you back around £200,000, but there the similarities end. As driving machines the Carrera RS and Turbo 3.6 could scarcely be more different.

I rendezvous with Editor Lee at Hexagon Classics, where the 911s are waiting outside. I’m drawn to the RS first: its neat, narrow-body lines and just-so stance look purposeful yet achingly pretty.

The Turbo is almost cartoonish by comparison, with swollen flanks, dished alloys and a mighty rear wing. If the former appeals to connoisseurs, the latter is an unashamed crowd-pleaser.

Driving either Porsche around London would, frankly, be like eating a Michelin-starred meal in a motorhome, so we set a course for rural Buckinghamshire, me in the RS and Lee in the Turbo.

As we join the gridlocked North Circular, though, I’m already beginning to regret my choice. The Rennsport’s cabin is so spartan it borders on masochistic. Indeed, it’s more useful to list what it doesn’t have: items binned include the sunroof; air conditioning; electric front seats, windows and mirrors; rear seats; radio and cassette player; heated rear window; central locking and alarm. 

This isn’t what carmakers euphemistically term ‘decontenting’, however. The reborn RS also has a seam-welded bodyshell, aluminium bonnet, thinner glass, shorter wiring loom, virtually no soundproofing and no underseal.

Porsche’s standard ten-year anti-corrosion warranty was cut to three years as a result. On the plus side it weighs 120kg less than a 964 Carrera 2 in Lightweight spec, as tested here.

Hemmed in by towering SUVs as we approach Hanger Lane, I have only the coarse clatter of the single-mass flywheel for company. Even at idle the RS sounds austere and combative, the fluctuating churn of its flat six transmitted to my ribcage via hard-shell Recaro seats.

Its ride is rock solid, too, amplifying every ripple in the road. Thank 40mm lower suspension derived from the Carrera Cup racer, larger 17-inch alloys and solid engine mounts.

Filtering onto the A40, a national speed limit sign finally hovers into view. The Turbo is up ahead and I watch its haunches squat as Lee lights the fuse. I slip the stubbier gear lever into third and give chase.

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Speedster generations

“I took a 911 Cabriolet off the line and drove it to my hot-rod shop,” admits Preuninger. That car became a mix-up of Gen1 GT3 and that Cabriolet.

The result of the GT boss’ work was first shown to a select group of customers as far back as 2014 alongside the 911 R concept, which the Speedster shares a lot of DNA with. This new Speedster is a GT department model, a car which, if you take Speedsters at their most elemental, it always should have been. 

Even so, Preuninger admits: “We didn’t focus on every last gram and we’re not concerned about lap times.” While that might be true, a kerbweight of 1,465kg is just 52kg more than a manual GT3.

The Speedster, like the R, is exclusively manual, with no PDK being offered, saving 17kg in weight and pleasing the driving purists among us. There are the same 911 R carbon-fibre front wings, the underbody at the rear being R-derived, while PCCB is standard too.

Those early customers who saw it liked the idea of a properly raw Speedster, doing without any roof, but Preuninger and his team denied them that, fitting a hood, in part to ensure that owners actually use them rather than park them away with delivery miles in collections. And the 1,948 Porsche will build? That’s the year when the first Speedster was built. 

Opening the low, neat roof is simple enough – a button unlatches the hood at the top of the lower windscreen and unclips the buttresses which then spring up from the large clamshell. The clamshell lock is released too, and the huge carbon-fibre panel – the largest Porsche has ever made, and weighing just 10kg – lifts out and back on struts, the hood simply pushed into its stowage area underneath.

Pop down the cover and the Speedster is open, as it should be, the slightly steeper rake and lowering of the screen, as well as that rear, fundamentally changing the look of the 911. It’s very reminiscent of original 356 Speedsters, losing the sometimes-uncomfortable, heavy-looking rear of later 911 Speedster models. There’s also a hint of Carrera GT in its proportions, particularly that rear three-quarter view.

The black stone guards on the flanks fore of the rear wheels were a late – and necessary – addition, admits Preuninger, breaking the visual length while harking back to the G-series models.

You don’t have to have them, and if you’re after an even more retro style then there’s the Heritage Pack plus a numbered, customised Porsche Design timepiece, as is the norm these days.

Forget those, though. Preuninger leans in, says to press Auto Blip and the exhaust button and go and drive it. I argue I’ll do the footwork myself and leave the Auto Blip off, Preuninger laughing and saying: “It’s better than you,” before adding, “and me…”

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What Was It Like To Drive A 964 RS America When It Was New?

The 964 RS America is an enigmatic part of Porsche’s history. Americans weren’t exactly suffering from an over abundance of money in the early 1990s, and Porsche Cars North America was suffering as a result. Prices of Porsche cars increased dramatically as the US Dollar weakened, and Porsche needed a way to get lower-priced cars into dealer showrooms to draw folks back in. The bargain basement Porsche of the day was the 964 RS America, which stripped a bunch of expensive standard features from the Carrera 2, and dropped the price nearly $10,000.

These days RS America models regularly trade hands for around twice what a standard Carrera 2 can fetch. What is it about this car, what was once the least expensive 911 on the market, that calls out the big buyers? Well, for starters, only 701 examples were sold. The car came from the factory without leather seating, power steering, rear seats, or a speed-activated rear wing. It was a little bit lighter than a Carrera 2, but less than 100 pounds differentiated the two. The manual steering rack provided slightly more feedback to the driver, but I’ve never known a Carrera 2 to be a particularly numb experience to begin with. But it doesn’t have any more power or higher revving engine or any of that. So it pretty much boils down to rarity.

This video below gives us a look at what the contemporary Motorweek program thought of the RS America in-period. They stuck Brian Redman behind the wheel and let him loose at Roebling Road in Savannah, Georgia, which is always good for a few laughs. Brian seemed to have liked the experience, and the review team decided that the loss of standard equipment was a fair trade for the low down price. Back in 1993 the less-than-Carrera-2 price made a lot of sense. Today, the double-a-Carrera-2 price seems absurd.

What do you think? Does the RS name on this car inspire envy in your heart, or are you fine with a bog standard Carrera 2?

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