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Boxster 2.7 – 265 ch [depuis 2012]

Porsche Boxster/911 Black Edition : noir intégral

Porsche joue la carte de la sobriété et de l’élégance en dévoilant les versions Black Edition pour ses Boxster et 911 Carrera.

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Porsche Boxster review – Price, Specs and 0-60 time

2012 Porsche Boxster 2.7 Guards Red
For 
The best all-round, sub-£100k roadster in the world
Against 
Cayman coupe is an even sweeter steer

The ultimate open top sports car?

evo Verdict

If the aim is to have a sportscar that covers all the bases, little can touch the Boxster. True, a Lotus Exige S might offer a more tautly calibrated driving experience – as, to a degree, does the Boxster’s hard top sibling, the Cayman. There are other competitors with bigger engines wrapped in more glamorous bodywork. And some that will give you more kit and gadgets for the money.  In a sense, the Boxster finds itself in market sector defined by specialist talents. But because the Porsche delivers excellence so generously in all areas, it’s hard to regard the opposition as anything other than compromised.  To drive, the Boxster is up there with the very best, as an ownership proposition, it simply has no peers.

evo Tip

The facelifted 2016 Boxster and Cayman are bound to be special cars but word is they won’t be powered by naturally-aspirated flat-six engines but turbocharged ‘fours’ in the quest for cleaner emissions. So if you love the flat-six, best not hang around.

evo Comment

The Boxster is phenomenally recommendable. It does so much so well with such iron confidence and effortless panache it’s almost impossible, as a buyer, not to end up way ahead of the game. On top of which, it’s beautifully built and finished and has an electric hood so slick it makes most of the competition’s look slow and over complicated.

To drive, it’s a car that feels uncannily open and direct with beautifully clean responses, an almost palpable sense of immediacy and wonderful balance. In these respects, even the 911 falls short of the standards the Boxster sets.  Put all-out performance to one side and the Boxster is the best open top car Porsche has ever made.

Performance and 0-60 time

It isn’t just the base 261bhp 2.7-litre Boxster that loves (indeed, needs) to rev when asked to stretch its legs, the 3.4-litre S relies on its top end to provide the real kick in its performance, too. Its flat-six engine simply isn’t endowed with masses of low- and mid-range torque, so it’s perhaps just as well that its heady red line isn’t there for show.

From a gravelly, hollow throb at low revs, the engine spins with building smoothness, urgency and aural aggression while the spot-on ratios and butter-slick gearchange combine to make wringing every last one of the 311bhp a rare and exhilarating pleasure.

The experience is even better with the optional sports exhaust fitted, especially if you appreciate all the crackling explosions on the overrun at high revs. Subjectively it makes the Boxster S feel even quicker than its claimed 0-62mph time of 5.1sec, though, at the sprint benchmark, the 2.7-litre car isn’t that far behind at 5.8sec. Flat out, however, the S hits 173mph, a good 10mph up on the base model.

If that isn’t quite enough, there’s always the GTS which raises the Boxster’s firepower to 325bhp and 273lb ft – making it 14bhp and 8lb ft punchier than the S – and, in league with the lower, tauter and more amply-booted chassis, delivers the mid-engined roadster’s best game, even if the on-paper performance stats (0-62mph in 5.0sec and 174mph) are only marginally improved.

Engine and Gearbox

At 2.7 litres, the third generation Boxster’s base engine is smaller than the 2.9 used in the outgoing Boxster and slightly more powerful, if a little less torquey: the 261bhp and 206lb ft outputs represent a 9bhp rise and 8lb ft drop. Even so, peak power still pips that of the original Boxster S.

As for the current S, the extra capacity of its 3.4-litre flat-six qualifies as a genuine step change, delivering 311bhp at 6700rpm and 265 lb ft at 4500rpm. The range-topping GTS uses the same larger engine strategically tweaked to give an extra 15bhp. As before, though, all the engines feature direct injection for optimum efficiency.

The deliciously slick and positive six-speed manual gearbox is fitted as standard across the range with Porsche’s seven-speed PDK double clutch transmission available as an option, as it was on the previous models. This time it has revised software for quicker and smoother shifts and, against the clock, is the quickest way to accelerate in a Boxster.

Ride and Handling

Measured against almost any rival – and even the 911 Carrera – the Boxster feels more agile and fluent. And, yes, we’re talking about the entry-level 2.7-litre car here. The chassis is especially efficient at communicating small but critical dynamic cues. Getting a feel for the point of balance seems almost absurdly easy and natural and immediately inspires huge confidence and traction is outstanding, too.

As you’d expect, the Boxster S is still more gifted and focused. Further enhanced with the optional PASM adaptive dampers and 20-inch rims (19s are standard), body control is exemplary and grip simply stunning, with the whole car displaying perfect mid-engined balance, perhaps helped by the (again optional) limited-slip differential with Porsche Torque Vectoring.

While the electric steering it isn’t quite as full of subtle feel as the old hydraulic system, it doesn’t significantly dilute enjoyment. You can feel the front tyres biting and then smearing across the road surface as you load them hard into a turn. The steering’s weighting is good too and its accuracy is unquestionable.

The GTS builds on these core qualities, adding yet more dynamic resolve while finessing feedback. Every control is so finely weighted and every response so intuitive that you’re never in any doubt where you have placed the car on the road, or perhaps more importantly, where you want to place the car on the road. Within just a few miles you feel keyed into the car to the extent where you are practising heel-and-toe on every downshift and revelling in the starkly transparent steering feel. 

Push harder and GTS really comes into its own. The ratio of 235/35 and 265/35 ZR20 tyres (front/rear) to 325bhp does tend to cap drifting antics in the dry, unless brutally provoked. However, drive to the car’s strengths – low centre of gravity, great balance, exceptional rear grip – an you can cover ground at quite extraordinary speed without ever feeling that the car is teetering on the edge of a large insurance claim. In other words, it can cope with whatever you throw at it.

MPG and Running Costs

A principal attraction of the way the Boxster goes about its high speed business is Porsche’s belief that pleasure doesn’t have to be balanced by pain (at the pumps). Stop/start is standard across the range and the direct injection flat-six is, by design, an efficient motor.  The base 2.7-litre manual transmission model has a very reasonable combined consumption figure of 34.4mpg. Likewise the 192g/km of CO2 considering the performance on offer.

Undoubtedly, Porsche’s lightweight tech helps the Boxster achieve its fine economy figures, as does the PDK ‘box if optioned. It features a ‘sailing’ mode that decouples it from the engine in periods of trailing throttle or on longer downhill sections, dropping the engine revs to a 700rpm idle. Thus equipped, The 2.7 Boxster achieves a combined consumption of 36.7mpg, with 35.3mpg for the Boxster S and 34.3mpg for the GTS.

Boxster residuals have always been strong, with all versions retaining nearly 60 percent of their value after three years motoring. Yet it’s also true that, apart from the GTS, you don’t get a huge amount of equipment as standard. A Boxster that hasn’t had an appointment with the extensive extras catalogue is rare indeed.

Prices, Specs and Rivals

Prices start at around £37,000, which is cheaper than top-spec versions of the BMW Z4 and Mercedes SLK. You’ll pay a premium of around £8,000 for the S model with its bigger engine and marginal increase in kit while the GTS is a further £5,600 and adds popular options such as the active suspension as standard, 20-inch wheels, sports seats, sports exhaust and extra Alcantara and leather in the cabin.

Read our Audi TT roadster review

As an all-round proposition, the Boxster is harder than ever to beat. Audi’s TT Roadster, BMW’s Z4 and the Mercedes SLK rank are fine but blunt instruments by comparison, and aren’t nearly as much fun. Lower-rung F-Type Jaguars are tempting but stymied by their pathetic luggage arrangements (the Boxster has two boots). Compared to the previous generation car the current Boxster also looks much more confident and assured, and it certainly no longer deserves to be called the ‘poor man’s Porsche’.

Interior and Tech

The Boxster’s cabin is a reassuringly comfortable and well organised place to be. Both the driving position and the shaping and support of the seats nudge perfection while ergonomics, build and finish have never been better. It’s pretty spacious, too, with plenty of leg- and headroom for driver and passenger. The usefully shaped boots in the nose and tail add up to a respectable 280-litres luggage of volume. There are also a number of handy cubbies in the interior, including a lockable glovebox.

The fabric roof will open or close in just nine seconds and it’s all done with just the press of a button (rather than having to secure it manually as you did before). Excellent insulation means it keeps the cabin quiet and free of draughts when it is in place.

Standard kit isn’t exactly generous but does include Alcantara-trimmed sports seats with electrically adjustable backrests, 18-inch alloy wheels, a CD stereo with a 7-inch colour touchscreen, auto headlights, air conditioning and a universal audio interface offering a multitude of connectivity options. In addition to this, the Cayman S gets larger 19-inch alloy wheels, a part leather interior and Bi-Xenon headlights.

Design

The lighter, lower, faster, more efficient 981 generation Boxster doesn’t just look a whole lot better than the older Boxster, its body is 40 per cent more torsionally rigid, the front track is 40mm wider, the rear 18mm wider and the wheelbase is 60mm longer. Yet it weighs 25kg or 35kg (depending whether you pick the manual or PDK options) less than the previous car.

Best looking of all, the GTS has 20-inch wheels and smoked ‘Porsche Dynamic Light System Plus’ bi-xenon headlights, which adjust the range of their beams according to the traffic ahead.

The car’s nose is 30mm longer thanks to a modified spoiler lip, and the air inlets are larger. Mechanically, there’s PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management), plus Sport Chrono, which allows you to tune the damping and throttle response at the touch of a button. Also standard are ‘Sports Seats Plus’ and a sports exhaust. Option these parts on a Boxster S and you’d raise the price to GTS levels.

4 Mar 2015
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Jaguar F-Type vs Porsche rivals

The F-Type: great-value alternative to the 911, or a seriously pricey Boxster rival? Erm, it’s both.
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Essais cabriolets : R8, Z4, F-Type, DS3, Boxster, et plein d’autres encore

jaguar f-type essai (10) L’été est enfin là, et plus rien ne s’oppose donc à ce que vous réalisiez ce vieux fantasme : acheter une découvrable.  Pour quelques pistes de réflexion, relisez nos derniers essais cabriolets ci-dessous. De la DS3 Cabrio à la Jaguar F-Type en passant par la Mazda MX-5 ou l’Opel Cascada, il y en a pour tous les goûts. Notre essai de l’Audi R8 V10 Spider Notre essai de la Citroën DS3 Cabrio Notre essai de la BMW Z4 sDrive 18i Notre essai de la Jaguar F-Type 3.0 V6 S Notre essai de la Jaguar F-Type 5.0 V8 S Notre comparatif Mazda MX-5 / Mini Roadster Notre essai de l’Opel Cascada Notre essai de la Porsche Boxster Notre essai de la Secma F16 Notre essai de la Volkswagen Coccinelle Cabriolet Cet article Essais cabriolets : R8, Z4, F-Type, DS3, Boxster, et plein d’autres encore est apparu en premier sur Autonews.fr.
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