Vous êtes ici : PassionPorsche > 01 - Modèles > Modèles de série > 356 [1948 à 1965] > 356 A [1956 à 1959]

356 A [1956 à 1959]

Porsche 356 A

Speedster generations

“I took a 911 Cabriolet off the line and drove it to my hot-rod shop,” admits Preuninger. That car became a mix-up of Gen1 GT3 and that Cabriolet.

The result of the GT boss’ work was first shown to a select group of customers as far back as 2014 alongside the 911 R concept, which the Speedster shares a lot of DNA with. This new Speedster is a GT department model, a car which, if you take Speedsters at their most elemental, it always should have been. 

Even so, Preuninger admits: “We didn’t focus on every last gram and we’re not concerned about lap times.” While that might be true, a kerbweight of 1,465kg is just 52kg more than a manual GT3.

The Speedster, like the R, is exclusively manual, with no PDK being offered, saving 17kg in weight and pleasing the driving purists among us. There are the same 911 R carbon-fibre front wings, the underbody at the rear being R-derived, while PCCB is standard too.

Those early customers who saw it liked the idea of a properly raw Speedster, doing without any roof, but Preuninger and his team denied them that, fitting a hood, in part to ensure that owners actually use them rather than park them away with delivery miles in collections. And the 1,948 Porsche will build? That’s the year when the first Speedster was built. 

Opening the low, neat roof is simple enough – a button unlatches the hood at the top of the lower windscreen and unclips the buttresses which then spring up from the large clamshell. The clamshell lock is released too, and the huge carbon-fibre panel – the largest Porsche has ever made, and weighing just 10kg – lifts out and back on struts, the hood simply pushed into its stowage area underneath.

Pop down the cover and the Speedster is open, as it should be, the slightly steeper rake and lowering of the screen, as well as that rear, fundamentally changing the look of the 911. It’s very reminiscent of original 356 Speedsters, losing the sometimes-uncomfortable, heavy-looking rear of later 911 Speedster models. There’s also a hint of Carrera GT in its proportions, particularly that rear three-quarter view.

The black stone guards on the flanks fore of the rear wheels were a late – and necessary – addition, admits Preuninger, breaking the visual length while harking back to the G-series models.

You don’t have to have them, and if you’re after an even more retro style then there’s the Heritage Pack plus a numbered, customised Porsche Design timepiece, as is the norm these days.

Forget those, though. Preuninger leans in, says to press Auto Blip and the exhaust button and go and drive it. I argue I’ll do the footwork myself and leave the Auto Blip off, Preuninger laughing and saying: “It’s better than you,” before adding, “and me…”

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Driving the Ultimate Pushrod 356, the SC/GT

Porsche nomenclature can be confusing. In the world of 356s, the Carreras were the top of the heap. The lightweight quad-cam Carreras and Carrera 2s were the GT3s of their day; they were deeply specialized, performance-first machines. Today, however, the Carrera name denotes the bottom of the 911 hierarchy. The SC/GT fit somewhere between the standard pushrod-four powered 356 models and the Carrera 2, and represents the ultimate evolution of the pushrod-powered cars. With aluminum body panels and a potent 1600cc flat-four, these are among the rarest and most desirable of all 356s.

This example was acquired by Bruce Anderson from the original owner in 1965, and Bruce reportedly competed in more than 200 autocrosses with the lightweight car early in his ownership. In 1969 he took the car down to bare metal and performed its first restoration, after which it began a life of concours entries. The car won first in class at Hillsborough, third in class at Pebble Beach, and more with Mr. Anderson.

The car then changed hands several times from the 70s through the early 2000s, and was recently restored by Road Scholars. More photos are available on their website, and believe us, it’s drool-worthy. Wear a bib.

Though the pushrod engine is a far cry from the wailing four-cam, the final SC variants are delightful and potent. The joyful chatter at idle transitions into a purposeful shout as the revs climb, and in a lightweight SC/GT, this car promises to be a serious performer on the road or the concours field. We absolutely love it.

 

 
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Speedster : un nom légendaire chez Porsche

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Porsche Looks Back On The Speedsters That Sped Before

The new 911 Speedster isn’t Zuffenhausen’s first, and hopefully won’t be its last.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Porsche Speedster : le plaisir de conduire depuis plus de six décennies

Les variantes Speedster font partie de l’histoire de l’entreprise Porsche depuis 1952. Elles associent plaisir de conduite à ciel ouvert et dynamisme de conduite exceptionnel. L’ancêtre de tous ces modèles est la 356 America Roadster. Sa carrosserie en aluminium a été fabriquée à la main chez Erich Heuer Karosseriefabrik à Ullersricht près de Weiden dans …

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Pour consulter l'article original et complet, cliquez ici.

Suivez-nous…

Catégories

Archives

Nos partenaires