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Car and Driver

Car and Driver

Car and Driver occupies a special place in the world of automotive magazines, a position earned by a unique combination of dedication, style, technical expertise, and the ability to put our readers in the driver’s seat. Once they’re in that seat, we do our best to see that they learn something of use. And that they enjoy themselves. Each month, Car and Driver presents the latest new cars, vans, SUV’s, and pickups – imports and domestics – with an emphasis on those cars heaven-sent for the man or woman who knows the rewards that an outstanding automobile can confer on its driver. We examine in detail new technology, new directions, and new ideas put forth by the automobile industry. We take a diversified approach to the vehicles that we cover, ranging from the practical (“Matched Boxes: a test of four best-selling minivans”) to the exotic (“How fast is a Ferrari F50?”) to the opinionated (“Ten Best Cars”). Our coverage includes sport-utility vehicles, minivans, and pickups. Consider these facts: No automotive magazine anywhere can claim a higher level of technical knowledge than ours. There are five graduate engineers on our staff, and our testing equipment procedures are state-of-the-art. Few magazines of any kind enjoy a closer relationship with their readers than we do. We understand and respect them; they understand and respect us. In pure numbers, we are the largest automotive magazine in the world, a position that imposes upon our staff the obligation to work even harder at achieving the one goal that truly matters: EXCELLENCE. Finally, when we sit down to write, we do it well. We are more than a well-written car magazine. We are a well-written and well-edited magazine. We not only bear comparison with the best magazines in the business, we invite it.

Spied: Lego Porsche 911 Prototype Kit Debuts at German Toy Fair

Lego Technic Porsche 911

This must be the first time we’ve ever covered spy photos from of a camouflaged prototype Porsche 911 made of . . . Legos. First uncovered by Lego site Brothers-Brick.com, which appears to have sourced photos from Eurobrick.com forums, the upcoming Porsche 911 Technic kit debuted at the Spielwarenmesse toy show in Nuremberg, Germany. Incredibly, Lego appears to have kept Porsche’s swirly camouflage design—which it slathers over future products it wants to keep under visual wraps—which looks awesome.

So far, the Porsche 911 kit appears to have a part number and packaging, indicating it’s ready to go on sale, should Lego decide to sell it. Unlike recent Lego car models such as the VW camper, Mini Cooper, and Ferrari F40, the Porsche is a Technic kit, a slightly different style that uses special pieces. Other recent automotive-themed Technic models include a Mercedes-Benz Unimog and a Mercedes-Benz Arocs heavy-duty truck. We’ll need to wait for the Porsche’s full debut—and appearance in Lego’s catalog—for pricing and availability, but don’t expect to pay anything less than $100 for one.

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2017 Porsche 718 Boxster / 718 Boxster S Unveiled: Zuffenhausen Goes for Four


-Rumors flew for years that Porsche’s Boxster and Cayman would get turbocharged four-cylinder power at some point in the future. And to place the cars in line with the brand’s historic mid-engined, four-cylinder racing machines, Zuffenhausen announced late last year that the new cars henceforth would be known as the 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman. And furthermore, that the cars would switch places in the company’s lineup, with the hardtop Cayman anchoring the bottom end of Porsche’s sports-car range, while the convertible Boxster would command a price premium. We now know the price of the Boxster—although not yet its premium, since the figures for the 718 Cayman are not yet out. The base 718 Boxster will start at $57,050, while the Boxster S will begin at $69,450. That’s an increase of $3900 and $4500 over the previous car. The new version arrives in June. READ MORE ››

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2017 Porsche 718 Boxster: Zuffenhausen Goes For Four – Official Photos and Info

2017 Porsche 718 Boxster and 718 Boxster S2017 Porsche 718 Boxster2017 Porsche 718 Boxster2017 Porsche 718 Boxster2017 Porsche 718 Boxster S2017 Porsche 718 Boxster S2017 Porsche 718 Boxster S2017 Porsche 718 Boxster S2017 Porsche 718 Boxster S2017 Porsche 718 Boxster S

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Porsche Committed to Manual Transmissions “For As Long As Possible”

2012-Porsche-911-Carrera-shifter-626x626

Manual gearboxes no longer make much rational sense for sports car makers. Dual-clutch automatic transmissions, or even well-sorted conventional automatics, can shift gears quicker and return better fuel economy. And as driver-assistance systems get closer to full autonomy, cars so equipped will increasingly need to also exercise control over ratio selection. Hence the depressing trend of the declining number of stick-equipped sports cars.

That’s not going to be the case at Porsche, however, with the company acknowledging that manual gearboxes still have an emotional appeal that far outweighs their technical limitations. Erhard Mössle, Porsche’s engineering boss for the 911 Turbo, Carrera 4, and Targa, was happy to reassure us that we’ll be seeing manual-equipped 911s for the foreseeable future.

“It’s a unique selling proposition for Porsche to have a manual in the 911 range, and I think we will fight for that as long as possible,” he told us. “Even if it’s only 10 percent of the market, it’s important for some customers and for some markets, especially the U.S., to have that kind of gearbox.”

At the moment 85 percent of Porsche’s global 911 production comes equipped with the PDK automatic, although that figure is trending downward of late. But Mössle insists that, for as long as any sizable number of 911 customers want to buy a stick-equipped 911, the company will continue to offer one, a commitment that seemingly extends to Porsche’s other sports car offerings.

“What we learned from the last two years with the Cayman GT4 and Boxster Spyder is that it’s not only a discussion of lap times, but also of emotion, of being fun to drive,” Mössle said. “Even if the car is not the fastest, it is fun to drive with a manual. Of course the PDK is faster, but a lot of customers want to change gear by themselves. Therefore I think we should keep it, for the next generation also.”

With the next-gen 911 not coming due until 2020 that means, by our math, we should have a manual version available until at least 2028 or thereabouts.

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That 7:18 ’Ring Time For the New Porsche 911 Turbo S Is Real—Sort Of

2017 Porsche 911 Turbo

When Porsche announced at the Detroit auto show that the new 911 Turbo S is capable of lapping the Nürburgring Nordschleife in 7 minutes and 18 seconds, we were genuinely surprised. Not because of the time itself, which is well within the frame of reference for Porsche’s megafast machinery, and which means that the four-wheel-drive Turbo S is quicker around the ’Ring than the GT3 RS. But because we thought there was supposed to be a moratorium on manufacturers announcing times from the 12.9-mile circuit, which currently has two speed-restricted sections, imposed after a fatal crash in a race last year.

As to the first charge, the 911 Turbo’s engineering boss, Erhard Mössle, only smiled when we talked to him about it on Porsche’s stand at NAIAS, but he also admitted that there’s some digital simulation in that number.

“Some parts are driven and compared to the previous 911 Turbo,” he explained, “and the [speed-] limited sections where you’re not allowed to do top speed are calculated. We will then go and check it later this year in spring when the speed limits are removed. But the 7:18 we are sure to meet; we are normally very conservative with times and that time was set on the standard tires, not sports tires.”

We’ll leave you to decide on the morality of this one, but it looks as though even the imposition of speed limits can’t spare us the claim and counter-claim of Nürburgring lap times.

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