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Motor Werks Racing : Porsche 924 Heritage Tribute Edition…

Chez Motor Werks Racing, on aime la Porsche 924 GTP. A tel point, que le préparateur de Cumming, une bourgade située en Géorgie au nord d’Atlanta, s’en est fait une spécialité… Recréer des 924 GTP de course, qui reprennent les livrées d’époque et reçoivent sous leur capot, un 1.8l turbo sous hormones… Le paradis des […]

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Gemballa’s 818-HP Porsche 991 Turbo Is Utterly Glorious

This bespoke beast will sprint from 0-62 mph in just 2.38 seconds.

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VIDÉO – La Porsche 911 Carrera S atteint les 200 km/h en 10 secondes

Si la Carrera S est si redoutable, on n’ose pas imaginer la version Turbo S.

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Doug DeMuro Dishes on the New Cayenne Turbo

When the Cayenne debuted in 2003, Porsche was mired in controversy. The 996 defied Porsche convention, abandoning air cooling and gaining both radiators and amorphous headlights. Hot on the tails of sharpening up the 911’s lighting in 2002, Porsche launched in to yet another controversy. In 2003, Porsche released an SUV. Though sharing a platform with the Volkswagen Touareg, the original Cayenne was very decidedly a Porsche. Each successive generation has been fast, luxurious, and handled in a way that defied their immense girth. With a new model freshly arriving to the US, it is only fitting that Doug DeMuro lends his trademark enthusiasm to its quirks and features.

Despite criticism from the press, which it garnered mostly from simply existing, the Cayenne became a runaway sales success. In 2018, the Cayenne outsold the 911 and the 718 combined. Over more than a decade and a half of production the model has steadily evolved, gaining class-leading technology, and even spawning hybrid derivatives back in 2010.

The $160k Cayenne Turbo Doug is demonstrating is about as well-equipped of a Cayenne as you are likely to see in real life. Equipped with the Sport Chrono package, Porsche Carbon Ceramic Brakes, and Burmester audio, this Cayenne features a whopping $35k in optional equipment. As I found using Porsche’s configurator, however, it’s not difficult to add nearly $70k in options to a Cayenne Turbo. You could likely go even higher, should you disregard my desire for all the optional trim to color-coordinate.

At nearly 24 minutes, this overview is one of Doug’s longest, barring genuine exotics or his occasional forays into the genuinely bizarre. Given that the instrument panel displays contain more technology than my entire daily driver, that’s not at all surprising.

What are your thoughts on the new Cayenne Turbo? Let us know in the comments below.

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Otto Mathé and The Fetzenflieger

The latest edition of the 9:11 video magazine features one of the most peculiar Porsche-based specials of all time: The Fetzenflieger

Otto Mathé began racing motorcycles at 16 years old. He continued racing motorcycles through his twenties, until 28 years old when an accident caused paralysis in his right arm. For the time being, Otto was out of competition. Throughout the thirties and Second World War he ran a service station where he produced fuel and oil additives. Following the Second World War the Austrian began racing again.

Lacking the use of his right arm, Mathé made the prudent decision to switch from two wheels to four. In 1949 he purchased one of the Type 64 Berlin-Rome cars from Porsche. With that car, and a 356, he returned to motorsport. Notably, both the Type 64 and Mathé’s 356 were right-hand drive, allowing him to shift with his left hand. Mathé contested the Coppa d’Oro delle Dolomiti in 1949, ultimately winning the event in 1952.

The Fetzenflieger

But for the former motorcycle racer, an enclosed car was clearly insufficient. In the early 1950s, Mathé began constructing a small open-wheel racecar. Based around a combination of Volkswagen and Porsche components, the car was originally powered by a 1.5-liter Porsche Spyder engine, and weighed just 395 kilograms. In motorcycle terms, that is about 85% of the weight of a Harley-Davidson Road Glide.

The diminutive racer was known as « The Fetzenflieger, » literally « tatter-flinger, » thanks to its white cloth side-panels which were often blown apart by backfires. The car proved to be a force to be reckoned with in competition. It featured a mid-engined layout, low center of gravity, and an extremely short wheelbase. The addition of a Fuhrmann engine from a 356A Carrera GT made the car even more potent.

Like his earlier Type 64 and 356, the car featured a shifter to the left of the driver. While this did allow Mathé to shift with his good hand, he had to use his right shoulder to brace the steering wheel while steering. This peculiar posture made him a fixture at European events.

Mathé primarily used the Fetzenflieger for sand and ice racing, though he also made fenders, lights, and a spare tire carrier. These additions allowed the Tatter Flinger to compete in on-road events as well as circuit events.

Following years of competition success, Mathé ultimately retired from racing, passing in 1995 at 98 years old.

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