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Glorious Noise from the Eighth Porsche Sound Nacht

Porsche hosts a celebration of noise. How magnificent is that? Now in its eighth year, Sound Nacht has grown from its past in a large conference hall to center stage of the Porsche arena. Just under 4,000 Porsche fans showed up to come bask in the auditory triumphs of their favorite brand. The exhibition featured thirteen cars, with sounds ranging from the authoritative bark and rush of air from the 962, to more subdued noise of 356/001. The event also featured the sonic stylings of a Panamera Sport Turismo and a team of dancers. With growth comes variety, and what might seem slightly silly in concept has only become more compelling after nearly a decade.

While the Porsche flat-six is the sound the brand is most known for, it is far from the be-all, end-all of Porsche noise. When Porsche ranked their top five sounds, just two flat-sixes made the list. Porsche’s sonic repertoire isn’t a one-dimensional thing, it’s a broad and varied collection that would do Captain Beefheart proud. With engines from four to twelve cylinders on offer, and the booming acoustics of an arena, this edition of Sound Nacht may be the grandest yet.

We will admit though, the Panamera bit was a bit odd.

Below is a brief clip showing each car to appear at the event.

Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo

Porsche 356/001

Porsche 962

Porsche 804 Formula 1

Porsche 917

Porsche 911 RSR Turbo 2.1

Porsche 935/78

Porsche 911 GT1-98

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar

Porsche 964 Carrera Cup

Porsche 996 GT3 Cup

Note: This car suffered an unusual issue, and began to slide backwards across the angled turntable used for the event.

Porsche 996 GT3 RSR

Porsche 919 Hybrid

Porsche 991 RSR

 
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La future Porsche 911 GT3 aperçue une nouvelle fois

Son lancement n’est pas prévu avant 2020.

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Porsche lance la Panamera GTS

Comme la mort et les taxes, l’arrivée d’une édition GTS pour la Panamera de deuxième génération était une certitude, au même titre que l’annonce éventuelle d’un Cayenne GTS redessiné. Les Porsche Panamera GTS et GTS Sport Turismo 2019 proposeront une appa…

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2019 Porsche Panamera GTS Models Revealed

Porsche have today taken the covers off of the latest model in the Panamera range. The Porsche Panamera GTS and Panamera GTS Sport Turismo models have been officially revealed. Porsche aficionado’s will be well aware of what to expect from the famous badge. The GTS badge has its roots in the 1963 Porsche Carrera GTS. […]

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forward-dated 911 SC: back to the future

The road ahead is deserted, its twisting Tarmac totally bereft of traffic. A thick wall of trees lines the roadside, their density willing us to keep moving our 991 towards the setting sun.

A look in the rear-view mirror reveals much the same story behind us. The highway is empty, save for two hazy yellow lights in the far distance. However, as the minutes tick by, those lights become more prominent. Glancing briefly at the road ahead, my eyes return to the 991’s rear-view mirror, fixated on those yellow lights coming quickly towards us. There’s a red hue visible between them now. A bonnet. A roof. A windscreen. It’s a car.

The rate at which this car is closing in on us is astonishing. It surges up the stretch of road behind us, revealing more detail with each passing second as its features become ever larger in our mirrors. A 964, I think to myself, catching its chunky front PU with integrated side lights. Then, roaring up behind us, the 964 pulls out and shoots past, gliding back in line and charging up the road ahead. Now the confusion sets in: replete with one-piece bumper, full-width rear reflector with clear ‘Porsche’ script, a distinctive tea tray spoiler and wheels with the lip and profile of Cup-spec alloys, the visual cues give this car away as a 964 3.3 Turbo. However, the mechanical howl of that flat six as it shot past certainly wasn’t akin to the noise of a 911 with an exhaust turbocharger bolted on. So, what on earth has just overtaken us on this rural stretch of Swedish asphalt?

Luckily, we don’t have to wait too long to find out. Not 20 minutes later we pull into a gas station and there, sitting by the pumps in front, is our mystery Porsche 911, being fuelled by its joint owner, Andreas. Originally a 1982 SC, the car was converted to a 964-look of sorts before Andreas and co-owner Lennart bought the car, though closer inspection of that one-piece Strosek front PU shows it to be more 944 than 911. We’re also told the rear bumper mimics that of a 3.0 RS. A peek inside reveals the car’s true age, its Pasha interior an obvious giveaway. Not that this car is trying to hide anything: Andreas and Lennart have even left the ‘SC’ lettering on the car’s decklid.

In our contemporary world where backdating a 911 is all the rage, the idea of a forward-dated 911 makes for an odd concept, but one which, in a bygone era, was a popular conversion. Due to the large spectrum of interchangeable parts on air-cooled 911s, many found favour with the idea of swapping a few panels to make an older model look just like one which had only just rolled off the production line at Zuffenhausen. Much like backdating, how convincing the car looked depended largely on how far you were willing to go, or how much you were willing to spend. So what of the car we’ve caught up with?

Andreas tells me he and Lennart bought the car in its current guise, complete with ‘teardrop’ wing mirrors commonly found on later 964s. “We found favour with how different it was compared to other SCs, and especially liked how it drove,” Andreas tells me as he replaces the fuel hose and tightens the 911’s filler cap. So did Andreas and Lennart ever consider converting the car back to standard, or backdating it – as is currently in vogue – to a longhood, pre-impact bumper 911? “No, because a lot of work had gone into converting it to 964 spec. For example, the rear reflector on a 964 sits at a slightly different angle to the G-series cars, so getting this to fit required the previous owner to make some modifications to the rear wings. We believe this is part of the history of the car and shouldn’t be changed,” comes Andreas’ reply.

For the full feature on forward-dated 911s, including a how-to guide from specialists, pick up your copy of Total 911 issue 171 in shops now. You can also order your copy here for delivery to your door anywhere in the world, or download to an Apple or Android device of your choice. 

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